FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS with ANSWERS BALLISTIC MISSILE PREPAREDNESS

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS with ANSWERS BALLISTIC MISSILE PREPAREDNESS

Revised: 08 AUG 2017.2

Q: Why now? Has the North Korea missile threat increased so much recently that you were urged to begin preparations for an attack?

A: Preparations for the North Korea missile and nuclear threat began in late 2016 when this assessment suggested early preparations should be initiated. Hawaii has maintained plans to cope with missile testing since 2009. The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency (HI-EMA) conducts a Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) every year. This process examines potential hazards and threats to the State of Hawaii including natural (hurricane, tsunami), technological (cyberterrorism) and man-made (acts of terrorism) hazards.

Q: I have heard that planning for a nuclear attack from North Korea is futile given most of the population will be killed or critically injured. Is that true?

A: No. Current estimates of human casualties based on the size (yield) of North Korean nuclear weapon technology strongly suggests an explosion less than 3 miles in diameter. More than 90% of the population would survive the direct effects of such an explosion. Planning and preparedness are essential to protect those survivors from delayed residual radiation (fallout) and other effects of the attack such as the loss of utilities and communication systems, structural fires, etc.

Q: How will the public learn of a possible missile launch from North Korea?

A: Approximately 5 minutes into the launch sequence, the U.S. Pacific Command will notify the Hawaii State Warning Point (SWP) that a missile is in route from North Korea. The SWP is staffed on a 24-hour, 7 day-a-week basis by skilled emergency management professionals. Upon receipt of the notification, the SWP will activate the ‘Attack-Warning’ signal on all outdoor sirens statewide (wailing sound) and transmit a warning advisory on radio, television and cellular telephones within 2 minutes.

Q: What should Hawaii residents and visitors do when they hear the ‘Attack-Warning’ siren signal?

A: All residents and visitors must immediately seek shelter in a building or other substantial structure. Once the sirens sound, residents and visitors will have less than 12 to 15 minutes before missile impact.

Q: Was the recent public messaging recommending that each individual/family maintain a 14-day survival kit made because of the North Korea threat?

A: No. The 14-day recommendation was made following an intensive analysis suggesting that Hawaii could experience a major disruption to maritime transportation (shipping and ports) in the event of a major hurricane. This recommendation does however complement the potential need for 14 days of sheltering following a nuclear attack.

Q: When will schools begin nuclear drills?

A: Schools are not expected to conduct drills specific to a nuclear attack. Existing drills known as ‘lock down’ drills serve the same purpose. These drills are regularly conducted at all schools statewide and are considered more than adequate in terms of protecting students and staff.

Q: When will the new ‘Attack-Warning’ siren signal will available and how will it be tested?

A: The new (second) ‘Attack-Warning’ siren signal (wailing sound) will be available for use beginning in November 2017. The signal will be tested on the first working day of every month thereafter together with the existing ‘Attention-Alert’ signal (steady sound) used for other emergencies.

Q: Are there public shelters (blast or fallout) designated in our communities?

A: No. There are currently no designated shelters in the State of Hawaii at this time. The short warning time (12 to 15 minutes) would not allow for residents or visitors to locate such a shelter in advance of missile impact.

Q: How long will residents and visitors need to remain sheltered following a nuclear detonation?

A: In most cases, only until the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency has assessed residual radiation and fallout. This could be as little as a few hours or as long as 14 days.

Q: What is fallout?

A: Debris including soil, fragments of destroyed buildings and other material will be drawn into the cloud of a nuclear detonation and propelled into the sky. This debris will begin to settle back to earth within hours. This debris includes residual radiation that poses a significant health risk to humans and animals.

Q: How can I tell if nuclear radiation is present?

A: Nuclear radiation cannot be perceived by the human senses (sight, smell, etc.). Specialized instruments are needed to detect its presence and intensity. Those instruments are available for use by public safety agencies across the State of Hawaii.

Q: How long will nuclear radiation persist after a nuclear detonation?

A: Radiation from nuclear detonation in the form of fallout decays very rapidly. Days to weeks in most situations.

Q: Are the neighbor island safe?

A: We do not know. North Korean missile technology may not be adequately advanced to accurately target a specific island or location. Although most analysts believe the desired target will be Oahu given the concentration of military and government facilities, a missile may stray and impact the open ocean or even a neighbor island. All areas of the State of Hawaii must consider the possibility of missile impact.

