Hi Unique you dropped your phone #PIO #SocialMedia

Law enforcement has been in some tough situations. Most recently, social media has been credited with engaging the public.

In fact, some agencies have used social media to engage suspects who may leave items behind on a scene of a crime. Oooooo, evidence!

But this is not one of those cases.

On 07-04-18, this image was initially shared on Facebook then across various social media platforms.

The image with caption inferring that local law enforcement agency was pursuing the suspect and that the suspect dropped his/her cell phone while eluding law enforcement. Then, in order to reach out to the suspect and friends of the suspect, local law enforcement uses the suspect’s social media account to reach out and taunt.

While funny for public safety, we as trusting public safety pros need to take time to dispel rumors and verify facts. PIOs should be at the front line of this issue.

And yes, this post was actually fake. What the whut?

Here’s Chicago Police PIO Anthony Guglielmi’s response to this post gone viral.

Sooooooo, to recap:

  • The initial Facebook post was not associated to incident.
  • Image was borrowed from unrelated event.
  • LEOs were not involved in pursuit of suspect.
  • Law enforcement agencies are usually professional.
  • PIO was on it and addressed concern once information was vetted w/ 7th District.
  • Squashed viral post with real information. #truth

Well done CPD PIO!

Again, as PIOs we are the shepherds of our agency when it comes to reporting the facts and dispelling the rumors.

We as PIOs must remain vigilant and dispel rumors as soon as they appear. This is your job. The agency’s reputation is on the line so ensure the longevity and be cognizant of your agency’s image 24/7.

@rusnivek

Supporting infrastructure today #NEORSD

Slight change of PIO plans today as I was initially assigned to ESF-13 (Law Enforcement) – I have been reallocated to support infrastructure.

So today, I spent some time with the NorthEast Ohio Regional Sewer District, their PIO/Outreach team, and WallyWaterDrop.

WallyWaterDrop and Jessica from NEORSD sharing important safety tips and stickers with everyone..

Great outreach event with Parent Magazine and with so many from our local area.

Also had a chance to pop a quick Periscope live video too.

Nice work Jen Elting!

Here’s a behind the scenes action shot (aka “making the magic happen”).

PIOs in action! (L to R: K. Sur, WallyWaterDrop, and J. Elting) PC: Chief J. Brewington

Great day to support our partners in public safety esp our PIO pros at NEORSD are an invaluable resource.

Fortunately, there was a Starbucks close by…so you know. #hydration

PIO + Coffee = Happy! PC: Chief J. Brewington

Reporting live with some Starbucks…

@rusnivek

2016 National Preparedness Month at HQ in Washington DC

Can’t imagine a better place to be for 2016 National Preparedness Month…than in Washington DC!!!!!

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Yep, spending time at HQ shoring a few things up with External Affairs.

Don’t worry, I wore a suit.

My afternoon was spent at the Pentagon.

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Great to see old friends there.

Also proud to see Ready.Gov and FEMA External Affairs touting preparedness to peeps who work IN the Pentagon too.

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I am fortunate to spend time here with people who are passionate about preparedness.

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@rusnivek

 

Technical jargon and giving actionable information Safety-PIO-SM-14-006

14-006: Technical jargon and giving actionable information
Agency: Chicago Fire Department Topic(s): Industry codes / Actionable info
Date: Fall 2014 Platform: Twitter

Industry speak or technical jargon is part of what we do every day. But using technical terms on a social media platform will be confusing to those who are NOT in the fire service. That’s what the Chicago Fire Department did yesterday at their big 3-alarm fire when they tweeted technical jargon.

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The use of technical jargon is rampant in emergency services but when speaking to the media or the general public, we need to remember that everyone did not grow up with a VOX alarm or SCU tones. In this case, a “311” or 3-11 alarm means that there are 11 engines, 5 Trucks, 2 Tower Ladders, 6 Battalion Chiefs, 1 Rescue Squad, 2 Ambulances, 2 Paramedic Chiefs, Deputy District Chief, Deputy Fire Commissioner, and the 1st Deputy Fire Commissioner are onscene. There is no way to include all that information in a tweet, but using more simple terms will help your audience understand the scale of your ongoing incident.

