Day-2 of the FEMA Basic PIO Course here in KY

Day-2 of the FEMA Basic Public Information Officer Course here.

Glad to finally meet Lexington Fire Capt Jessica Bowman who is also one of the FEMA Master PIOs.

Great day to share some of the tools we use as PIOs. Here’s Sherelle and John talking about the importance and fashionable safety vests are for officials onscene.

Additionally, we discussed media being well visible as their safety is incredibly important. We can’t have our friends in the news business get hurt or become part of the incident.

And trust me, the more people who get injured in an incident, the more paperwork we all have to fill out….so be safe!

As usual, we had a very seasoned media panel from WLEX18 Bill Wilcox and Herald Leader Peter Baniak. Many thanks to both news organizations to spend time out of their busy schedule to spend with PIOs from across the state.

With all Basic PIO classes, we talk about the ability and flexibility for PIOs to do field reporting. Often times, reporters can’t get to a scene because of traffic or lack of staffing. Either way, we as government PIOs can help them out by packaging information they need from the scene. The tools needed to produce this kind of info is fairly easy to get, however the challenge is to put them into play.

By sharing the tactics and tools in class, I am able to improve the skills of any PIO by enhancing their ability to share solid timely and TRUSTED information with any of the targeted audiences.

As PIOs, we are beholden to so many audiences.

  • Public
  • Media
  • Leadership
  • Our internal teams.

At times, our job seems easy however once you dive into it, you can see the complexities of our efforts.

Don’t worry, we reviewed all mock on camera interviews. Tackled key concepts like redirects as well as some tips on how to give more positive non-verbals while being interviewed during crisis.

Super fun day with everyone. Lots of contributions from our partners from Fire, EMS, Police, Emergency Management, Energy, Coroner’s Office, Higher Education, Search and Rescue.

Looking forward to tomorrow’s FEMA JIC/JIS course!

Reporting live from the EOC….

@rusnviek

Morning briefing with FEMA #USAR IN-TF-1 #PA-TF-1 #CA

Starting my morning off with a quick briefing from the FEMA Indiana USAR big daddy….

Ladies and gents, put your hands together for the world famous WTFD Captain….FIRE MIKE!


MICHAEL PRUITT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Seriously, just glad to see a familiar face in the disaster.

@rusnivek

FEMA Support for Hurricane Harvey response including key safety messages

Key Safety Messages:

  • Continue to listen to local officials.
  • Only call 911 if you have an immediate need for medical attention or evacuation assistance.
    • If you can’t get through to 911 on first try, keep calling.
    • Another option is to place a call to one of five numbers for the Houston Command Center of the United States Coast Guard. The numbers are:
      • 281-464-4851
      • 281-464-4852
      • 281-464-4853
      • 281-464-4854
      • 282-464-4855
  • Don’t drive on flooded roadways. Remember – turn around, don’t drown.
  • If you are in a high rise building and need to shelter in place, go to the first or second floor hallways or interior rooms. You want to stay on floors above floodwater or storm surge, but do not go to the highest floors due to wind impacts.
  • If you are under a tornado warning, seek shelter immediately in the center of a small interior room (closet, interior hallway) on the lowest level of a sturdy building. Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside.

 

@rusnivek

 

Final day of the AH #IMT #Logistics Section Chief course w/ OH-TF-01

Day-5: Final day of the DHS/FEMA Ohio EMA All-Hazards Incident Management Team Logistics Section Chief course.

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Again, special thanks to FEMA USAR Ohio Task Force-1 for hosting this week.

Solid morning as we talked about how the LSC frequently meets with the PSC well before much of the action happens.

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In fact, it is likely that the LSC is at least 5 steps ahead of the OSC – to plan to supply and equip our tactical operations with the stuff they need.

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Ohio EMA LSC Phil Johnson brief the class on how county agencies interact with our activated State EOC focusing in on resource ordering and task assignments.

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Like good Logistics Section Chiefs, we debated the merits of pre-staging resources before they are needed for faster deployments and anticipating needs (leaning in).

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Lots of discussion on EMAC and the success that the State of Ohio had with 2016 events including the 2016 Republican National Convention which was classified as a NSSE.

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We discussed demobilization plans as well as factors that could contribute to delayed demob. As always, we emphasize on the safe return of all crews from disaster deployment.

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At the end of the day, we were able to tour the DHS/FEMA USAR OH-TF-1 facility.

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Amazing stuff!

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Logistics plays a HUGE part of daily operations as they have thousands and thousands of pieces of deployable items needed for disaster operations.

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So as you can see, LSCs have an insurmountable task of keeping order during non-disaster times.

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For those in the military and are truly Logistics pees, I believe this is an amazing piece of equipment.

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If you are a pro, and like to sling load your stuff, you should consider getting a few.

Special thanks to all the pros from DHS/FEMA Ohio USAR Task Force-1.

Yes it's Friday. That is an Aloha Shirt.

Yes it’s Friday. Look closely. That is an Aloha Shirt.

Superb ending of class with participants from numerous states on this #AlohaFriday!

Proud to serve my country and train other IMT LSCs from across this great nation.

@rusnivek

 

#AlohaFriday for paperwork and meetings at OhioEMA

On this #AlohaFriday – I report to the OEMA mother ship!

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I had to take care of some TPSReports for ICS classes. Talked about upcoming October/November schedules with both SAAs on a few ICS-300 and ICS-400 about registration issues as well as my packed IMT class for FEMA’s USAR Ohio Task Force-1 (OH-TF-1).

I was fortunate to visit with good friends Jerry and Sima. Hilarious!

