National disaster or major significant event? Turn off your scheduled posts and tweets!

Quick social media note: During a national crisis/event, turn off your scheduled posts/tweets.

Last night, I watched as numerous agencies continue (or forget) to stop their auto scheduling programs last night. C’mon, I talk about that in class! If you don’t turn off your auto posts/tweets, your constituents and consumers will perceive you as being insensitive to the current events.

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After the horrific shooting at the Aurora, Colorado Theatres on 07-19-14, NRA social media team autoposted this tweet via HootSuite on 07-20-14. Tweet was viewed as inappropriate as shootings/gun violence/tragedy was the major discussion of the day. Tweet was perceived as inappropriate and insensitive.

After all, social media is about being social and talking about #trending topics right? (Think of it as a digital water cooler)

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After the Boston Bombing incident, many brands and organizations expressed thoughts and prayers for those involved in this egregious tragedy. Public perception? Simple and thoughtful.

Now I know what you are saying – “But national events don’t play any part in our daily operations.” WRONG!, your image is based on perception and being mindful or relevant to a national event will help your readers embrace your greater good.

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Now what is considered a national event? Well, that is for your organization to decide. My opinion? I would err on the side of conservative judgment.

@rusnivek

Your image on social by monitoring your name Safety-PIO-SM-14-007

14-007: Your image on social by monitoring your name
Agency: Lakewood Fire Topic(s):         Monitoring your name/branding
Date: Fall 2014 Platform:        Twitter

Monitoring your namesake has been debated for years. But with decreased staffing and less time to do more with less, many agencies are bypassing this critical piece of community relations and image/branding. A good example is when a citizen commented on Lakewood Fire’s SUV parking.

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Everyone has a camera these days. We use them not only to capture memories and precious moments, but also for documentation and shaming. I believe Todd was going for the public safety shaming factor here. I am unsure on the previous relationship between Todd and Lakewood, but there was never a response on Twitter back to Todd. Truth be told, these days, unanswered public questions are sometimes perceived as a government agency cover-ups/issues. Similar to the “No comment” – a non-response might even be worse.

How do you monitor your agency’s name or any derivatives? Try these free services: Google Alerts, search columns in TweetDeck or Hootsuite, or frequent basic vanity searches on any search engine or social media platforms.

While Todd’s use of hashtags is fairly standard social media malarkey, a swift response with a timely and direct reply to Todd’s tweet would help stop the perception that LFD is breaking the law or even setting a bad example. Remember, social media is about digital interaction.

The response could also be a teaching point so share with your audience some insight into your normal operations with a simple message on Fire Prevention activities – like hydrant testing. And using the hashtag #FirePrevention pulls up thousands of tweets about educating the public specifically in fire safety.

An effective @reply response to Todd’s tweet could have read:

@stwrs1974 During an emergency, it’s tough to find safe parking. FYI-we also check/flush hydrants twice a year too #FirePrevention 

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You immediately address the issue directly with the citizen citing the issue.
  2. You provide insight into scene safety during an emergency.
  3. You call attention to your normal operations (in this case-hydrant flushing).
  4. You use the hashtag #FirePrevention to call attention to…well…Fire Prevention.
  5. You show the general public you care about your image and want to get the story right.

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

@rusnivek

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this file:

YourImageOnSocialByMonitoringYourName-Safety-PIO-SM-14-007

 

This emergency preparedness kit multipurpose item literally sticks to everything #Prepared2014 #NatlPrep #TBT

It’s Thursday in the third week of 2014 National Preparedness Month

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

#TBT #TapeBackThursdays ? Or am I trying too hard to make fetch happen?

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Build an Emergency Kit

#18: This emergency preparedness kit multipurpose item literally sticks to everything #Prepared2014 #NatlPrep #TBT

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Before a disaster, duct tape can be used to shore up many structural components as well as loose items around the house. This includes securing windows from cracking, enhancing doors, even sealing up the cracks in case you have to shelter-in-place duct tape does a lot!

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Now duct tape has been used for a few redic things too.

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Great practical joke, but c’mon.

And trust me when I say every emergency manager has duct tape in their go kit. Therefore, you should too.

To aid in your preparedness, I would suggest having two rolls of duct tape in different colors. This way, you can distinguish your tape from others (i.e. layers) and also be able to use your duct tape as identification markers. Here’s an example of just one way to use duct tape to easily identify your stuff – my flat head ax.

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Um, I hear that the airline industry also uses duct tape for operations…I mean identification too.

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However you use duct tape, keep at least two different color rolls in each emergency preparedness kit.

It would be worth noting that the Duck Tape Headquarters is located right here in NE Ohio and of course Avon Ohio is known as the Duck Tape Capital of the World.

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During an emergency, stick together! (see what I did there?)

@rusnivek

One gallon of water per day per person – 48 bottles! #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

Midstream in the third week of 2014 National Preparedness Month.

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

Are you drowning in these preparedness tips yet?

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Build an Emergency Kit

#16: One Gallon of water per day / per person. Calculated for you = 48 bottles of water per person in your #Prepared2014 kit! #NatlPrep

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So let’s do some simple calculations now.

1 bottled water = 8 oz of water

16 ounces of water = 1 pint of water

8 pints of water = 1 gallon of water

The recommendation is that every person has a gallon of water per day per person.

*****That means you need at least 16 bottles of water per person per day.*****

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If you just whispered ERMAHGERD….then you should buy some water today.

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This one is not negotiable…get it now. A case of bottled water is relatively cheap…like $3 for a case. Cheap. Do it.

Few tips once you get your water

  • Store your cases of bottled water in a cool dark place that is low to the ground.
  • So to keep your items fresh, make sure you rotate your bottled water regularly.
  • Not only for yourself, make sure you have enough water for your family.
  • I am not brand specific. Trust me, during an emergency, you will not be brand specific either.
  • Try to keep them in the shrink-wrapped. It’ll make it easier to move when needed.
  • Try to purchase clear bottles. It will help you see what’s inside.
  • Clear water bottles also can be used to amplify/diffuse a flashlight.

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Keep in mind, during an emergency, this is a very common sight.

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So don’t let this happen to you.

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Get your preparedness kit with water together today!

@rusnivek