Whoa, that went well… #AlohaFriday

Whoa….whoa…..whoa……

After getting reassigned from the JIC to the FCO, I was evaluated on my performance.

 

So yeah, that went well.


Great to support the FCO as well as the FEMA Region-1 Incident Management Team (IMAT) this week.


Trust me, without the support of countless PIOs and numerous External Affairs peeps, we could not have accomplished our tasks assigned.


My hope is that we continue to increase our knowledge and expand on ways that we can serve each of our communities daily as well as during any disaster or emergency.

We must relentlessly pursue knowledge from educators who are willing to share their craft with others.


Listen to all of our communities and share kernels of knowledge with others in an open forum so that other PIOs can learn and make good decisions.


It is incumbent upon us to coordinate the response effort for those who have nothing.

And most importantly, it is our duty to serve this great nation.

 

Demobing now. 

Great week. 

@rusnivek

 

Facebook +Shaka + rusnivek + VR = ?

Sometimes I get to do some cool things.


My friends at Facebook wanted to showcase their virtual reality (VR) stuff with me.

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Virtual reality goggles? Yep. The possibilities on Facebook Messenger/chat/meetings are endless.

Software has some inherent challenges esp with the shortfall of hardware proliferation and consistency. Bandwidth issues and requirements are tough enough to manage for reasonable VR interaction and usage.

But overall, some neeto VR stuff.

See, I told you VR is closer than you think.

@rusnivek

Sharing preparedness tips with PIOs across the country #NatlPrep #PrepareAthon

I frequently present to Public Information Officers / Public Affairs Officers (PIOs & PAOs) across the country and talk extensively about preparedness.

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For those that were wondering about the class attire, many of my classes get scheduled on a Friday aka #AlohaFriday

Proud to say that so many of them love the job and enjoy sharing ways to increase safety in all communities with FEMA’s Ready.Gov Program.

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Your local Fire, EMS, Law Enforcement, and Emergency Management agencies are a great starting point for preparedness activities. Then all state safety agencies and Federal partners cooperate top down with many key organizations across the country.

That’s right. Local works with state works with regional works with national.

 

Happy #AlohaFriday peeps!

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“Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.”

@rusnivek

Today is National Preparedness Day! #NatlPrep

Ahhhhh, the last day of 2015 National Preparedness Month – THAT MEANS TODAY IS NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS DAY!!!!

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Oh Yeah – You did it!

I know many of you have shared your tips and preparedness efforts with countless others. I am confident that your shared knowledge will pay off as we better prepare our fellow Americans for any disaster or emergency.

Thanks to all of our active partners in public safety. From the Locals to State to Federal partners who have made this month so successful – thank you!

Thank you to my agencies who have allowed me to share my preparedness tips with you.

I only wonder what will 2016 preparedness bring? Hmmm. Here’s a hint…

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…and a little of this…

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…and definitely more of this.

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Who’s excited? <SQUIRREL!>

Don’t wait. Communicate. Make your emergency plan today.

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Whew-I am so glad that many of you have decided to participate in this month’s activities. Keep in mind that you have 11 more months to address your public in finding ways to be better prepared in a disaster. Planning for the 2016 National Preparedness Month will begin shortly.

As always, start your peeps off right by sending them here.

@rusnivek

A lonely shortened Facebook link on Twitter – Safety-PIO-SM-14-004

14-004: A lonely shortened Facebook link on Twitter
Agency: South Central Sierra Interagency IMT Topic(s):         Shared information/update
Date: Summer 2014 Platform:        Twitter

 

Speed is primarily the reason why everyone loves social media…especially Twitter. Many agencies use social media to provide updates and information when assigned to certain incidents. That’s what the South Central Sierra Interagency Incident Management Team did during the French Fire in California when they pushed this lonely shortened Facebook link out on Twitter.

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I get that 140 character max on Twitter is short…and you have lots to say…and you don’t have time…and blah blah blah. Everyone else doesn’t have time too. But pushing a non-descript link, does raise a concern that perhaps your account has been compromised by spam bots. Your agency has worked diligently to establish solid working relationships. During an emergency is the WORST time for your audience to question and/or ignore your official accounts with trusted reliable information.

 

If your social media plan calls for directing all efforts to Facebook as the primary source of information, a Public Information Officer (PIO) should still take the time to provide a little information (like a short description) on other platforms driving the traffic to that primary source. Providing just a link is not enough.

In the PIO business, we are forced to be precise, however just providing a link pertaining to a dangerous situation or disasters will not be enough to satiate the Twittersphere’s social interest.

 

Audiences change on various social media platforms, however, many agencies *think* they are all the same.

Knowing your audience is the hallmark of success. If you pair your Facebook and Twitter accounts to save time and to pass the exact same message – you should consider separating them now. Remember, you write/post/share information differently on various social media platforms.

 

A more effective tweet could have read:

Still assigned to the French Fire here in California-Check out pictures frm @BLMNational Interagency Fire fb.me/1BV35Tytx #CAWildfire

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You have more visibility by informing your followers that your team is still assigned to the incident.
  2. The link looks less spammy and readers know what the specific content is in the link.
  3. Your #hashtag will give more information about the current overall disaster/emergency.
  4. Your readers are likely to click on this hyperlink because it will take them to a picture. People love pictures.
  5. Your agency shows coordinated efforts with national response agencies when you use @mentions on twitter.

 

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

 

@rusnivek

 

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this: ALonelyShortenedFacebookLinkOnTwitter-Safety-PIO-SM-14-004a

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