#MediaMinutes interview w/ WISHTV-8 Emily Kinzer

As part of our ongoing efforts to help enhance the skills of the PIO, here’s another #MediaMinutes interview w/ WISHTV-8 Emily Kinzer!

For more information on Emily-

@Twitter: https://twitter.com/EmilyKinzer8

@Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/emilykinzer8/

@Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EKinzerReports

Happy AlohaFriday everyone!

@rusnivek

 

Supporting infrastructure today #NEORSD

Slight change of PIO plans today as I was initially assigned to ESF-13 (Law Enforcement) – I have been reallocated to support infrastructure.

So today, I spent some time with the NorthEast Ohio Regional Sewer District, their PIO/Outreach team, and WallyWaterDrop.

WallyWaterDrop and Jessica from NEORSD sharing important safety tips and stickers with everyone..

Great outreach event with Parent Magazine and with so many from our local area.

Also had a chance to pop a quick Periscope live video too.

Nice work Jen Elting!

Here’s a behind the scenes action shot (aka “making the magic happen”).

PIOs in action! (L to R: K. Sur, WallyWaterDrop, and J. Elting) PC: Chief J. Brewington

Great day to support our partners in public safety esp our PIO pros at NEORSD are an invaluable resource.

Fortunately, there was a Starbucks close by…so you know. #hydration

PIO + Coffee = Happy! PC: Chief J. Brewington

Reporting live with some Starbucks…

@rusnivek

17-001: A Shake That Never Happened #PIO #Safety #SocialMedia

17-001: A Shake That Never Happened
Agency: US Geological Survey (USGS) Topic(s):      Error message / human error
Date: 06-23-17 Platform:      Twitter/Email

Sometimes, US Geological Survey (USGS) computers have 6.8 sized hiccups which automatically pushed out info this past Wednesday. This caused serious concern as numerous Emergency Management professionals and PIOs desperately searched to verify information on any earthquake in California. None was to be found on Wednesday June 21, 2017.

As you can see, the date listed in the email notification isn’t consistent with Wednesday’s date as well as the time stamp of publication.

Even worse was the 140-character tweet with even less text/info that initially went out to their 679K followers (@USGS). With the magnitude and epicenter location in a well populated area (Santa Barbara CA), it is crucial that we have multiple sources to verify critical information.

As humans, our attention span has shortened. (SQUIRREL!) Likely thousands misread the initial date/time listed on the email. Even less took the time to click the link in the tweet.

USGS noticed the error and posted this explanation of the errand info. Emails were sent to explain the deleted event.

Obviously more than 140 characters, they screen shot a typed response and posted the image to twitter referencing their errant tweet. The USGS used this tactic to get more information and characters into an otherwise short 140-character tweet.

Whether computer or human error, fessing up to an error on social media is embarrassing. However, the ramifications of arbitrarily deleting info without prior public notification will gander your agency a rash of criticism from the most loyal of followers. Government agencies should strive to foster trust and transparency with all of their constituency. Not to mention, deletion of your posts must match your agency’s policy/procedure or SOP/SOG.

Three important tips to consider if an agency posts something weird:

  1. Trust, but verify information. Trust your social media intuition.
  2. Correlate data from various sources to make an informed decision for ongoing operations.
  3. Admit your mistakes. It happens. Human error is a thing.

Mistakes happen, but how you recover will either make you a hero or a zero. Maximize your efforts on social media including screenshots of your more-than-140-character-response.

Time is short, so tweet / email correct stuff!

@rusnivek

****Or download the one-pager here: AShakeThatNeverHappened-Safety-PIO-SM-17-001***

Maybe watch a quick video from USA Today

TwitterChat on volunteers during disasters today at 1300EST #Prep2Serve #NatlPrep #PrepareAthon

As part of 2016 National Preparedness Month – numerous preparedness peeps will be participating in today’s TwitterChat.

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Gather tips and specific messaging that could work for your community on preparedness. Talk about different groups who are active within their community before, during, and after a disaster.

IMG_6249

RH-CERT in action!

To keep the convo going, consider using the #Prep2Serve today.

See you at 1300EST!

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“Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.”

@rusnivek

Coming in on @GCRTA for the #RNC2016 ? Here’s the #RNCINFO

Like me, are you using the Greater Cleveland Rapid Transit Authority (GCRTA) to get to downtown Cleveland?

Here’s their map and information on their downtown stops.

rta-rnc-service-map-page-001

Also, you can subscribe FOR FREE to their Commuter Alerts program here.

I have found their social media team is very responsive to inquiries. Follow them on Twitter:  @GCRTA

BTW-If you happen to see me, say hi and let’s take a #selfie!

@rusnivek

 

How Emily Austen got fired in ~25 min bec of FacebookLive #SMEM #PIO Safety-PIO-SM-16-003

Fox Sports reporter Emily Austen made the news…yes, she was the news this week when she FUBARed her career on FacebookLive. (If it helps, fast forward to 25:33)

Wait, did Emily just say “Like, I didn’t even know Mexicians were that smart.”

WTF!?!?!?!?

kSMDH

SMDH

Fox Network immediately fired her because of her comments on FacebookLive. Let that sink in for a moment. Fox Network fired her for all the inappropriate comments in this unaffiliated FacebookLive broadcast.

Yeppers-you can get fired for stuff you do on social media.

To be fair to her, Austen did post a statement about it here.

But, to add more fuel to this fire, here’s a story about it from Complex News.

Again, I repeat:

  • You can lose your job over a picture.
  • You can lose your job over a 140-characters (tweet).
  • And yes, you can lose your main job on a couch during a live broadcast.

All thanks to social media.

For more case studies on others who lost their jobs because of social media, check out this link.

In this case, what would have helped?

  1. Not saying dumb things.
  2. A behind the scenes PIO to help coordinate conversation.
  3. Sticking to the “script” of the interview/session.
  4. Professionally maintaining topic relevance and choice of words.
  5. Sticking to communications strategy and abiding by identified corporate Policy/Procedures and SOPs/SOGs.

Or just straight up – don’t say inappropriate things.

Now phleeeze – go out there and use your social media live broadcasting powers for good!

@rusnivek