Before you post images, make sure your pictures are rotated correctly. I know accuracy is sometimes overlooked in lieu of speed, but it takes less than 5 seconds to orientate/rotate a picture (In this case, it was going to be a long operation). And note, by just rotating a picture does not equate that you are “doctoring up” photos. But a correctly posted photo will help media repost and format your information quicker to the masses.

During an emergency situation, your constituents need the information pushes to be actionable and specific to your audience. Not only inform them of the danger, but tell them what they can do about it.

A more effective tweet could have read:

Chicago Fire: Large 3-alarm fire at Harrison St x Fifth Ave. Traffic delays-avoid the area. (insert two pictures)

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You cite the authority having jurisdiction and established incident command presence.
  2. You generally described the size/category of the ongoing incident and critical information to media.
  3. You identify the exact location of the incident.
  4. You describe the delays in the area and give actionable information to your constituents.
  5. You still have lots of room to push properly orientated pictures with your informational tweet.

 

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

@rusnivek

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this file:

TechnicalJargonAndGivingActionableInformation-Safety-PIO-SM-14-006

My day at the White House #WHSMEM #SURINDC #DisasterTech

The top Emergency Managers from across the country were invited to the White House on Tuesday July 29, 2014 for the White House Innovation for Disaster Response and Recovery Initiative. I am so fortunate to be invited to this momentous event.

The best-of-the-best Emergency Management officials met with leaders from the technology industry to discuss tools and general methods being used during disasters.

Wait, did you say the White House invited Kevin Sur? Yes. Official invite to the White House. Check!

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#OMG – #Holycow.

The event was coordinated by The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), and The National Security Council (NSC). This event will bring together technologists, entrepreneurs, and members of the disaster response community to showcase tools that will make a tangible impact in the lives of survivors of large-scale emergencies. The White House Innovation for Disaster Response and Recovery Initiative was first launched by the Administration in the wake of Hurricane Sandy to find the most effective ways technology can empower survivors, first responders, and local, state, tribal, territorial, and Federal government with critical information and resources.

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Waiting in line to go through security was quite boring, but since I was with all the top Social Media Emergency Management peeps…it was only appropriate for us to take one of these.

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(From L to R) @schuback @sct_r @CherylBle @MaryJoFly @ENeitzel @rusnivek

#WHSMEM #SURINDC #DisasterTech

The morning was filled with 5 different workshops. I was selected to attend the User-Centered Design workshop that was to identify challenges where innovation can improve community preparedness and resilience.

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Great discussion amongst peers from all over the county including my friend Alicia Johnson (@UrbanAreaAlicia) who highlighted the San Francisco Department of Emergency Management new program SF72.

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My takeaways from the morning workshops? We need to continually evaluate the preparedness efforts in each community as there is no constant. Aside from quantifying preparedness (which is almost virtually impossible), we need to seek alternate ways to better serve our communities including ones who have distinct challenges.

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I have 3 specific items that I need to work on: Community Preparedness Evaluation tool/matrix, a tiered plan to reward “preparedness”, and Preparedness pack program. More on these possible programs later.

After a quick lunch, we headed to the main conference room.

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Before the event started, former FEMA Deputy Director Richard Serino and I were cracking jokes at dinner last night…so he decided to sit behind me and continue to poke fun/make jokes. So since he’s a tech guy, we decided on a #selfie to commemorate our time at the White House.

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If you ever get the chance to meet Rich in real life (IRL)…you should. He’s awesome.

Side note: As we were about to start, all of our mobile devices and cell phones were having small connectivity issues. I think I figured it out first…Marine-1 was inbound to the WH with POTUS for his press briefing on the South Lawn regarding the issues in Gaza.

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Back to our #DisasterTech event!

Senior Advisor to the White House CTO Brian Forde started out the afternoon session.

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And since this was a technology event, it was the US Chief Technology Officer Todd Park who gave the opening remarks. Additionally, the new DHS FEMA Assoc Admininstrator Joe Nimmich gave the keynote speech.

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Numerous Federal agencies and private companies presented their latest tools and apps that have been used. CTO Tony Surma from Microsoft Disaster Response who discussed the information they used from the Boston Bombing.

