Kicking off 2018 #Hurricane season this Wednesday with DHS Secretary Nielsen and FEMA Administrator Long

Kicking off 2018 #Hurricane season this Wednesday with Department of Homeland Security (@DHSgov) Secretary Kristjen Nielsen and Federal Emergency Management Agency (@FEMA) Administrator Brock Long (@FEMA_Brock).

@rusnivek

Instagram changing the algorithm from likes and share to a more timely feed #SMEM

Thank goodness! Instagram decided to make a major change today in their algorithm.

Yeeeeeeppppp, they are reverting back to a more timely feed for users – just press the “New Posts” button. Basically push to prioritize newer posts over older aggregated Instagram posts.

As Instagram cites backlash, I mean feedback from it’s users. “Thanks to feedback” – yeah yeah.

So what does that mean for you?

  • With the most recent backlash on Facebook (citing the #DeleteFacebook trend), agencies should be making a stronger effort on Instagram.
  • Instagram will likely have a more “true-er” feel than Facebook’s less than 10% showing to your unpaid targeted audience.
  • Instagram is easier as it has less gobble-de-gook for it’s users.
  • Instagram is also more complex because it has less clutter for it’s users.
  • Either way, this change in algorithm from Instagram is a welcome update/refresh to the Gram.

Now about dem hashtags….

@rusnivek

 

 

#PlanAhead to properly use social media during a disaster #NatlPrep 

Since almost everyone uses social media…

Teach your family how to properly use social media BEFORE a disaster. It’s another way to keep in communications w/ your family before, during, and after a disaster. #NatlPrep


Even in a disaster, we should all learn a bit of social responsibility.

And yes, we should all use our social media powers for good.
#PlanAhead to teach your family how to use social media.

@rusnivek

Cleveland Police FacebookLive for NICE – confiscated rifle with drum

Got to work with Cleveland Police today on an ongoing campaign for safety within the community.

But it was such a nice day today that we decided to roll it out in front of Cleveland Police HQ. FYI-a downtown public open plaza makes it a bit more challenging to do live social media feeds.

No time for funny business because FacebookLive is…well LIVE! So no second takes, redo, or screwing around!

OK, a little screwing around.

Yes, sharing the message on FacebookLive does aggregate the video higher on Facebook users’ feed and notifications – however, the content needs to be engaging. Also, needs a teaser, and lead in, and most importantly, a hook!

The story of the arrest flowed easily and the officers were able to recount the events. Like countless police officers across this country, all are proud of the work they do within every community and continue to provide tireless service to their constituents.

Did you see Cleveland Police talking about N.I.C.E. and their apprehension?

I’ll give you a hint, it had to deal with taking guns off the street…also our hook.

N: Neighborhood

I: Impact

C: Community

E: Engagement

Well, if you missed it, you can watch the full FacebookLive video here:

I hope you enjoyed a little behind the scenes PIO views.

I’m glad to be working with a great organization to bring more safety to all residents in the community.

@rusnivek

17-001: A Shake That Never Happened #PIO #Safety #SocialMedia

17-001: A Shake That Never Happened
Agency: US Geological Survey (USGS) Topic(s):      Error message / human error
Date: 06-23-17 Platform:      Twitter/Email

Sometimes, US Geological Survey (USGS) computers have 6.8 sized hiccups which automatically pushed out info this past Wednesday. This caused serious concern as numerous Emergency Management professionals and PIOs desperately searched to verify information on any earthquake in California. None was to be found on Wednesday June 21, 2017.

As you can see, the date listed in the email notification isn’t consistent with Wednesday’s date as well as the time stamp of publication.

Even worse was the 140-character tweet with even less text/info that initially went out to their 679K followers (@USGS). With the magnitude and epicenter location in a well populated area (Santa Barbara CA), it is crucial that we have multiple sources to verify critical information.

As humans, our attention span has shortened. (SQUIRREL!) Likely thousands misread the initial date/time listed on the email. Even less took the time to click the link in the tweet.

USGS noticed the error and posted this explanation of the errand info. Emails were sent to explain the deleted event.

Obviously more than 140 characters, they screen shot a typed response and posted the image to twitter referencing their errant tweet. The USGS used this tactic to get more information and characters into an otherwise short 140-character tweet.

Whether computer or human error, fessing up to an error on social media is embarrassing. However, the ramifications of arbitrarily deleting info without prior public notification will gander your agency a rash of criticism from the most loyal of followers. Government agencies should strive to foster trust and transparency with all of their constituency. Not to mention, deletion of your posts must match your agency’s policy/procedure or SOP/SOG.

Three important tips to consider if an agency posts something weird:

  1. Trust, but verify information. Trust your social media intuition.
  2. Correlate data from various sources to make an informed decision for ongoing operations.
  3. Admit your mistakes. It happens. Human error is a thing.

Mistakes happen, but how you recover will either make you a hero or a zero. Maximize your efforts on social media including screenshots of your more-than-140-character-response.

Time is short, so tweet / email correct stuff!

@rusnivek

****Or download the one-pager here: AShakeThatNeverHappened-Safety-PIO-SM-17-001***

Maybe watch a quick video from USA Today