Lots of discussion on the RNC as well as National Preparedness Month.

And yes, all done with the Aloha Shirt on.

@rusnivek

 

Spelling is algorithmically important for LinkedIn-Safety-PIO-SM-15-006

15-006: Spelling is algorithmically important for LinkedIn
Agency: LinkedIn platform Topic(s):       LinkedIn, Spelling
Date: 10-30-15 Platform:       LinkedIn

I have been asked to connect with many of you on LinkedIn. However, it is worth knowing that all Fortune 500 companies use LinkedIn as a recruiting and verification tool so subsequently spelling your actual job title correctly is a good start for the automated systems to match your account.

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I get everyone is busy with lots to do. But glaring errors like this are avoidable and as a manager, drove me to reject applications citing inconsistencies in work, history, and documentation.

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Look, I don’t have the best spelling either. In fact, I’d blame some of my spelling miscues to #DYAC – but LinkedIn is NOT the place where you are allowed to make these errors.

Just think how detrimental it would be to abbreviate the word Assistant (“Asst”) and forget the “t” – dangerous especially when the HR hiring algorithm forever excludes you from all remaining searches because of vulgarity.

Important four things:

1. Spelling your job title correctly is important.

2. Correct spelling will allow more matches when companies use job algorithms.

3. If you connect, the requesting connection’s spelling error will appear on your timeline to ALL your connections.

4. Spelling errors are a reflection of your professional work.

As a Friday afternoon activity – I’m going to check my LinkedIn account for spelling errors now.

A simple but important factor to remember when using LinkedIn – a professional social media platform for your career and growth.

Time is short, so post (and spell) good stuff!

@rusnivek

Or download the one-pager: LinkedIn-spelling-keywordsearches-Safety-PIO-SM-15-006

 

Breaking search news…I mean Insta News

Breaking news…I mean Insta News.

Instagram now has a search bar function on their web platform.

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This means you can search for accounts, hashtags, terms, etc….from the search bar on top of their web platform. Also makes it easier for those that serve (in an analyst role) to find stuff.

Similar functions currently do exist on Facebook and Twitter.

This is just another tool that we can use to better improve our Insta skillz. Yep, that’s your skillz with a Z.

Time is short, so Gram good stuff.

@rusnivek

 

Twitter is now tracking all other apps too! Freaked out?

So…this just happened to me.

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Twitter will now track the activities from all your OTHER apps on your smart phone/tablet.

That’s right, Twitter will use:

  • your FourSquare/Swarm geolocation data to target you for ads.
  • your pictures to see what you take pictures of to target you for ads.
  • your songs to see what music you listen to so they can target you for ads
  • your Instagram photos to see who likes them so they can target ads to them.
  • your airlines apps so they can serve you targeted ads on your flights
  • your phone calls to see who/where you call so they can target ads to you/them.

You get the idea.

Yeowza Twitter.

From Twitter’s EULA: “…collecting and occasionally updating the list of apps installed on your mobile device so we can deliver tailored content that you might be interested in.”

Creeped out? You know you can disable this feature through the Twitter app’s settings menu. Depending on the iOS:

  • For iOS device users: disable this through setting —> account -> privacy -> Tailor Twitter based on my apps.
  • For Android users: settings -> account -> other ->Tailor Twitter based on my apps.

I get that Twitter would like to collect data with what I do using in the Twitter app. In fact, I expect it. However, I am a bit uncomfortable with Twitter collecting info from various other apps.

Not cool Twitter. Way to be that creepy Uncle.

@rusnivek

 

Your image on social by monitoring your name Safety-PIO-SM-14-007

14-007: Your image on social by monitoring your name
Agency: Lakewood Fire Topic(s):         Monitoring your name/branding
Date: Fall 2014 Platform:        Twitter

Monitoring your namesake has been debated for years. But with decreased staffing and less time to do more with less, many agencies are bypassing this critical piece of community relations and image/branding. A good example is when a citizen commented on Lakewood Fire’s SUV parking.

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Everyone has a camera these days. We use them not only to capture memories and precious moments, but also for documentation and shaming. I believe Todd was going for the public safety shaming factor here. I am unsure on the previous relationship between Todd and Lakewood, but there was never a response on Twitter back to Todd. Truth be told, these days, unanswered public questions are sometimes perceived as a government agency cover-ups/issues. Similar to the “No comment” – a non-response might even be worse.

How do you monitor your agency’s name or any derivatives? Try these free services: Google Alerts, search columns in TweetDeck or Hootsuite, or frequent basic vanity searches on any search engine or social media platforms.

While Todd’s use of hashtags is fairly standard social media malarkey, a swift response with a timely and direct reply to Todd’s tweet would help stop the perception that LFD is breaking the law or even setting a bad example. Remember, social media is about digital interaction.

The response could also be a teaching point so share with your audience some insight into your normal operations with a simple message on Fire Prevention activities – like hydrant testing. And using the hashtag #FirePrevention pulls up thousands of tweets about educating the public specifically in fire safety.

An effective @reply response to Todd’s tweet could have read:

@stwrs1974 During an emergency, it’s tough to find safe parking. FYI-we also check/flush hydrants twice a year too #FirePrevention 

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You immediately address the issue directly with the citizen citing the issue.
  2. You provide insight into scene safety during an emergency.
  3. You call attention to your normal operations (in this case-hydrant flushing).
  4. You use the hashtag #FirePrevention to call attention to…well…Fire Prevention.
  5. You show the general public you care about your image and want to get the story right.

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

@rusnivek

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this file:

YourImageOnSocialByMonitoringYourName-Safety-PIO-SM-14-007