To my fellow Americans….Happy 4th of July! #2018

To my fellow Americans….Happy 4th of July!!!

Cleveland, Ohio - 4th of July!

Cleveland, Ohio – 4th of July!

Here’s a few easy preparedness tips from the team at FEMA.

  • Leave the fireworks to the pros.
  • Keep children & pets at least 3 ft from grills & campfires.
  • Drink plenty of water – even if you don’t feel thirsty.
  • Check in on friends, family, & neighbors who don’t air conditioning.

And for those who are stuck inside/have to work, here’s a few fun option for you.

Maybe NYC is better?

No? How about Chicago?

Well, whatever you do, just keep it real safe everyone.

Happiest birthday to the greatest country in the world. #USA

America the beautiful.

@rusnivek

 

Children’s book on Hurricane Watch

Since it’s quiet in the office today, I’ve been assessing a few new kid preparedness and teaching tools.


Do you think Melissa has one on “Hurricane Warning” too?

Teach your kids about being safe and heeding all warnings from your local National Weather Service (NWS) office, Emergency Management officials, and public safety professionals.

@rusnivek

Did you participate in National Child Passenger Safety Week? #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

It is the start of the fourth week of 2014 National Preparedness Month

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

For me, it’s Sunday in PA!

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Practice for an emergency

#21: Did you get your child secured in your vehicle? National Child Passenger Safety Week – Thanks @UHRainbowBabies #Prepared2014 #NatlPrep

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September 13th through September 20th = National Child Passenger Safety Week. Various agencies are promoting in-vehicle safety for children across the country. In the United States, motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death among children. Data show that:

Risk Reduction for Every Age

Buckling children in age- and size-appropriate car seats, booster seats, and seat belts reduces the risk of serious and fatal injuries:

  • Car seat use reduces the risk for death to infants (aged <1 year) by 71%; and to toddlers (aged 1–4 years) by 54% in passenger vehicles.
  • Booster seat use reduces the risk for serious injury by 45% for children aged 4–8 years when compared with seat belt use alone.
  • For older children and adults, seat belt use reduces the risk for death and serious injury by approximately half. 

Scope of the Problem 

  • In the United States during 2011, more than 650 children ages 12 years and younger died as occupants in motor vehicle crashes,5 and more than 148,000 were injured.
  • One CDC study found that, in one year, more than 618,000 children ages 0-12 rode in vehicles without the use of a child safety seat or booster seat or a seat belt at least some of the time.
  • Of the children who died in a crash in 2011, 33% were not buckled up.

Risk Factors for Children and Teens

  • Of the children who died in a crash:
    • More black (45%) and Hispanic (46%) children were not buckled up compared with white (26%) children (2009-2010).
    • More of the older children (45% of 8-12 year olds) were not buckled up compared with younger children (one-third of 1-7 year olds; one-fourth of infants under 1) in 2011.
  • From 2001 to 2010, approximately 1 in 5 child passenger (<15 years old) deaths in the U.S. involved drunk driving; 65% of the time, it was the child’s own driver that had been drinking (BAC ≥ 0.08 g/dl).
  • Most child passengers (<15 years old) of drunk drivers (61%) were not buckled up in the fatal crash.
  • Restraint use among young children often depends upon the driver’s seat belt use. Almost 40% of children riding with unbelted drivers were themselves unrestrained.
  • Child restraint systems are often used incorrectly. One study found that 72% of nearly 3,500 observed car and booster seats were misused in a way that could be expected to increase a child’s risk of injury during a crash.

Preventing Motor Vehicle Injuries in Children

  • Based on strong evidence of effectiveness, the Community Preventive Services Task Force recommends car seat laws and car seat distribution plus education programs to increase restraint use and decrease injuries and deaths to child passengers.
  • Car seat distribution plus education programs are also recommended in a more recent review for increasing restraint use.
  • A recent study of five states that increased the age requirement to 7 or 8 years for car seat/booster seat use found that the rate of children using car seats and booster seats increased nearly three times and the rate of children who sustained fatal or incapacitating injuries decreased by 17%.

