Debris Management with MassEMA

Despite not wearing pink today, we got a solid start to a great response and recovery course here in Massachusetts today.

Great introduction to the DHS/FEMA/NDPTC Debris Management Planning class. Outstanding to work with the Emergency Management Pros again from MassEMA and FEMA Region 1.

Glad to share the same mission and goals as the MassDEP, all agencies need to work together as we decrease our response times in a disaster.

Often times, people believe Debris Management is only for recovery. It isn’t. Debris Management starts in the response phase with local public works resources supporting Fire, EMS, and Police in their initial response.

Yes that’s right, response phase.

Even more surprising is that public works pros (ESF-3) are an integral part of any response plan and should be included as agencies enhance their disaster plans.

Funding is often a challenge as agencies continue to struggle w/ funding and maintaining resources for public works. But sharing ideas and resources could help mitigate deficiencies and increase capabilities for our partners in ESF-03.

As we continue to facilitate good conversation, we often talk about burn rates and projections to ensure that we are consistently bringing in resources to any disaster to best serve the communities that are affected.

We get laser focused on our top-3 primary response agencies from Fire, EMS, and Police. However, Emergency Management Professionals will tell you that we should include more into our preparedness and response phase to better serve our communities.

Coordination will enhance

  • Asset allocation
  • Response priorities
  • Critical access
  • Reduce costs and burn rates
  • Operational coordination

These points are critical as communities deal with the initial hit of any disaster.

So no matter large or small, urban or rural, or even rich or poor – any community is vulnerable. Proper planning will help reduce the risk so that we can continue to serve those survivors who need it the most.

Also, glad to see participants getting a lot out of class and instructor enthusiasm on the importance of this Emergency Management topic.

I’d encourage you to look at your Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and realistically look at the response from Public works as they are truly a partner in our preparedness, response, and recovery of any big event or disaster.

@rusnivek

Friday Community Meeting in Monroe County

Much interest in today’s Community Meeting on updates for the Recovery phase here in Monroe County. HUGE turnout tonight.


Keeping things together as we at FEMA continue to support our local partners like the Monroe County Emergency Management Director Marty.

Behind the scenes: Some of my Branch V Division A-team that makes the FEMA magic happen.


Media on site. Lots of questions from everyone. And yes, as the FEMA PIO, I had to step in a few times.


Reporting live from the front of the room…

@rusnivek

Public Works (ESF-3) part of the response phase #Hurricane #Harvey #Port #Arkansas #Texas #Disaster

I talk about it all the time in class – Emergency Support Function-3 (ESF-3) is an important part of our RESPONSE effort in a disaster.

Why do I talk about this all the time? Public works isn’t considered the traditional Fire or EMS or Law Enforcement….but when faced with this….

Photo credit: Gabe Hernandez (@callergabe) from Hurricane Harvey in Port Arkansas, TX – 08-26-17

Public Works’ efforts with so many various resources allow all public safety to get to affected areas.

Photo credit: Gabe Hernandez (@callergabe) from Hurricane Harvey in Port Arkansas, TX – 08-26-17

Often times, people believe public works is only for recovery and clean up. That is not true. As you can see, we clearly need them during the response phase – just to get to affected areas.

Photo credit: Gabe Hernandez (@callergabe) from Hurricane Harvey in Port Arkansas, TX – 08-26-17

Get to know your public works professionals now. They are an invaluable resource for the response phase.

@rusnivek

 

2016 National Preparedness Month at HQ in Washington DC

Can’t imagine a better place to be for 2016 National Preparedness Month…than in Washington DC!!!!!

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Yep, spending time at HQ shoring a few things up with External Affairs.

Don’t worry, I wore a suit.

My afternoon was spent at the Pentagon.

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Great to see old friends there.

Also proud to see Ready.Gov and FEMA External Affairs touting preparedness to peeps who work IN the Pentagon too.

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I am fortunate to spend time here with people who are passionate about preparedness.

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@rusnivek

 

Apps away~! #NatlPrep #free #app #tech

Final week of 2015 National Preparedness Month!

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Don’t freak out, still lots of things to do like download a bunch of free apps for your smart phone!

Here’s an example of a good app from the State of North Carolina Emergency Management Agency’s ReadyNC.

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The ReadyNC app It talks about numerous preparedness activities as well as what to do after an emergency. Download it here.

FEMA’s got a great app that you can use to reference great info on disasters and preparedness.

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Additionally you can check out their new Disaster Reporter feature, Social Hub, and get free vetted weather alerts. Download it here.

Easy way to inform others? Get out there and present/share your preparedness efforts with all your partners in public safety.

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You know the phrase: An ounce of prevention/preparedness can save…..

Don’t wait. Communicate. Make your emergency plan today.

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Download a bunch of free apps today!.

Get your Mundays over by clicking here!

@rusnivek