Apps away~! #NatlPrep #free #app #tech

Final week of 2015 National Preparedness Month!

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Don’t freak out, still lots of things to do like download a bunch of free apps for your smart phone!

Here’s an example of a good app from the State of North Carolina Emergency Management Agency’s ReadyNC.

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The ReadyNC app It talks about numerous preparedness activities as well as what to do after an emergency. Download it here.

FEMA’s got a great app that you can use to reference great info on disasters and preparedness.

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Additionally you can check out their new Disaster Reporter feature, Social Hub, and get free vetted weather alerts. Download it here.

Easy way to inform others? Get out there and present/share your preparedness efforts with all your partners in public safety.

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You know the phrase: An ounce of prevention/preparedness can save…..

Don’t wait. Communicate. Make your emergency plan today.

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Download a bunch of free apps today!.

Get your Mundays over by clicking here!

@rusnivek

Ebola treatment at Grady with CDC

Thanks to the pros at Grady on their hospitality. As you may remember, Grady was one of the first health systems to treat Ebola patients here in the United States.


Grady works closely with their partners in health at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Both agencies are in Atlanta, so it puts them in a very unique position to integrally work in specialized treatment in stopping this deadly outbreak.


Thanks again for the warm hospitality.

@rusnivek

Your image on social by monitoring your name Safety-PIO-SM-14-007

14-007: Your image on social by monitoring your name
Agency: Lakewood Fire Topic(s):         Monitoring your name/branding
Date: Fall 2014 Platform:        Twitter

Monitoring your namesake has been debated for years. But with decreased staffing and less time to do more with less, many agencies are bypassing this critical piece of community relations and image/branding. A good example is when a citizen commented on Lakewood Fire’s SUV parking.

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Everyone has a camera these days. We use them not only to capture memories and precious moments, but also for documentation and shaming. I believe Todd was going for the public safety shaming factor here. I am unsure on the previous relationship between Todd and Lakewood, but there was never a response on Twitter back to Todd. Truth be told, these days, unanswered public questions are sometimes perceived as a government agency cover-ups/issues. Similar to the “No comment” – a non-response might even be worse.

How do you monitor your agency’s name or any derivatives? Try these free services: Google Alerts, search columns in TweetDeck or Hootsuite, or frequent basic vanity searches on any search engine or social media platforms.

While Todd’s use of hashtags is fairly standard social media malarkey, a swift response with a timely and direct reply to Todd’s tweet would help stop the perception that LFD is breaking the law or even setting a bad example. Remember, social media is about digital interaction.

The response could also be a teaching point so share with your audience some insight into your normal operations with a simple message on Fire Prevention activities – like hydrant testing. And using the hashtag #FirePrevention pulls up thousands of tweets about educating the public specifically in fire safety.

An effective @reply response to Todd’s tweet could have read:

@stwrs1974 During an emergency, it’s tough to find safe parking. FYI-we also check/flush hydrants twice a year too #FirePrevention 

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You immediately address the issue directly with the citizen citing the issue.
  2. You provide insight into scene safety during an emergency.
  3. You call attention to your normal operations (in this case-hydrant flushing).
  4. You use the hashtag #FirePrevention to call attention to…well…Fire Prevention.
  5. You show the general public you care about your image and want to get the story right.

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

@rusnivek

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this file:

YourImageOnSocialByMonitoringYourName-Safety-PIO-SM-14-007

 

No matter how much your pets beg… #Preparedness2014

No matter how much they beg, minimize the amount of time your pets spend outside in severe winter weather #OHWX #Preparedness2014

KacySnow

@rusnivek

Check your vehicle preparedness kit now before this happens to you…

How is your vehicle emergency preparedness kit?

Check it out BEFORE you leave home today!

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Need some help or ideas in assembling your emergency preparedness kits? Don’t know what to put into your emergency preparedness kits? Check out these free checklists.

Stay safe peeps!

@rusnivek

Winter Storm Watch vs. Warning vs. Blizzard Warning

Avoid overexertion when shoveling snow.

Consider stretching before you begin shoveling….and PLEASE wear long pants!!!!!

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Do you know the differences between Winter Storm Watch vs. Winter Storm Warning vs. Blizzard Warning?

Winter Storm Watch: There is a possibility of a storm occurring.

Winter Storm Warning: A storm is already taking place or is expected.

Blizzard Warning: Sustained winds or frequent gusts to 35 miles per hour or greater and considerable amounts of falling or blowing snow (reduced visibility to less than a quarter mile) are expected to prevail for a period of three hours or longer.

Listen to your NOAA Weather Radio for the latest news and weather reports.

@rusnivek

Time to check your NOAA weather radio

Bad weather? Cold Weather? Want to know the weather?

Good time to check the latest #OHWX via your NOAA Weather Radio now

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And if you happen to be in the Cleveland area = 162.550mHz     SAME#039035

 

The National Weather Service (NWS) provides local weather broadcasts via NOAA Weather Radio from more than 700 transmitters nationwide. NOAA Weather Radios provide continuous broadcasts of the latest weather information from local NWS offices. Weather messages are repeated every 4 to 7 minutes, or more frequently in rapidly changing local weather, or if a nearby hazardous environmental condition exists. This service operates 24 hours a day.

@rusnivek