My well labeled mugs for coffee and hydration

Last and final day of 2020 National Preparedness Month. All the best time to talk about your kits and stuff you gotta have in case of an emergency/disaster.

If you’ve been following me for a while, you know that I am a staunch supporter of good travel mugs. My oldest mug is a Nissan Stainless mug from Japan that is about 25 years old and yes, it still keeps the coffee hot. However, I needed something that is spill proof as I usually keep things in my bellows pockets.

And the last thing I needed was to spill coffee in/on my pants.

See the source image

 

Stanley mugs that have been traveling and deploying out with me for the past 5 years. I usually carry two – one for my black coffee and the other for my water (also backup for coffee).

Best part? They have a lifetime warranty. LIFETIME BABY!  I can attest that if something breaks, Stanley has committed to replacing things for free. I’ve had several tops of the travel mugs mechanically fail from normal use. Stanley has replaced each of them immediately and for free. No question from me that they definitely stand behind their product.

It is worth noting that you should consider labeling all of your stuff. ALL of your stuff. Something that is easy to spot in a large area and unique.

Stuff gets lost or acquired or stolen….so make sure your stuff is labeled and easily identified.

I can spot my things from across a large room…even in the dark.

Hope this week’s tips helped you plan out a better kit and equipment.

Reporting live with my favorite preparedness kit…

@rusnivek

Time to check your NOAA weather radio

Bad weather? Cold Weather? Want to know the weather?

Good time to check the latest #OHWX via your NOAA Weather Radio now

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And if you happen to be in the Cleveland area = 162.550mHz     SAME#039035

 

The National Weather Service (NWS) provides local weather broadcasts via NOAA Weather Radio from more than 700 transmitters nationwide. NOAA Weather Radios provide continuous broadcasts of the latest weather information from local NWS offices. Weather messages are repeated every 4 to 7 minutes, or more frequently in rapidly changing local weather, or if a nearby hazardous environmental condition exists. This service operates 24 hours a day.

@rusnivek