Best Practices for Incorporating…

A few good friends sent me the new Best Practices for Incorporating Social Media into Exercises released by the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology First Responders Group.

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Click on the link above to download the entire pdf.

Lots of good reading info in there from the International CAUSE IV experiment that I contributed in Michigan and our international partners in safety – Canada Public Safety.

@rusnivek

 

Support your local first responders #NatlPrep #PrepareAthon

Third solid week of 2016 National Preparedness Month! This week, we honor and celebrate all of our all-hazards first responder who serve tirelessly throughout the country.


Every day, thousands of first responders (paid and volunteer) put it all on the line for the general public we know and people we don’t know. Day or night, countless individuals respond to the call and make a difference in each community.

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In your community, support your local Fire, EMS, Law Enforcement agencies as they work tirelessly to provide safety for all communities big and small.

“Don’t wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.”

@rusnivek

Sharing your #Family #Emergency #Communications #Plan with First Responders #NatlPrep #PrepareAthon

Happy National Preparedness month! The focus during this second week is on preparing friends and family for different emergencies.

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Showcasing the skills of local first responders are incredibly important to adults AND kids. And sharing important information (like a Family Emergency Communications Plan) with first responders is critical.

National Preparedness Month that promotes creating family emergency communications plans.

National Preparedness Month that promotes creating family emergency communications plans.

Often times, we overlook explaining what actually happens during an emergency.

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So take the time to explain to your kids that during an emergency, ALL first responders are there to help. And of course, don’t forget to teach your children to dial 9-1-1.

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Reminder: When teaching children to call 9-1-1, do not verbally say “Nine-Eleven” as there is not an eleven button on the phone.

Do it today!

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“Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.”

@rusnivek

Local Fire Department does EMS too! #EMSWeek2016 #EMSStrong

Happy EMS week peeps.

In many parts of the country, local Fire Departments also run all the EMS calls too.

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Whether Emergency First Responder (EMR), Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT), or Paramedic – they are ALL a part of the safety in our jurisdictions

Thank your local Emergency Medical Services Professionals for a job well done!

 

What is EMS Week?

Since President Gerald Ford first recognized EMS Week in 1973, communities, hospitals, healthcare organizations, survivors and EMS agencies spend a week every year in May recognizing the lifesaving work of EMS professionals. AROUND THE COUNTRY, EMS Week is celebrated with a variety of events.

2016 EMS Week: Sunday May 15 through Saturday May 21

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What is EMS Strong?

The EMS Strong campaign seeks to celebrate, unify and inspire the men and women of our nation’s emergency medical services. Created by the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) in partnership with the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT), EMS Strong brings together associations, EMS services, sponsors and national media to honor the dedication of EMS practitioners nationwide.

@rusnivek

Apparently, my first tweet…was not that exciting. #LoveTwitter

Apparently, my first tweet…was not that exciting.

I guess that’s OK, because I was not out galavanting (or goofing off) on a Tuesday night at 11:28 PM.


Either way, Happy 10 years Twitter!


Looking forward to many more tweets!


#LoveTwitter

@rusnivek

How good is your selfie game?

How good is your selfie game?

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@rusnviek at the White House #SURINDC

Me? My selfie game is on fleek.

Look closely. Yep-that’s a selfie of a selfie. Boom.

Your welcome Pascal.

Additionally, Live with Kelly and Michael deemed this the “Summer Selfie” season complete with random Jersey bikini girls dancing. Yikes.

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But yes Pascal is right, safety first! Reference this foreign selfie-safety info page.

Safety tip: Practice safe selfies. #SafetySur

@rusnivek

Boss went nuts on a flight – now daughter’s foolish conduct

It’s interesting on how various cultures around the world approach the delivered message.

As an example, this type of delivery would never work in the US.

Public Information Officers (PIOs) and Public Affairs Officers (PAOS) must understand significant differences when delivering messages to areas who are culturally diverse.

Your thoughts on the Korean Air President’s comment? “Daughter’s foolish conduct”

(In a few other reports, his message was translated as “Please scold me. It is my fault”)

@rusnivek

Technical jargon and giving actionable information Safety-PIO-SM-14-006

14-006: Technical jargon and giving actionable information
Agency: Chicago Fire Department Topic(s): Industry codes / Actionable info
Date: Fall 2014 Platform: Twitter

Industry speak or technical jargon is part of what we do every day. But using technical terms on a social media platform will be confusing to those who are NOT in the fire service. That’s what the Chicago Fire Department did yesterday at their big 3-alarm fire when they tweeted technical jargon.

