Stopped by Amazon Day-1 for a quick tour and a banana!

Got a chance to swing by Amazon Day-1 to say hi to a few friends.


And if you are going to ask, we did NOT meet in the new Amazon Spheres.


However, I did see the famous Banana stand – It’s totes real!!!!!

Aside from their new drone delivery (Amazon Air), there was lots of discussion on the new Amazon HQ2 location.

Yo Jeff, I got some ideas.


Special thanks to Suz and G-crew for the quick tour and banana.


Now, about that Amazon Fire thingy…

@rusnivek

Moving another DRC in the Florida Keys

In efforts to best serve the communities that were hardest hit by Hurricane Irma, we (FEMA) moved the Marathon Disaster Recovery Center (DRC) to a new location


As you guessed it, this new DRC has much easier access to the highway.

6805 Overseas Highway in Marathon, Florida

Stop on by to update your records and/or check on your status for disaster assistance.


Reporting live from the new DRC location in Marathon…

@rusnivek

Debris management isn’t easy! #Hurricane #Irma 

Aside from all the response stuff that goes on in the disaster, I think the mainstream public doesn’t understand debris management. In fact, I would go so far as to say that many communities across the US don’t have a debris management plan.

Here’s the current situation here in Monroe County, FL (aka Florida Keys).


This is one of several locations for debris.


What makes this so complex is that because of the smaller geographic location of the islands, it is hard to manage space too.


Emergency Managers should also think about transportation of debris. I’ve had to already roll out my evasive driving maneuvers. Not good.


I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Response is easy. But true Emergency Managers know that Recovery is the hardest phase in a disaster.

@rusnivek

A strong EF-1 tornado that hit Pepper Pike

Yes it is 2016 National Severe Weather Preparedness Week. Back in 2013, a strong EF-1 hit Pepper Pike (Cuyahoga County, Ohio) in 2013 at 3am.

Luckily, there were no deaths associated with this tornado. Trust me, the damage was unreal.

TornadoPepperPikea

Yikes is right. But now is the time to review your preparedness kits and double check your family communications plan.

On Wednesday 03-22-16 at 0950 EST, Ohio will have a statewide test of the tornado sirens. This is only a test.

Test your tornado plans by:

  • Taking shelter in a safe location on the lowest level of a sturdy building
  • Keeping an emergency first aid kit in your shelter location.
  • Having a copy of your family communications plans.
  • Putting on boots (for post tornado debris).

These simple tips could help you survive a tornado strike.

More weather info can be found 24/7 by my trusted partners at NWS-CLE.

I hope that you can participate in our statewide tornado drill tomorrow. #SafetySur #NatlPrep #OHWx #severeprep

@rusnivek

Fill er up please! #NatlPrep #power

This week has been chock full of preparedness tips for power outages.

I know each of you have been working hard at preparing your kits, double checking and updating your supplies. Today’s tip addresses your ride (aka your whip):

Keep your car gas tank at least half full. Gas stations rely on electricity to power their pumps. You’ll also have a good method for charging devices in an emergency or, if necessary, moving to a location with power.

To bring a smile to your Saturday, here’s a quick video for you

Keep your tanks filled…and sing loud and proud!

Don’t wait. Communicate. Make your emergency plan today.

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Knowledge is power…so share your power safety tips with everyone.

Filler up and be ready by starting here!

@rusnivek

Technical jargon and giving actionable information Safety-PIO-SM-14-006

14-006: Technical jargon and giving actionable information
Agency: Chicago Fire Department Topic(s): Industry codes / Actionable info
Date: Fall 2014 Platform: Twitter

Industry speak or technical jargon is part of what we do every day. But using technical terms on a social media platform will be confusing to those who are NOT in the fire service. That’s what the Chicago Fire Department did yesterday at their big 3-alarm fire when they tweeted technical jargon.

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The use of technical jargon is rampant in emergency services but when speaking to the media or the general public, we need to remember that everyone did not grow up with a VOX alarm or SCU tones. In this case, a “311” or 3-11 alarm means that there are 11 engines, 5 Trucks, 2 Tower Ladders, 6 Battalion Chiefs, 1 Rescue Squad, 2 Ambulances, 2 Paramedic Chiefs, Deputy District Chief, Deputy Fire Commissioner, and the 1st Deputy Fire Commissioner are onscene. There is no way to include all that information in a tweet, but using more simple terms will help your audience understand the scale of your ongoing incident.

Before you post images, make sure your pictures are rotated correctly. I know accuracy is sometimes overlooked in lieu of speed, but it takes less than 5 seconds to orientate/rotate a picture (In this case, it was going to be a long operation). And note, by just rotating a picture does not equate that you are “doctoring up” photos. But a correctly posted photo will help media repost and format your information quicker to the masses.

During an emergency situation, your constituents need the information pushes to be actionable and specific to your audience. Not only inform them of the danger, but tell them what they can do about it.

A more effective tweet could have read:

Chicago Fire: Large 3-alarm fire at Harrison St x Fifth Ave. Traffic delays-avoid the area. (insert two pictures)

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You cite the authority having jurisdiction and established incident command presence.
  2. You generally described the size/category of the ongoing incident and critical information to media.
  3. You identify the exact location of the incident.
  4. You describe the delays in the area and give actionable information to your constituents.
  5. You still have lots of room to push properly orientated pictures with your informational tweet.

 

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

@rusnivek

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this file:

TechnicalJargonAndGivingActionableInformation-Safety-PIO-SM-14-006

Aloha – Need some Hurricane Iselle shelter options?

Aloha – Need some Hurricane Iselle shelter options?

Here is a free easy read shelter map for Oahu.

http://cchnl.maps.arcgis.com/apps/OnePane/basicviewer/index.html?appid=d06eeca5c9a84d1c95944ea8a92f9b7b

1. Find the shelter location nearest to you.

2. Have a plan and several routes planned out on how to get there during heavy traffic.

3. Ready your emergency preparedness kit w/ medications, flashlights, Family Communications plan, and supplies.

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Be akamai peeps.

@rusnivek

A fun disaster class…on accountability #NIMS

To the untrained eye, they just look like toys.

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To Incident Commanders, this is an incredibly valuable tool that provides operational and tactical response accountability.

To bring this all-hazards accountability course to your location, just let me know.

Yep, I’m making classes about disasters fun again!

@rusnivek