17-001: A Shake That Never Happened #PIO #Safety #SocialMedia

17-001: A Shake That Never Happened
Agency: US Geological Survey (USGS) Topic(s):      Error message / human error
Date: 06-23-17 Platform:      Twitter/Email

Sometimes, US Geological Survey (USGS) computers have 6.8 sized hiccups which automatically pushed out info this past Wednesday. This caused serious concern as numerous Emergency Management professionals and PIOs desperately searched to verify information on any earthquake in California. None was to be found on Wednesday June 21, 2017.

As you can see, the date listed in the email notification isn’t consistent with Wednesday’s date as well as the time stamp of publication.

Even worse was the 140-character tweet with even less text/info that initially went out to their 679K followers (@USGS). With the magnitude and epicenter location in a well populated area (Santa Barbara CA), it is crucial that we have multiple sources to verify critical information.

As humans, our attention span has shortened. (SQUIRREL!) Likely thousands misread the initial date/time listed on the email. Even less took the time to click the link in the tweet.

USGS noticed the error and posted this explanation of the errand info. Emails were sent to explain the deleted event.

Obviously more than 140 characters, they screen shot a typed response and posted the image to twitter referencing their errant tweet. The USGS used this tactic to get more information and characters into an otherwise short 140-character tweet.

Whether computer or human error, fessing up to an error on social media is embarrassing. However, the ramifications of arbitrarily deleting info without prior public notification will gander your agency a rash of criticism from the most loyal of followers. Government agencies should strive to foster trust and transparency with all of their constituency. Not to mention, deletion of your posts must match your agency’s policy/procedure or SOP/SOG.

Three important tips to consider if an agency posts something weird:

  1. Trust, but verify information. Trust your social media intuition.
  2. Correlate data from various sources to make an informed decision for ongoing operations.
  3. Admit your mistakes. It happens. Human error is a thing.

Mistakes happen, but how you recover will either make you a hero or a zero. Maximize your efforts on social media including screenshots of your more-than-140-character-response.

Time is short, so tweet / email correct stuff!

@rusnivek

****Or download the one-pager here: AShakeThatNeverHappened-Safety-PIO-SM-17-001***

Maybe watch a quick video from USA Today

Today is National Preparedness Day! #NatlPrep

Ahhhhh, the last day of 2015 National Preparedness Month – THAT MEANS TODAY IS NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS DAY!!!!

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Oh Yeah – You did it!

I know many of you have shared your tips and preparedness efforts with countless others. I am confident that your shared knowledge will pay off as we better prepare our fellow Americans for any disaster or emergency.

Thanks to all of our active partners in public safety. From the Locals to State to Federal partners who have made this month so successful – thank you!

Thank you to my agencies who have allowed me to share my preparedness tips with you.

I only wonder what will 2016 preparedness bring? Hmmm. Here’s a hint…

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…and a little of this…

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…and definitely more of this.

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Who’s excited? <SQUIRREL!>

Don’t wait. Communicate. Make your emergency plan today.

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Whew-I am so glad that many of you have decided to participate in this month’s activities. Keep in mind that you have 11 more months to address your public in finding ways to be better prepared in a disaster. Planning for the 2016 National Preparedness Month will begin shortly.

As always, start your peeps off right by sending them here.

@rusnivek

Definitely an all-hazards approach to events in NOLA

Good to see so much emphasis put on event planning and pre-staged apparatus for events ongoing in NOLA.

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Just the sheer number of agencies involved is a clear sign that emergency agencies here truly believe in the all-hazards mantra.

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Well done to all visible and unmarked agencies involved in providing public safety.

@rusnivek

 

Even the pros train and test emergency plans! #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

It’s Thursday in the fourth week of 2014 National Preparedness Month.

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

ThirstyThursdays…I mean TestingThursdays continues!

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Practice for an emergency

#25: Just like you, the professionals train and test their emergency plans. #Prepared2014 #NatlPrep

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“The State of Ohio Emergency Operations Center is participating in the annual power plant training” Photo cred: Ohio Emergency Management Agency, (Columbus) 09/23/14

It is an essential part of your plan…actually doing it!

This was the view of the State of Ohio Emergency Operations Center where numerous emergency management agencies across the state participated in a multi-agency all-hazards annual power plant training. This training was evaluated by FEMA Region-V.

See, even the professionals train too!

Keep up the great work!

@rusnivek

A list of religious agencies involved in post disaster support #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

Ahhh, the smell of Saturday…in the last day of the second week in 2014 National Preparedness Month.

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

Finishing strong in week-2!

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Know How To plan for specific needs before a Disaster.

#13: Plan with religious agencies to support recovery efforts after a disaster. Keep an updated list at the ready. #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

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Now, I’m not much of a church guy…however you don’t need to be religious to realize these services exist. It would be well worth your time to learn what groups are active and which ones could support your recovery efforts after a big disaster.

So keep a current list with names and phone numbers of groups who are active in disaster recovery. As an example:

And if you don’t use them, maybe your neighbors could utilize their services.

All planning should force you to think outside-the-box when addressing unmet needs. All of these groups are a vital part of our All-Hazards response in rebuilding every community post-disaster.

@rusnivek