Day-1 of IMT Incident Commander course at OEMA

Morning Ohio EMA! #Mothership


Welcome to the first day of NIMS ICS Incident Management Team Incident Commander course!


Got a quick welcome from Ohio EMA Training & Exercise David Nunley.


Lots to discuss including responsibilities, leadership, and of course paperwork (ICS forms).

Great first day with participants from Ohio, New Mexico, Oregon, and Georgia with tons to digest in all the slides.


Lots.


Channeling my inner Patrick.

Looking forward to tomorrow!

@rusnivek

Ohio Statewide Amber Alert on a Sunday from Licking County #FathersDay

AMBER Alert on #FathersDay – not a good afternoon.


Not only do you get email notification…


…social media picked up on it right away…


…EAS Alerts go off to everyone in the proximity…


…and roadside signs instantly broadcast the same message.

Where and why did AMBER Alert first start?

The AMBER Alert System began in 1996 when Dallas-Fort Worth broadcasters teamed with local police to develop an early warning system to help find abducted children. AMBER stands for America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response and was created as a legacy to 9-year-old Amber Hagerman, who was kidnapped while riding her bicycle in Arlington, Texas, and then brutally murdered. Other states and communities soon set up their own AMBER plans as the idea was adopted across the nation.

How does it work?

Once law enforcement has determined that a child has been abducted and the abduction meets AMBER Alert criteria, law enforcement notifies broadcasters and state transportation officials. AMBER Alerts interrupt regular programming and are broadcast on radio and television and DOT highway signs. AMBER Alerts can also be re-disseminated through lottery, digital billboards, Internet Ad exchanges, Internet Service Providers, Internet search engines, as well as wireless devices such as mobile phones.

How effective has it been?

As of December 23, 2015 there have been 800 children rescued and returned specifically because of AMBER Alert. AMBER Alerts also serve as deterrents to those who would prey upon our children. AMBER Alert cases have shown that some perpetrators release the abducted child after hearing the AMBER Alert.

Do not ignore these Amber Alerts.
Be aware of your surroundings.

Look out for your neighbors.

Read the alert, call if you see something/someone matching the description and make your community safer.

@rusnivek

 

 

 

*****************Update as of 06-18-17 at 19:38*****************

Child was found safe. Keiria Marie Trent girl was found safe with a relative.

Thank you for participating in the Ohio AMBER Alert.

**END**

 

It’s still 2017 National Public Safety Telecommunicator week!

It’s still not too late – 2017 National Public Safety Telecommunicator week!

***Sunday April 9th through Saturday April 15th***

Pictured below is still my favorite dispatch picture that depicts how hard their job truly is.

If you have ever sat in a dispatch center for any amount of time, you know how difficult their job really is.

Thank your dispatchers today!

@rusnivek

 

National Telecommunicators Week 2016: April 10th – 16th

It’s National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week 2016 (April 10th-16th)!

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If you ever sat in a 9-1-1 call center/dispatch center, you know how difficult the job is for every one of these professionals.

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I encourage you to take a moment to thank the voice on the other end of the radio.

@rusnivek

 

Technical jargon and giving actionable information Safety-PIO-SM-14-006

14-006: Technical jargon and giving actionable information
Agency: Chicago Fire Department Topic(s): Industry codes / Actionable info
Date: Fall 2014 Platform: Twitter

Industry speak or technical jargon is part of what we do every day. But using technical terms on a social media platform will be confusing to those who are NOT in the fire service. That’s what the Chicago Fire Department did yesterday at their big 3-alarm fire when they tweeted technical jargon.

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The use of technical jargon is rampant in emergency services but when speaking to the media or the general public, we need to remember that everyone did not grow up with a VOX alarm or SCU tones. In this case, a “311” or 3-11 alarm means that there are 11 engines, 5 Trucks, 2 Tower Ladders, 6 Battalion Chiefs, 1 Rescue Squad, 2 Ambulances, 2 Paramedic Chiefs, Deputy District Chief, Deputy Fire Commissioner, and the 1st Deputy Fire Commissioner are onscene. There is no way to include all that information in a tweet, but using more simple terms will help your audience understand the scale of your ongoing incident.

Before you post images, make sure your pictures are rotated correctly. I know accuracy is sometimes overlooked in lieu of speed, but it takes less than 5 seconds to orientate/rotate a picture (In this case, it was going to be a long operation). And note, by just rotating a picture does not equate that you are “doctoring up” photos. But a correctly posted photo will help media repost and format your information quicker to the masses.

During an emergency situation, your constituents need the information pushes to be actionable and specific to your audience. Not only inform them of the danger, but tell them what they can do about it.

A more effective tweet could have read:

Chicago Fire: Large 3-alarm fire at Harrison St x Fifth Ave. Traffic delays-avoid the area. (insert two pictures)

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You cite the authority having jurisdiction and established incident command presence.
  2. You generally described the size/category of the ongoing incident and critical information to media.
  3. You identify the exact location of the incident.
  4. You describe the delays in the area and give actionable information to your constituents.
  5. You still have lots of room to push properly orientated pictures with your informational tweet.

 

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

@rusnivek

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this file:

TechnicalJargonAndGivingActionableInformation-Safety-PIO-SM-14-006