Side bar: Later in the afternoon, I got a chance to talk one-on-one to the folks from Boston regarding their response. Inspiring stories in the face of adversity…

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VP of Technology Kevin Busque from TaskRabbit and the Director of Public Policy and Civic Partnerships Molly Turner from Airbnb and my friends from San Francisco and Portland.

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Nice work Alicia!

Director of Public Policy and Market Development Padden Murphy from Getround, Technology Lead, NGA readiness, Response, and Recovery Group Raymond Bauer from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGIA), and Deputy Assistant Secretary William Bryan from the US Department of Energy (DOE) talking about the Lantern Live program.

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Government Partnerships Manager Ryan Mannion, SeeClick Fix, Associate Director for Natural Hazards Dr David Applegate from the US Geological Survey, Associate Division Director Dr. Paul Lemieux from the National Homeland Security Research Center at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), AAAS Fellow on Data and Innovation Dr. Meredith Lee from the US Department of Homeland Security, and Product Manager in Crisis Response and Civic Innovation Nigel Snoad from Google who gave a compelling update on their Crisis Mapping projects which have millions of live hits per minute. Nigel’s presentation was powerful and reminds all of us, hands down, that we need open standard data with every technology platform.

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Following Google was Technology Integration Officer Al Gembara at the US Agency for International Development (USAID) talking about his deployment to the Philippines and then CEO and Founder Yo Yoshida from Appallicious who pulled information from FEMA’s Ready.gov site during disasters for information on what to do.

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National Coordinator for Health Information Technology Dr. Karen DeSalvo from the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and Senior Director Maryfran Tyler from NPR Labs who had a great piece of hardware using preexisting technology for populations with disabilities in alerting using a tablet and a box device that works over radio…yes I said radio. If you haven’t seen it, you should. I think this one might be a must have for all EMs to participate in rolling out to their communities.

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IMHO, I didn’t like presentation given by Chief Information Officer Bryson Koehler from The Weather Channel because it gave the perception that private industry was taking over notification for public safety agencies. Ahem, to be clear, this is the job of the National Weather Service (NWS).

Following was presentations from External Affairs Specialist Kristin Hogan Schildwachter from the San Francisco Department of Emergency Management, and Developer Evangelist Robert Lackey from Twilio.

Closing out the day, we heard from the Under Secretary for Science and Technology Dr. Reginald Brothers from DHS and the Deputy Homeland Security Advisor Rand Beers of the White House National Security Council.

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After these short presentations in the afternoon, we got a chance to talk to each of these companies and see their tech first hand. Overall, I have several favorites from today, but I believe that we as Emergency Management should continue to push for open data sharing and cross-platform compatibility.

Trust me, I get the private sector stuff…all about profit margins and of course making wads of money. After quick meetings with FEMA Administration including Administrator Fugate’s staff, we should continue to share for free what is right for all victims of disaster.

As far as I know, I was the only representative from Ohio to attend and I am truly honored to be invited to the White House to represent these great initiatives.

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Without question, I am excited to be a part of this technology that will no doubt one day save lives before, during, and after a disaster.

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@rusnivek

 

Soooo, I’ll be in Washington DC next week…

A quick update on next week’s trip to Washington DC aka my official invite to the White House…
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I have been invited by The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), and The National Security Council (NSC) to attend the White House Innovation for Disaster Response and Recovery Initiative on Tuesday July 29, 2014. Workshops in the morning and the event in the afternoon (Social Media, User-Centered Designs, and Predictive Analytics).
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Additionally, I’ll be taking in a few other meetings with response and preparedness agencies including DoD, DHS, and FEMA. Alphabet soup gang huh?
Am I nervous? Yep. I’m just hoping I don’t throw up on important people.
I’m totes excited.
Suit up!

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Event: White House Innovation for Disaster Response and Recovery Initiative on Tuesday July 29, 2014
This event will bring together technologists, entrepreneurs, and members of the disaster response community to showcase tools that will make a tangible impact in the lives of survivors of large-scale emergencies. The White House Innovation for Disaster Response and Recovery Initiative was first launched by the Administration in the wake of Hurricane Sandy to find the most effective ways technology can empower survivors, first responders, and local, state, tribal, territorial, and Federal government with critical information and resources.
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