Run? Hide? Fight? Here’s a few better ones

Tuesday morning hit hard after a long holiday weekend. On the ride in, I was thinking more about the new terminology that will be rolled out shortly to replace the “Run! Hide! Fight!” – for active shooter situations.

At last week’s National Preparedness Symposium, one of the FEMA Consortium partners brought up the newly revamped procedures.

1. Lock or block it.

2. Become invisible.

3. Silence your phone.

4. Silence yourself.

5. When you come out, ask “Is it OK?”

Lots of discussion on review of actions too. While heroic in practice/training, we are seeing that people are more reserve when it comes to actual emergencies.

Same as before, contemplate a counter-attack strategy with others who are stuck with you. “I go high and you go low” type conversations will help coordinate your immediate response if a threat presents itself.

Having good communications skills as well as non-verbal communications skills are critical esp in a dangerous situation.

Get to know your co-workers and your neighbors.

@rusnivek

State of Ohio EMA G291 Joint Information Center / System class at Medina County EOC

Packed State of Ohio EMA Joint Information Center / Joint Information System course today!

Started everyone into group work as well as ongoing discussion on the role of SMEs at a press conference.

Just in case, we also tasked participants to start thinking about a policy/protocol for their agency on sneak attack aka ambush interviews.

We found as we leverages our strengths and capitalize on our skills, we as JIC Managers can better meet the needs of any situation – we just gotta find the right PIOs for the job.

As our groups collaborated, we found that despite crossing state lines, we still have the same problems as other areas – thus proving our point that we need to consistently train together and exercise our plans together.

Many of our participants enjoyed working in the JIC setting and were excited to work in a JIC during the next activation. Most excellent as we build a strong cadre of PIOs across this great state.

My Ohio Peeps!

Reporting live from Medina County’s Emergency Operations Center….

@rusnivek

“Never underestimate the power of your water can.” – Lt. Chris Goldsworth

I was cleaning out a few older files from my cabinet and I came across an old gem from (now retired) Lt. Chris Goldsworth and his love for his water can.

This short video from Bellerose Terrace in New York exemplifies the effectiveness of a water can.

Aside from the 1 3/4, think about the lonely water can which sits poised to do some work.

“Never underestimate the power of your water can.” – Lt. Chris Goldsworth

Stay safe!

@rusnivek

 

Terrorism has no place in a civilized world

Thoughts and prayers to everyone who involved with the egregious attacks in Paris today. Terrorism has no place in a civilized world.

Photo credit: AP Photo/Thibault Camus

Photo credit: AP Photo/Thibault Camus

Back here in the US, good reminder for everyone: “If you see something, say something” – Department of Homeland Security (DHS)

@rusnivek

Zombies? Godzilla? But not a lobster assault! #Preparedness

I thought I was worried about zombie attacks or a Godzilla invasion. I didn’t plan for a lobster assault…

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Clearly, I haven’t taken the Independent Study online class for Lobster Assault Response and Recovery…yet.

@rusnivek

Free tips and reminders for dealing with snow today

Hello snow!

NE Ohio had its first dose of snow last night. Started at about midnight, various reports have 2-8 inches on the ground.

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At this time, the National Weather Service Cleveland Office has issued a lake effect snow advisory in effect until 1300 EST (aka 1:00pm EST). Snow will be heavy with high water content. This can cause damage to trees and power lines.

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There are some dangers associated with wintry weather. Here are a few free tips to keep in mind while dealing with snow.

  • Walk carefully on snowy, icy walkways.
  • Avoid overexertion when shoveling snow. Overexertion can bring on heart attack – a major cause of death in the winter. If you must shovel snow, stretch before going outside.
  • Keep dry. Change wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. Wet clothes loses all of its insulating value and transmits heat rapidly.
  • Heavy snow will bring down trees and power lines. NEVER touch any downed power lines…even if you think they are safe, they are usually not. Keep everyone far away from downed lines.
  • Heavy snow will make trees sag and collapse. Be careful with trees are old or frail, they tend to collapse under the weight of the snow and have killed unknowing children.
  • Watch for signs of frostbite. These include loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities such as fingers, toes, ear lobes, and the tip of the nose. If symptoms are detected, get medical help immediately.
  • Watch for signs of hypothermia. These include uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness, and apparent exhaustion. If symptoms of hypothermia are detected, get the victim to a warm location, remove wet clothing, warm the center of the body first and give warm, non-alcoholic beverages if the victim is conscious. Get medical help as soon as possible.
  • And of course, don’t eat yellow snow.

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Use these tips to keep you and your family safe this fall….er….snowy season.

@rusnivek