Sharks in the HOV lanes? Cmon! #SharkWeek #2018

And for the second disaster trick, this picture….

IT AIN’T REAL!!!

Don’t be a dingbat, stop sharing this fake picture during disasters and/or flooding.

Aaaaaand yes, an easy twofer here too: TURN AROUND, DON’T DROWN!!!

Be a good steward of social media information.

@rusnivek

Hi Unique you dropped your phone #PIO #SocialMedia

Law enforcement has been in some tough situations. Most recently, social media has been credited with engaging the public.

In fact, some agencies have used social media to engage suspects who may leave items behind on a scene of a crime. Oooooo, evidence!

But this is not one of those cases.

On 07-04-18, this image was initially shared on Facebook then across various social media platforms.

The image with caption inferring that local law enforcement agency was pursuing the suspect and that the suspect dropped his/her cell phone while eluding law enforcement. Then, in order to reach out to the suspect and friends of the suspect, local law enforcement uses the suspect’s social media account to reach out and taunt.

While funny for public safety, we as trusting public safety pros need to take time to dispel rumors and verify facts. PIOs should be at the front line of this issue.

And yes, this post was actually fake. What the whut?

Here’s Chicago Police PIO Anthony Guglielmi’s response to this post gone viral.

Sooooooo, to recap:

  • The initial Facebook post was not associated to incident.
  • Image was borrowed from unrelated event.
  • LEOs were not involved in pursuit of suspect.
  • Law enforcement agencies are usually professional.
  • PIO was on it and addressed concern once information was vetted w/ 7th District.
  • Squashed viral post with real information. #truth

Well done CPD PIO!

Again, as PIOs we are the shepherds of our agency when it comes to reporting the facts and dispelling the rumors.

We as PIOs must remain vigilant and dispel rumors as soon as they appear. This is your job. The agency’s reputation is on the line so ensure the longevity and be cognizant of your agency’s image 24/7.

@rusnivek

#Hurricane #Harvey #Barricades? Turn Around Don’t Drown #FEMA #TADD #TXWx

As ongoing operations continue for survivors of Hurricane Harvey – key messages need to be repeated as Hurricane impact turns into catastrophic inland flooding.

Do not drive through flooded areas. Turn Around, Don’t Drown.

I encourage all Public Information Officers / Public Affairs Officers (PIOs/PAOs) to continue to share/amplify FEMA messaging like this to all their audiences.

#TurnAroundDontDrown

@rusnivek

 

 

Graphic: Turn Around, Don’t Drown. This graphic is part of the Flood Safety collection.

 

 

Did you participate in National Child Passenger Safety Week? #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

It is the start of the fourth week of 2014 National Preparedness Month

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

For me, it’s Sunday in PA!

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Practice for an emergency

#21: Did you get your child secured in your vehicle? National Child Passenger Safety Week – Thanks @UHRainbowBabies #Prepared2014 #NatlPrep

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September 13th through September 20th = National Child Passenger Safety Week. Various agencies are promoting in-vehicle safety for children across the country. In the United States, motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death among children. Data show that:

Risk Reduction for Every Age

Buckling children in age- and size-appropriate car seats, booster seats, and seat belts reduces the risk of serious and fatal injuries:

  • Car seat use reduces the risk for death to infants (aged <1 year) by 71%; and to toddlers (aged 1–4 years) by 54% in passenger vehicles.
  • Booster seat use reduces the risk for serious injury by 45% for children aged 4–8 years when compared with seat belt use alone.
  • For older children and adults, seat belt use reduces the risk for death and serious injury by approximately half. 

Scope of the Problem 

  • In the United States during 2011, more than 650 children ages 12 years and younger died as occupants in motor vehicle crashes,5 and more than 148,000 were injured.
  • One CDC study found that, in one year, more than 618,000 children ages 0-12 rode in vehicles without the use of a child safety seat or booster seat or a seat belt at least some of the time.
  • Of the children who died in a crash in 2011, 33% were not buckled up.

