Your image on social by monitoring your name Safety-PIO-SM-14-007

14-007: Your image on social by monitoring your name
Agency: Lakewood Fire Topic(s):         Monitoring your name/branding
Date: Fall 2014 Platform:        Twitter

Monitoring your namesake has been debated for years. But with decreased staffing and less time to do more with less, many agencies are bypassing this critical piece of community relations and image/branding. A good example is when a citizen commented on Lakewood Fire’s SUV parking.

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Everyone has a camera these days. We use them not only to capture memories and precious moments, but also for documentation and shaming. I believe Todd was going for the public safety shaming factor here. I am unsure on the previous relationship between Todd and Lakewood, but there was never a response on Twitter back to Todd. Truth be told, these days, unanswered public questions are sometimes perceived as a government agency cover-ups/issues. Similar to the “No comment” – a non-response might even be worse.

How do you monitor your agency’s name or any derivatives? Try these free services: Google Alerts, search columns in TweetDeck or Hootsuite, or frequent basic vanity searches on any search engine or social media platforms.

While Todd’s use of hashtags is fairly standard social media malarkey, a swift response with a timely and direct reply to Todd’s tweet would help stop the perception that LFD is breaking the law or even setting a bad example. Remember, social media is about digital interaction.

The response could also be a teaching point so share with your audience some insight into your normal operations with a simple message on Fire Prevention activities – like hydrant testing. And using the hashtag #FirePrevention pulls up thousands of tweets about educating the public specifically in fire safety.

An effective @reply response to Todd’s tweet could have read:

@stwrs1974 During an emergency, it’s tough to find safe parking. FYI-we also check/flush hydrants twice a year too #FirePrevention 

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You immediately address the issue directly with the citizen citing the issue.
  2. You provide insight into scene safety during an emergency.
  3. You call attention to your normal operations (in this case-hydrant flushing).
  4. You use the hashtag #FirePrevention to call attention to…well…Fire Prevention.
  5. You show the general public you care about your image and want to get the story right.

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

@rusnivek

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this file:

YourImageOnSocialByMonitoringYourName-Safety-PIO-SM-14-007

 

Test em if you got em! #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

It’s Friday in the fourth week of 2014 National Preparedness Month.

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

Ahhh, Aloha Fridays!

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Practice for an emergency

#26: Are ALL your emergency flashlights working? Test em if you got em! #Prepared2014 #NatlPrep

Since it’s a beautiful day, I would be a great day to test all your flashlights.

A few weeks ago, I talked about having flashlights in case of an emergency. Now would be the time to test and make sure each flashlight is in working condition.

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Don’t forget about your helmet lights too!

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And for my friends in the law enforcement world, don’t forget to check all your weapon lights too.

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*I also had to change the batteries in my EOTech too.

Your preparedness actions now will definitely save you time during an emergency.

Reminder again, throw away all candles. Candles are dangerous and can start fires. Flashlights are WAY better for lighting.

Happy Aloha Friday everyone!

@rusnivek

Flashlights keeps your family together after a disaster #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

Rainy/gloomy Saturday, and I’m closing out the first week of 2014 National Preparedness Month!

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

Saturday Stuff right?

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Reconnect with Family After a Disaster.

#6: Have at least two (2) flashlights w/ batteries to help navigate in the dark & keep your family together #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

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Pictured above is just one of the three flashlights that I keep in my everyday bag.

Reconnecting with my family after a disaster means that I have preparedness items for them too. It would be worth noting that each flashlight uses the same type of batteries and all operate/function the same (rear push button and twist-on action). This brand and similar power source compatibility allows everyone to have the same gear.

2 is 1 and one is none right? Well, I guess in this case, it’s 3 is 1 and one is none.

For those inquiring on my equipment specifics, I have a Surefire M2 Centurion, a Surefire A2 Aviator, and a Surefire G2 Nitrolon.

Also, a simple red tape marking allows us to easily identify what equipment is ours.

At night, a great flashlight allow you to quickly identify your family members amongst the sea of cheap weaker flashlights in the neighborhood. Trust me, at night, you want the best most powerful flashlights around.

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So have flashlights and batteries ready for all members of your family.

Keeping tools ready for your family is another important parts of keeping your family together during and after a disaster.

@rusnivek