Sunday streamlining our JIC Ops

Sunday is off to a bang as we need some formality to the process. Revamp what? What does that mean?

<Cue the Hawaiian music in the JIC because we are going to revamp a few things today.>

1. We are going to take a look at the press releases and move them to media alerts…because no one reads press releases anymore. Let’s not waste time and align it to be more factual and numbers. From a PIO perspective, this “trending” is what news outlets are looking for. Big upticks/spikes in numbers.

And in this situation, I doubt they are concentrating at the minutia of individual numbers esp since they are projected to dramatically increase over the next few weeks.

2. Accountability must be improved as we got the formal FEMA Disaster Declaration under the Stafford Act. So everyone gets a T-card and everyone must fill out an ICS-214. That includes me too.

3. Don’t forget to sign in on the ICS-211 form and your T-card is good to go.

4. Get a hard copy of the IAP and read through it. Don’t get caught not knowing the current plan. Maybe…MAYBE use those fancy tactical cargo pockets to hold your IAP (I’m judging).

5. Daily morning briefs with your PIOs….we call them our PIO roll call. Not longer than 10 minutes, allows us to get a handle on our daily activities and allows us to coordinate with each other. SA/COP baby!

I hate to break the news to you but the PIO’s job isn’t easy. So much more work goes behind the scenes and talking on camera is really about 5% of the job. Your main bread and butter work comes from the preparation and planning that goes into that.

Additionally, most reporters aren’t going to catch you live and want to do interviews. This new fangled invention called the cell phone makes it easy to communicate with all your reporters.

I honestly can’t tell you how many phone calls and interviews I did standing in my garage at 11p at night.

Yep, it never ends.

Get some sleep peeps, it’s going to be a long week ahead.

@rusnivek

Day-4 of the DHS/FEMA AH NIMS ICS IMT IC Course at OEMA

Day-4 of the DHS/FEMA All Hazards NIMS ICS IMT Incident Commander course here at Ohio EMA.


Lots of sharing of ideas esp from our partners from the US Foresty Division.


Obviously, they deal with large incidents all the time – esp this year being an already busy wildfire year.


Additionally, talking about the entire Command and General Staff and how they interact with all other positions are key to formulating a successful team.


Just glad we have everyone contributing to the conversation.

Lots of passionate people wanting every community to work together and succeed.

@rusnivek

Day-3 of FEMA IMT IC Course #NationalSelfieDay 

Day-3 of the FEMA #IMT Incident Commander course at Ohio EMA!

Lots to discuss esp transfer of command and planning Ps.


Also, today is NationalSelfieDay!


Bonus for the pink tie too #WeWearPinkOnWednesdays

@rusnivek

Day-1 of IMT Incident Commander course at OEMA

Morning Ohio EMA! #Mothership


Welcome to the first day of NIMS ICS Incident Management Team Incident Commander course!


Got a quick welcome from Ohio EMA Training & Exercise David Nunley.


Lots to discuss including responsibilities, leadership, and of course paperwork (ICS forms).

Great first day with participants from Ohio, New Mexico, Oregon, and Georgia with tons to digest in all the slides.


Lots.


Channeling my inner Patrick.

Looking forward to tomorrow!

@rusnivek

May we head into June 2017?

May is out like trout and June has come in with a slew of activities as well as the 2017 NBA Finals!

First week I’ll be in Missouri teaching my favorite class – Social Media Tools & Techniques and a functional social media exercise in Columbus. Yes I know, that means I won’t be attending the 2017 UASI Conference in Buffalo. #Boooo. However, my free time will be spent at Game-3 and Game-4 of the 2017 NBA Championships. #GoCavs!!!!!

Second week I will be teaching the FEMA EMI Incident Management Team Plans Section Chief Course in Cincinnati. With so many members from USAR Ohio Task Force-1 (including Schulmann) attending, it’s going to be a fun class. Are you attending?

Third week I think I got blessed with the approval to take the IMT Incident Commanders course at the home EOC in Columbus. Lemme see if I can login this time (Password “JOSHUA”).

Fourth week will be doing some tactical training including quals. #pewpew

Honestly, I just hope to stay afloat this month.

Additionally, June 2017 will serve as the foundation month for the 2018 training schedule. Who’s ready for more classes?!?!?!?

Get your learn on!

@rusnivek

 

Whoa, that went well… #AlohaFriday

Whoa….whoa…..whoa……

After getting reassigned from the JIC to the FCO, I was evaluated on my performance.

 

So yeah, that went well.


Great to support the FCO as well as the FEMA Region-1 Incident Management Team (IMAT) this week.


Trust me, without the support of countless PIOs and numerous External Affairs peeps, we could not have accomplished our tasks assigned.


My hope is that we continue to increase our knowledge and expand on ways that we can serve each of our communities daily as well as during any disaster or emergency.

We must relentlessly pursue knowledge from educators who are willing to share their craft with others.


Listen to all of our communities and share kernels of knowledge with others in an open forum so that other PIOs can learn and make good decisions.


It is incumbent upon us to coordinate the response effort for those who have nothing.

And most importantly, it is our duty to serve this great nation.

 

Demobing now. 

Great week. 

