How frequent are hurricanes in the US? #NatlPrep #hurrycaine

Third Saturday in the 2015 National Preparedness Month! Last day/chance for hurricanes.

Do you want to have a better understanding of the hurricane risk you and your community face? Below is a map of the United States and the frequency of hurricane and tropical storm activity by county. Atlantic data dates back to 1851, while Pacific data includes storms since 1949.

hurricanemap750w

Map Information: This area is a map of the continental United States, Puerto Rico, Alaska, and Hawaii including state boundaries. It is entitled “Frequency of Hurricane and Tropical Storm Activity by County: 1851-2012”. It includes data from NOAA NHC HURDAT2 database; all classified hurricanes and tropical storms which made landfall within the 50 states, the District of Columbia, or Puerto Rico; paths by county within a 125 mile band of the center point, based on longitude. Atlantic data from 1851-2012, Pacific data from 1949-2012.Map Description: The frequency of hurricane and tropical storms are represented by a four point scale. The first group with the highest frequency of hurricanes and tropical storms includes between 65-141 occurrences of a hurricane or tropical storm. The area of states for this level of the scale includes the coastal edges of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, and Delaware, as well as all of Florida. The second group with the second highest frequency of hurricanes and tropical storms includes between 29-64 occurrences of a hurricane or tropical storm. The area of states for this level includes inland portions of states in the first group, as well as Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhodes Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine, as well as all of Puerto Rico. The third group with the lowest frequency of hurricanes and tropical storms includes between 1-29 occurrences of a hurricane or tropical storm. This area of states covers a large portion of the United States, and extends from Vermont in the east to southern California in the west, and from central Texas in the south to all of Michigan in the north, as well as Hawaii. The last group in the scale represents no occurrences of a hurricane or tropical storm. This area of states covers all of Alaska, Washington state, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, all of Utah excluding the southwestern tip, and parts of California, Nevada, New Mexico, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, and Wisconsin. In all about two-thirds of the US are within one of the first three frequency groups. Federal Emergency Management AgencyORR Mapping and Analysis Center, Washington, D.C., March 13, 2014. Sources: ESRI, USGS.

It’s only a matter of time before you are affected by a hurricane.

Don’t wait. Communicate. Make your emergency plan today.

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#Hurrycaine Hurricanes are dangerousso get Ready by starting here

(#Hurrycaine <==get it?)

@rusnivek

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