Aerial operations is critical in a Type-1 disaster #PIO

Large type-1 disasters are complex. Not only complexity but in pure size.

In the Florida Keys, destruction was not just limited to houses and commercial structures, but he Category-4 storm + storm surge + possible tornadic events affected so many ships and vessels.

Aerial operations are so important esp when gathering information on resource management and triaging. This picture is of one of the many ships in the bay that were inoperable and uninhabitable.

However, as response agencies go, we need to prioritize things and see what needs to be done first. Therefore pictures like this are critical to tactical and operational pros.

If you only had a roadside view, you would have only seen this small portion of this disaster.

Yes I said it, rotor wing WTF! Additionally, your favorite PIO can get a better grasp on the situation and report out to stakeholders of ongoing joint operations.

Again, your command element should consider an aerial element with HQ photography to aid in SA/COP.


Night ops for Response & Recovery #Irma 

Just because it’s dark, don’t think operations stop.

Just remember, disaster response and recovery is a 24-hour business. With 12-hour operational periods, there isn’t much time to fool around.

Sadly, PIOs are tasked with countless tasks all day/night long.

Get some rest peeps. I know I’m tired.


LEO to PIO – we have an interview! 

LEOs need some media time too! Let’s go PIO!!

Starting interviews in the front of the Monroe County Emergency Operations Center…


State of Ohio EMA G291 Joint Information Center / System class at Medina County EOC

Packed State of Ohio EMA Joint Information Center / Joint Information System course today!

Started everyone into group work as well as ongoing discussion on the role of SMEs at a press conference.

Just in case, we also tasked participants to start thinking about a policy/protocol for their agency on sneak attack aka ambush interviews.

We found as we leverages our strengths and capitalize on our skills, we as JIC Managers can better meet the needs of any situation – we just gotta find the right PIOs for the job.

As our groups collaborated, we found that despite crossing state lines, we still have the same problems as other areas – thus proving our point that we need to consistently train together and exercise our plans together.

Many of our participants enjoyed working in the JIC setting and were excited to work in a JIC during the next activation. Most excellent as we build a strong cadre of PIOs across this great state.

My Ohio Peeps!

Reporting live from Medina County’s Emergency Operations Center….


Kicking off another Ohio EMA Basic PIO Course in the EOC

Kicking off another great Ohio Emergency Management Agency (OEMA) G-290 Basic Public Information Officer’s Course in Medina County’s Emergency Operations Center.

Photo credit: Erika Moran

Glad to see so many new PIOs from Ohio and West Virginia in class.

Now, the important point to remember is….


Last day ICS-400! Preparing our public safety providers for complex incidents

Last day of ICS-400: Advanced ICS for Command and General Staff – complex incidents.

Great to have providers in our training class from across the state – esp since they are participating in their backup Emergency Operations Center (EOC). Lots to discuss and collaborate esp when discussing MACs (multiagency Coordination) in conjunction with Unified command.

Shared a few videos from back in the day including showcasing a bunch of FL Emergency Managers.

During all the classroom TTEs, I love that so many are actively engaged and participating. This kind of joint effort in preparedness planning and coordinated response will only help solidify efforts in their upcoming National Special Security Event (NSSE).

Great class – thank you to everyone who attended!