Helmet mounted systems for augmented reality? Well…

Assessing a few helmet mounted systems today for augmented reality in-field use.

Some of them totally cool…

U.S. Air Force Capt. Brad Matherne, 422nd Test and Evaluation Squadron pilot, views the flightline inside an F-35A Lightning II before a training mission, April 4, 2013, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. The 422nd TES will design the tactics for the F-35A. The squadron will also determine how to integrate the F-35A with other aircraft in the Air Force inventory. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Brett Clashman)

…some of them not so much.

Information overload continues to be a problem for any user including the ongoing data deluge to our military fixed and rotor wing pilots who regularly use these variants of these systems.

And simplicity just isn’t going to cut it.

Additionally, hardware barriers are easy to overcome but the software still lags due to lack of high speed connection. Cellular speeds are lackluster, but the apps required to do overlay of information hogs data up real quick. Additionally, the power required to run these complex apps on hardware is huge.

Maybe I’ll just go retro.

It’s Monday so keep your head down!

@rusnivek

Facebook +Shaka + rusnivek + VR = ?

Sometimes I get to do some cool things.


My friends at Facebook wanted to showcase their virtual reality (VR) stuff with me.

Shaka + LIKE + @rusnivek

Virtual reality goggles? Yep. The possibilities on Facebook Messenger/chat/meetings are endless.

Software has some inherent challenges esp with the shortfall of hardware proliferation and consistency. Bandwidth issues and requirements are tough enough to manage for reasonable VR interaction and usage.

But overall, some neeto VR stuff.

See, I told you VR is closer than you think.

@rusnivek

Everyone’s talking about PokemonGo #PG

So far, this is making me feel guilty for abandoning my Second Life personna and my Tomagochi I got as a gift.

 

Pokemon Go is a free-to-play, GPS based augmented reality mobile game developed by Niantic for iOS and Android devices. It was initially released in July 2016. The game allows players to capture, battle, and train virtual Pokemon who appear throughout the real world. Although the game is free-to-play, it supports in-app purchases. (Wikipedia)

 
Keep in mind, I did not grow up with Pokémon so I don’t think I have quite the attraction/ nostalgia to this game compared to others in the Nintendo targeted 19-34 age bracket.

 

However, this does show an interesting market shift as virtual reality aka augmented reality starts to integrate into our digital platforms seamlessly through social media. Oh yeah, the geolocation piece of this #gamification is total icing on the cake too. 

Be safe and don’t get “lured” into something bad.

@rusnivek