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The use of technical jargon is rampant in emergency services but when speaking to the media or the general public, we need to remember that everyone did not grow up with a VOX alarm or SCU tones. In this case, a “311” or 3-11 alarm means that there are 11 engines, 5 Trucks, 2 Tower Ladders, 6 Battalion Chiefs, 1 Rescue Squad, 2 Ambulances, 2 Paramedic Chiefs, Deputy District Chief, Deputy Fire Commissioner, and the 1st Deputy Fire Commissioner are onscene. There is no way to include all that information in a tweet, but using more simple terms will help your audience understand the scale of your ongoing incident.

Before you post images, make sure your pictures are rotated correctly. I know accuracy is sometimes overlooked in lieu of speed, but it takes less than 5 seconds to orientate/rotate a picture (In this case, it was going to be a long operation). And note, by just rotating a picture does not equate that you are “doctoring up” photos. But a correctly posted photo will help media repost and format your information quicker to the masses.

During an emergency situation, your constituents need the information pushes to be actionable and specific to your audience. Not only inform them of the danger, but tell them what they can do about it.

A more effective tweet could have read:

Chicago Fire: Large 3-alarm fire at Harrison St x Fifth Ave. Traffic delays-avoid the area. (insert two pictures)

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You cite the authority having jurisdiction and established incident command presence.
  2. You generally described the size/category of the ongoing incident and critical information to media.
  3. You identify the exact location of the incident.
  4. You describe the delays in the area and give actionable information to your constituents.
  5. You still have lots of room to push properly orientated pictures with your informational tweet.

 

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

@rusnivek

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this file:

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Your pet needs an emergency preparedness kit too! Check out the one I have – ready to go #Prepared2014 #NatlPrep #Woof

It’s finally Friday in this third week of 2014 National Preparedness Month

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

#FridayFurDay right? Or is that #FridayFunday ?

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Build an Emergency Kit

#19: Your pet needs an emergency preparedness kit too! Check out the one I have – ready to go #Prepared2014 #NatlPrep #Woof

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Dry dog food (3 days worth). I have Kacy’s food parceled out into individual easy servings. This way, we don’t over feed her.

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Two (2) bottles of water – which is enough for her for 3 days.

Pet identification (3×5 notecard in zip lock bag which makes this waterproof) which includes our contact cell phones and twitter handles, pet name, date of birth, current vaccinations, county dog registration, vet address, vet phone, and of course a short description of what she looks like. Also in the zip lock bag is Kacy’s pet medications (heart worm pills and flea and tick meds).

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Small bowl to eat and drink.

Dog identification tags that includes her name tag, county dog identification, rabies vaccination information, our contact information, and home address.

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Pet First Aid kit – I got this from a community fair thanks to the local health department. This is a necessity! It will make minor injuries easier to manage.

Extra static 6ft leash…and yes, it’s labeled w/ duct tape with her name on it.

Packable raincoat because in case it rains, we are prepared for adverse weather! Also the “wet dog smell” isn’t the most fragrant aroma.

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Favorite pet toys for Kacy which includes two Nylabone chew toys and a bright orange rubber tennis ball from Target.

*******All of the above items fit nicely in a dog carry pack. *******

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Incidentally, this pack/harness has a handle on the topin case I need to emergently pick her up and go. I also have a green glow stick (break activation) that attaches via carabiner to the top for easy identification during night travel/evacuation.

The pack has several zippered outside pockets so I can separate the medications/Identification from the food.

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These simple and easy basic supplies make up my pet preparedness kit. Keep in mind that everyone’s pet preparedness kits should be different depending on the size and breed of the animal…but it should have the basics like food, water, and medications.

I was reminiscing about my deployment during Hurricane Katrina/Rita in 2005 – our Task Force saw SO many abandoned pets in Louisiana’s Lower 9th Ward.

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In case of an emergency or disaster, PLEASE take the time to prepare/evacuate with your pets as they are part of your family.

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For more information on how you can put together your pet preparedness kit, check out this free FEMA Ready.Gov link on pet preparedness.

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For those wondering, Kacy is a rescue dog. Best. Dog. Ever.

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Special thanks to my dog Kacy for helping out in today’s preparedness post. #woof

@rusnivek