Are you violating Facebook’s Terms of Service? Safety-PIO-SM-15-004

15-004: Are you violating Facebook’s Terms of Service?
Agency: Various public safety agencies Topic(s):         Facebook organization page
Date: 07-31-15 Platform:        Facebook

Facebook has a wide audience and many public safety agencies have taken to Facebook to promote their efforts. However, many agencies have created the wrong type of account on Facebook.

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By creating your agency’s page as a person on Facebook, you are violating Facebook’s terms of service. And if you are going to ask, Facebook administration has the right to immediately delete everything. Yikes.

By registering your agency as an ORGANIZATIONAL PAGE, you can take advantage of Facebook’s analytics. This information is incredibly valuable as you evaluate who, what, at what time, and most importantly the how and why they are searching/visiting your agency’s organizational page.

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Facebook readily asks if you know people and displays their basic account information. Facebook’s goal is to increase your networks by showcasing people that are similar to you. If you happen to see one of your neighboring public safety agencies who may have incorrectly registered a Facebook personal account, take the time to inform them on changing their account from a personal page to an organizational page.

Likes? As an organization, can I like other pages? Yes, as an organizational page, you can like other agencies too. Through Facebook likes, you can showcase to your trusted network of similar public safety agencies.

Remember, social media is about how you can amplify your networks and positively engage your constituents. We are constantly strengthening our relationships with similar groups – all in the name of safety.

Look, we all need to be good stewards of our public safety brand. All Emergency Support Functions (ESFs) need to constantly support each other and help agencies who need some social media guidance.

By double checking your agency and your partner agencies.

  1. You can be compliant with Facebook’s Terms of Service agreement.
  2. You can ascertain detailed visitor demographics free from Facebook’s organizational analytical information.

Time is valuable, so post good stuff.

@rusnivek

To download the one-pager, click on the link here: Safety-PIO-SM-15-004-PersonalOrOrganizationalOnFacebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

Technical jargon and giving actionable information Safety-PIO-SM-14-006

14-006: Technical jargon and giving actionable information
Agency: Chicago Fire Department Topic(s): Industry codes / Actionable info
Date: Fall 2014 Platform: Twitter

Industry speak or technical jargon is part of what we do every day. But using technical terms on a social media platform will be confusing to those who are NOT in the fire service. That’s what the Chicago Fire Department did yesterday at their big 3-alarm fire when they tweeted technical jargon.

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The use of technical jargon is rampant in emergency services but when speaking to the media or the general public, we need to remember that everyone did not grow up with a VOX alarm or SCU tones. In this case, a “311” or 3-11 alarm means that there are 11 engines, 5 Trucks, 2 Tower Ladders, 6 Battalion Chiefs, 1 Rescue Squad, 2 Ambulances, 2 Paramedic Chiefs, Deputy District Chief, Deputy Fire Commissioner, and the 1st Deputy Fire Commissioner are onscene. There is no way to include all that information in a tweet, but using more simple terms will help your audience understand the scale of your ongoing incident.

Before you post images, make sure your pictures are rotated correctly. I know accuracy is sometimes overlooked in lieu of speed, but it takes less than 5 seconds to orientate/rotate a picture (In this case, it was going to be a long operation). And note, by just rotating a picture does not equate that you are “doctoring up” photos. But a correctly posted photo will help media repost and format your information quicker to the masses.

During an emergency situation, your constituents need the information pushes to be actionable and specific to your audience. Not only inform them of the danger, but tell them what they can do about it.

A more effective tweet could have read:

Chicago Fire: Large 3-alarm fire at Harrison St x Fifth Ave. Traffic delays-avoid the area. (insert two pictures)

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You cite the authority having jurisdiction and established incident command presence.
  2. You generally described the size/category of the ongoing incident and critical information to media.
  3. You identify the exact location of the incident.
  4. You describe the delays in the area and give actionable information to your constituents.
  5. You still have lots of room to push properly orientated pictures with your informational tweet.

 

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

@rusnivek

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this file:

TechnicalJargonAndGivingActionableInformation-Safety-PIO-SM-14-006