Monday = Debris Management!

Starting out this week talking about Debris Management and the importance of Public Works and Logistics!

Yeah, doesn’t seem like a fun topic right? But if you look at the real deal, this is how Emergency Managers earn their keep. Cause it’s not in the response phase.

Emergency Managers work the magic in the recovery phase.

Collaboration in class means that we hash out a few issues prior to the actual disaster.

Working closely with all factions in government will ensure a smooth response from everyone involved.

The faster you get your community back on track, the better your community will be. Building resilient communities is critical!

You should address 10 major factors as part of your debris plan.

Is this difficult? Most definitely. Here’s a picture from the USVI in 2017.

Here’s a picture from the USVI in November 2018.

Can you think of any planning challenges? Any logistical issues? Any major environmental issues?

If you said a million yeseseses to the above three questions, you need to address your debris management plan with your Emergency Management official.

Special mahalos to my Co-instructor Ben.

Sharing a few stories about counter intelligence, we realize it’s a really small world.

@rusnviek

Public Works (ESF-3) part of the response phase #Hurricane #Harvey #Port #Arkansas #Texas #Disaster

I talk about it all the time in class – Emergency Support Function-3 (ESF-3) is an important part of our RESPONSE effort in a disaster.

Why do I talk about this all the time?¬†Public works isn’t considered the traditional Fire or EMS or Law Enforcement….but when faced with this….

Photo credit: Gabe Hernandez (@callergabe) from Hurricane Harvey in Port Arkansas, TX – 08-26-17

Public Works’ efforts with so many various resources allow all public safety to get to affected areas.

Photo credit: Gabe Hernandez (@callergabe) from Hurricane Harvey in Port Arkansas, TX – 08-26-17

Often times, people believe public works is only for recovery and clean up. That is not true. As you can see, we clearly need them during the response phase – just to get to affected areas.

Photo credit: Gabe Hernandez (@callergabe) from Hurricane Harvey in Port Arkansas, TX – 08-26-17

Get to know your public works professionals now. They are an invaluable resource for the response phase.

@rusnivek

 

Bueller? On the highway?

“My best friend’s sister’s boyfriend brother’s girlfriend, heard from this guy who knows this kid who’s going with the girl who saw Ferris pass out at 31 Flavors last night…”

Numerous government agencies are constantly trying to engage with the general public in every community. Keep up the good work ESF-03 and PIOs!

It must be serious.

Reporting live from the highway Р #SaveFerris

@rusnivek

Top notch peeps from across the country in Texas

My social media class today…


Definitely one of the most diverse All-Hazard classes I had in a long while. Participants represented Emergency Management, Fusion Center, Public Works, Land & Natural Resources, Fire, Health Department, EMS, Private sector, HAZMAT, Police, Veteran’s Affairs, Intelligence, US Coast Guard PIAT, National Weather Service, CERT, and PIOs / PAOs.

Top notch peeps from across the country this week!


Special thanks to my old friend Houston Office of Emergency Management Melanie Manville for hosting this new #NDPTC class.

Many Mahalos.

@rusnivek

Building new relationships on a Tuesday #NatlPrep

The last Tuesday in the 2015 National Preparedness Month!

Today, look to building new relationships.

SurNun

Normally, we don’t look outside the realm of daily public safety. It’s easy to talk to Fire/EMS, Law Enforcement, or Public Works Professionals. However, new discussion needs to happen between individuals who can support our mission goals or some unmet needs.

Faith-based organizations are great groups to explore new activities to support your community. In varying degrees, faith-based organizations have the capabilities to support disaster response and recovery operations with food, shelter, and supportive measures. But again, the key is to open discussions BEFORE a disaster so you can evaluate their capability.

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Additionally, talk to your local politicians…esp if they are an active part of your Community Emergency Response Team (CERT). These civic-minded individuals have most likely gone through additional preparedness training and can be a great resource for anyone.

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Trust me, these are the kinds of people you want to be in close contact with before, during, or after an emergency/disaster.

Don’t wait. Communicate. Make your emergency plan today.

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Get to know some new local peeps!

Tuesday is here – so get prepared by clicking here.

@rusnivek