Risk Factors for Children and Teens

  • Of the children who died in a crash:
    • More black (45%) and Hispanic (46%) children were not buckled up compared with white (26%) children (2009-2010).
    • More of the older children (45% of 8-12 year olds) were not buckled up compared with younger children (one-third of 1-7 year olds; one-fourth of infants under 1) in 2011.
  • From 2001 to 2010, approximately 1 in 5 child passenger (<15 years old) deaths in the U.S. involved drunk driving; 65% of the time, it was the child’s own driver that had been drinking (BAC ≥ 0.08 g/dl).
  • Most child passengers (<15 years old) of drunk drivers (61%) were not buckled up in the fatal crash.
  • Restraint use among young children often depends upon the driver’s seat belt use. Almost 40% of children riding with unbelted drivers were themselves unrestrained.
  • Child restraint systems are often used incorrectly. One study found that 72% of nearly 3,500 observed car and booster seats were misused in a way that could be expected to increase a child’s risk of injury during a crash.

Preventing Motor Vehicle Injuries in Children

  • Based on strong evidence of effectiveness, the Community Preventive Services Task Force recommends car seat laws and car seat distribution plus education programs to increase restraint use and decrease injuries and deaths to child passengers.
  • Car seat distribution plus education programs are also recommended in a more recent review for increasing restraint use.
  • A recent study of five states that increased the age requirement to 7 or 8 years for car seat/booster seat use found that the rate of children using car seats and booster seats increased nearly three times and the rate of children who sustained fatal or incapacitating injuries decreased by 17%.

Read the recent Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR announcements) or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention feature story, and CDC’s Vital Signs on child passenger safety to learn more about buckling the ones you love in age- and size-appropriate car seats, booster seats, or seat belts.

 

And you bet I got my munchkin secured in the seat!

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Safety first for kids!

Special thanks to UH Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital for helping put my car seat in for FREE!

Right Arden?

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Oh munchkin!

@rusnivek

Statewide tornado siren test today at 0950. Find out what to do here #OHWX

It’s 2014 National Severe Weather Awareness Week from March 2nd through March 8th.

Today, the state of Ohio will be testing all emergency alert sirens at 9:50 a.m.

***Do not be alarmed, it is only a test.***

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It would also be a good time to practice your emergency procedures if a tornado siren/warning goes off.

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Do you know the differences between a Tornado Watch vs a Tornado Warning?

Tornado Watch: Issued by the NWS when conditions are favorable for the development of tornadoes. Be prepared to move to a safe place if weather conditions worsen. Stay tuned to weather updates.

Tornado Warning: Issued by the NWS when a tornado is imminent or occurring. A warning may be issued when a tornado is indicated by Doppler radar or sighted by trained spotters. Seek safe shelter immediately.

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  • If a tornado has been spotted, seek shelter immediately. If a tornado warning is issued for your area, do not stop to take pictures or shoot video. Continue to listen to a NOAA Weather Radio or local media newscasts for up-to-date weather and emergency information.
  • NEVER touch downed power lines or objects in contact with downed power lines and report electrical hazards to the utility company.
  • Check for injuries. Do not attempt to move seriously injured people unless they are in immediate danger of further injury.
  • Be careful of debris such as damaged structures, exposed nails and broken glass.

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Stay safe out there peeps!

@rusnivek

Do not break the law while driving in severe weather #OHWX

It’s 2014 National Severe Weather Awareness Week from March 2nd through March 8th.

Driving during severe weather? It doesn’t matter whether day or night – Do you have your headlights on?

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Ohio Revised Code 4513.03   Time for lighted lights on motor vehicles.

(A) Every vehicle, other than a motorized bicycle, operated upon a street or highway within this state shall display lighted lights and illuminating devices as required by sections  4513.04 to 4513.37 of the Revised Code during all of the following times:

(1) The time from sunset to sunrise;

(2) At any other time when, due to insufficient natural light or unfavorable atmospheric conditions, persons, vehicles, and substantial objects on the highway are not discernible at a distance of one thousand feet ahead;

(3) At any time when the windshield wipers of the vehicle are in use because of precipitation on the windshield.

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Remember, during severe weather, drive slowly peeps!

@rusnivek