@rusnivek

 

Final day of the AH #IMT #Logistics Section Chief course w/ OH-TF-01

Day-5: Final day of the DHS/FEMA Ohio EMA All-Hazards Incident Management Team Logistics Section Chief course.

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Again, special thanks to FEMA USAR Ohio Task Force-1 for hosting this week.

Solid morning as we talked about how the LSC frequently meets with the PSC well before much of the action happens.

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In fact, it is likely that the LSC is at least 5 steps ahead of the OSC – to plan to supply and equip our tactical operations with the stuff they need.

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Ohio EMA LSC Phil Johnson brief the class on how county agencies interact with our activated State EOC focusing in on resource ordering and task assignments.

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Like good Logistics Section Chiefs, we debated the merits of pre-staging resources before they are needed for faster deployments and anticipating needs (leaning in).

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Lots of discussion on EMAC and the success that the State of Ohio had with 2016 events including the 2016 Republican National Convention which was classified as a NSSE.

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We discussed demobilization plans as well as factors that could contribute to delayed demob. As always, we emphasize on the safe return of all crews from disaster deployment.

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At the end of the day, we were able to tour the DHS/FEMA USAR OH-TF-1 facility.

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Amazing stuff!

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Logistics plays a HUGE part of daily operations as they have thousands and thousands of pieces of deployable items needed for disaster operations.

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So as you can see, LSCs have an insurmountable task of keeping order during non-disaster times.

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For those in the military and are truly Logistics pees, I believe this is an amazing piece of equipment.

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If you are a pro, and like to sling load your stuff, you should consider getting a few.

Special thanks to all the pros from DHS/FEMA Ohio USAR Task Force-1.

Yes it's Friday. That is an Aloha Shirt.

Yes it’s Friday. Look closely. That is an Aloha Shirt.

Superb ending of class with participants from numerous states on this #AlohaFriday!

Proud to serve my country and train other IMT LSCs from across this great nation.

@rusnivek

 

Many in government did NOT yield to standard NIMS ICS principles today

Lots of discussion around the speech from Benjamin Netanyahu today.

I mean, lots of ICS violations from the speech today.

My POVs:

1. Only the Incident Commander should brief his G&GSF.

2. LOFRs need to pay better attention to on site VIP visits and make sure it doesn’t disrupt Ops.

3. Other agency reps or SMEs should submit comms approval on messages through the LOFR. IC approval is a must.

4. IC and PSC should be primary on the SMART Objectives. TFs or STs or Single resources should not be weighing in on strategic direction.

5. Play here in your own sandbox. We got bigger national issues to worry about.

In case you needed a NIMS ICS-207 review

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@rusnivek

Technical jargon and giving actionable information Safety-PIO-SM-14-006

14-006: Technical jargon and giving actionable information
Agency: Chicago Fire Department Topic(s): Industry codes / Actionable info
Date: Fall 2014 Platform: Twitter

Industry speak or technical jargon is part of what we do every day. But using technical terms on a social media platform will be confusing to those who are NOT in the fire service. That’s what the Chicago Fire Department did yesterday at their big 3-alarm fire when they tweeted technical jargon.

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The use of technical jargon is rampant in emergency services but when speaking to the media or the general public, we need to remember that everyone did not grow up with a VOX alarm or SCU tones. In this case, a “311” or 3-11 alarm means that there are 11 engines, 5 Trucks, 2 Tower Ladders, 6 Battalion Chiefs, 1 Rescue Squad, 2 Ambulances, 2 Paramedic Chiefs, Deputy District Chief, Deputy Fire Commissioner, and the 1st Deputy Fire Commissioner are onscene. There is no way to include all that information in a tweet, but using more simple terms will help your audience understand the scale of your ongoing incident.

Before you post images, make sure your pictures are rotated correctly. I know accuracy is sometimes overlooked in lieu of speed, but it takes less than 5 seconds to orientate/rotate a picture (In this case, it was going to be a long operation). And note, by just rotating a picture does not equate that you are “doctoring up” photos. But a correctly posted photo will help media repost and format your information quicker to the masses.

During an emergency situation, your constituents need the information pushes to be actionable and specific to your audience. Not only inform them of the danger, but tell them what they can do about it.

A more effective tweet could have read:

Chicago Fire: Large 3-alarm fire at Harrison St x Fifth Ave. Traffic delays-avoid the area. (insert two pictures)

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You cite the authority having jurisdiction and established incident command presence.
  2. You generally described the size/category of the ongoing incident and critical information to media.
  3. You identify the exact location of the incident.
  4. You describe the delays in the area and give actionable information to your constituents.
  5. You still have lots of room to push properly orientated pictures with your informational tweet.

 

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

@rusnivek

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this file:

TechnicalJargonAndGivingActionableInformation-Safety-PIO-SM-14-006

LODD Captain Bowen’s Story by Randy Mantooth #Firefighter

Definitely a worthwhile video to watch pertaining to the Asheville Fire Department Captain Jeff Bowen Line Of Duty Death (LODD) in 2011.

http://vimeo.com/101231318

*Personal note: Capt Bowen was one of my students in my Firefighter class.

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Video produced by Randy Mantooth and sponsored by Masimo.

Jeff: Keep an eye out for all of us at the elevated IC.

@rusnivek