17-001: A Shake That Never Happened #PIO #Safety #SocialMedia

17-001: A Shake That Never Happened
Agency: US Geological Survey (USGS) Topic(s):      Error message / human error
Date: 06-23-17 Platform:      Twitter/Email

Sometimes, US Geological Survey (USGS) computers have 6.8 sized hiccups which automatically pushed out info this past Wednesday. This caused serious concern as numerous Emergency Management professionals and PIOs desperately searched to verify information on any earthquake in California. None was to be found on Wednesday June 21, 2017.

As you can see, the date listed in the email notification isn’t consistent with Wednesday’s date as well as the time stamp of publication.

Even worse was the 140-character tweet with even less text/info that initially went out to their 679K followers (@USGS). With the magnitude and epicenter location in a well populated area (Santa Barbara CA), it is crucial that we have multiple sources to verify critical information.

As humans, our attention span has shortened. (SQUIRREL!) Likely thousands misread the initial date/time listed on the email. Even less took the time to click the link in the tweet.

USGS noticed the error and posted this explanation of the errand info. Emails were sent to explain the deleted event.

Obviously more than 140 characters, they screen shot a typed response and posted the image to twitter referencing their errant tweet. The USGS used this tactic to get more information and characters into an otherwise short 140-character tweet.

Whether computer or human error, fessing up to an error on social media is embarrassing. However, the ramifications of arbitrarily deleting info without prior public notification will gander your agency a rash of criticism from the most loyal of followers. Government agencies should strive to foster trust and transparency with all of their constituency. Not to mention, deletion of your posts must match your agency’s policy/procedure or SOP/SOG.

Three important tips to consider if an agency posts something weird:

  1. Trust, but verify information. Trust your social media intuition.
  2. Correlate data from various sources to make an informed decision for ongoing operations.
  3. Admit your mistakes. It happens. Human error is a thing.

Mistakes happen, but how you recover will either make you a hero or a zero. Maximize your efforts on social media including screenshots of your more-than-140-character-response.

Time is short, so tweet / email correct stuff!

@rusnivek

****Or download the one-pager here: AShakeThatNeverHappened-Safety-PIO-SM-17-001***

Maybe watch a quick video from USA Today

Did the USA Today just feature Jennifer and I for the SB Earthquake hiccup?

Um, did the USA Today just feature Jennifer and I in the USGS earthquake hiccup?

#famous

Here’s the link to the full animation: https://www.usatoday.com/videos/news/2017/06/22/fake-earthquake-shakes-up-internet/103098496/

@rusnivek

Day-4 of the DHS/FEMA AH NIMS ICS IMT IC Course at OEMA

Day-4 of the DHS/FEMA All Hazards NIMS ICS IMT Incident Commander course here at Ohio EMA.


Lots of sharing of ideas esp from our partners from the US Foresty Division.


Obviously, they deal with large incidents all the time – esp this year being an already busy wildfire year.


Additionally, talking about the entire Command and General Staff and how they interact with all other positions are key to formulating a successful team.


Just glad we have everyone contributing to the conversation.

Lots of passionate people wanting every community to work together and succeed.

@rusnivek

Day-2 of IMT Incident Commander on integration and deployment bags

Lots to learn today with deep discussions on integration with various local, county, state, and Federal officials.


It’s acronym galore!

If you were wondering, that flow chart above makes perfect sense to me.

Morning was also spent on a huge discussion on deployment preparedness.


Trust me, I definitely got that part down.

Long day ahead tomorrow too including meetings with City of Columbus officials.

@rusnivek

Day-1 of IMT Incident Commander course at OEMA

Morning Ohio EMA! #Mothership


Welcome to the first day of NIMS ICS Incident Management Team Incident Commander course!


Got a quick welcome from Ohio EMA Training & Exercise David Nunley.


Lots to discuss including responsibilities, leadership, and of course paperwork (ICS forms).

Great first day with participants from Ohio, New Mexico, Oregon, and Georgia with tons to digest in all the slides.


Lots.


Channeling my inner Patrick.

Looking forward to tomorrow!

@rusnivek