Read the recent Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR announcements) or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention feature story, and CDC’s Vital Signs on child passenger safety to learn more about buckling the ones you love in age- and size-appropriate car seats, booster seats, or seat belts.

 

And you bet I got my munchkin secured in the seat!

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Safety first for kids!

Special thanks to UH Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital for helping put my car seat in for FREE!

Right Arden?

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Oh munchkin!

@rusnivek

Free safety tips for all your Halloween shenanigans …I mean fun #trickortreat

Halloween is here in NE Ohio, and safety is still the most important part of the Halloween operation.

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To aid in your shenanigans I mean Halloween activities, here are some tips for you and your family to use during trick-or-treat fun:

  • Check your local newspaper, municipality’s website, or social media feed to get updates on times for trick-or-treating.
  • Make sure you have several working flashlight and so that everyone traveling in your party can be seen.
  • Only visit houses with porch lights that are turned on.
  • Be vigilant while crossing the street – look both ways before you cross and ALWAYS company children.
  • Stay in groups and keep an eye out for each other while trick-or-treating.
  • Hopefully your costumes are bright and reflective. If not, consider affixing reflective stickers or buttons to your costume to make you more visible to motorists.
  • Your costumes accessories should be made from soft pliable materials.
  • Do not eat any candy until you return home to your parents.
  • All parents should inspect and review all candy collected before allowing children to consume.
  • Discard any candy that show signs of tampering and throw away any candy that is not sealed or in the original packaging.
  • After you eat a ton of candy, don’t forget to brush your teeth.

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If you are driving this Halloween season, DRIVE SLOWLY! Never text while driving – it is a distraction and likely illegal in many cities. Children will be out and about – so keep a sharp eye for everyone on the street.

Hope you have a fun Halloween this year.

@rusnivek

Free tips and reminders for dealing with snow today

Hello snow!

NE Ohio had its first dose of snow last night. Started at about midnight, various reports have 2-8 inches on the ground.

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At this time, the National Weather Service Cleveland Office has issued a lake effect snow advisory in effect until 1300 EST (aka 1:00pm EST). Snow will be heavy with high water content. This can cause damage to trees and power lines.

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There are some dangers associated with wintry weather. Here are a few free tips to keep in mind while dealing with snow.

  • Walk carefully on snowy, icy walkways.
  • Avoid overexertion when shoveling snow. Overexertion can bring on heart attack – a major cause of death in the winter. If you must shovel snow, stretch before going outside.
  • Keep dry. Change wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. Wet clothes loses all of its insulating value and transmits heat rapidly.
  • Heavy snow will bring down trees and power lines. NEVER touch any downed power lines…even if you think they are safe, they are usually not. Keep everyone far away from downed lines.
  • Heavy snow will make trees sag and collapse. Be careful with trees are old or frail, they tend to collapse under the weight of the snow and have killed unknowing children.
  • Watch for signs of frostbite. These include loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities such as fingers, toes, ear lobes, and the tip of the nose. If symptoms are detected, get medical help immediately.
  • Watch for signs of hypothermia. These include uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness, and apparent exhaustion. If symptoms of hypothermia are detected, get the victim to a warm location, remove wet clothing, warm the center of the body first and give warm, non-alcoholic beverages if the victim is conscious. Get medical help as soon as possible.
  • And of course, don’t eat yellow snow.

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Use these tips to keep you and your family safe this fall….er….snowy season.

@rusnivek

Free Tips because October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month #WOPR

October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month!

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Here’s a few tips that could help you to enhance your Cyber protection:

  • Don’t click on strange or funky links.
  • Make sure your antivirus software is regularly updated.

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  • Only click on links that are from trusted sources.
  • Download the latest updates/patches for your computer programs.
  • Monitor and review your child’s online activity.

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  • Backup all your files regularly.
  • DO NOT click or play weird computer games like Global Thermonuclear War

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  • And please DO NOT talk to computers named Joshua.

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“How about a nice game of chess?”

@rusnivek