Q: How will the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency communicate with the public post-impact? I have heard that most broadcast stations and other forms of electronic communications (cellular telephones, radio, television) will be damaged or destroyed

A: When a nuclear weapon detonates, one of the direct effects produced is called an Electromagnetic Pulse (or EMP). EMP has the potential of destroying electrical devices and telecommunications systems. It may also disrupt electrical power and other essential utilities. Broadcast stations many miles distant from the explosion (such as on another island) will survive EMP effects. Our current plans are to utilize AM and FM broadcast radio stations on unaffected islands to provide essential information to the public. This means residents and visitors should include a battery-powered AM-FM radio in their 14-day survival kit.

Q: How can I learn more about the nuclear threat and preparedness?

A: Public outreach and online information is available to all Hawaii residents.

Hawaii Emergency Management Agency Email: HawaiiEma@hawaii.gov

Web: http://dod.hawaii.gov/hiema/

Telephone: 808 -733-4300

or contact your county emergency management agency.
Ready.Gov website: https://www.ready.gov/nuclear-blast

NTED official = PER-344: Social Media Tools and Techniques course #NDPTC

It isn’t official until it’s DHS/FEMA NTED official #NDPTC

This….THIS!!!!!


I’m so happy right now.

surhappydance
Big mahalos to all the pros who have helped me through this process. I am fortunate to have your support in the course I created.

Yes indeed, this one is a big check mark off my career list.

@rusnivek

My Dad started his Neighborhood Watch Program!

I’m proud of my Dad who setup his Neighborhood Watch Program.

IMG_3973

Dad has been planning this for months now and even posted signs to get everyone involved. Because inviting and talking with the entire neighborhood about safety related topics are the key points of the Neighborhood Watch program. Also, my Dad went big – he blocked off the entire cul-de-sac for his event!

IMG_3980

Honolulu Fire Station-30 (Engine-30 & Ladder-30) stopped by to share some safety tips and what to do during an emergency.

IMG_3975

Ladder-30 showcased their equipment for everyone to see.

IMG_3982

Talked about ventilation saws for trench cuts and vertical cuts for fires.

IMG_3989

Also talked about extrication tools and generators for car accidents and confined space rescue.

IMG_3987

All the kids in the neighborhood got a chance to try out the headsets used for communications in the apparatus.

IMG_3986

Honolulu Police stopped by too.

IMG_3984

Even a surprise flyby thanks to Honolulu Fire Air-1 Helicopter.

In the end, this kind of neighborhood program is truly the basis of a safer community.

IMG_3983

Education, particularly teaching kids during an emergency, how to call 9-1-1 is crucial to a safe community.

IMG_3979

My Dad volunteered to do this. Yep, not paid. Just doing his part to keep his neighborhood and community safe. LOVE IT!

There are many other volunteer programs showcased by DHS/FEMA’s awesome Ready.Gov campaign on safety. Just like my Dad, I volunteer too with my community’s Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) aka RH-CERT.

Whether you are a part of your own Neighborhood Watch Program, Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), Volunteers in Police Service (ViPS), Medical Reserve Corp (MRC), Fire Corps, Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOADs), etc…all of these civic based programs are so important to the fabric for the safety of our community across this great country.

So proud of my Dad!

@rusnivek

68th MAST and Mercy-29 #WBW #EMSWeek2016 #EMSStrong

WBW (aka Way Back Wednesday) – because my First ambo ride was in Mercy-29.

Mad props to Ken and Andy.

IMG_1783

Also, for aeromedical evacuation, shout out to the MAST pros from the 68th Medical Detachment in Hawaii.

Evac-001C

Note: When I first started, they were still flying Hueys.

No matter the location, all EMS Professionals work hard 24/7 – and serve proudly in any community that calls.

Thank your local EMS Professionals for a job well done!

What is EMS Week?

Since President Gerald Ford first recognized EMS Week in 1973, communities, hospitals, healthcare organizations, survivors and EMS agencies spend a week every year in May recognizing the lifesaving work of EMS professionals. AROUND THE COUNTRY, EMS Week is celebrated with a variety of events.

2016 EMS Week: Sunday May 15 through Saturday May 21

emsweek

What is EMS Strong?

The EMS Strong campaign seeks to celebrate, unify and inspire the men and women of our nation’s emergency medical services. Created by the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) in partnership with the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT), EMS Strong brings together associations, EMS services, sponsors and national media to honor the dedication of EMS practitioners nationwide.

@rusnivek

Hiya NASA! #OurJourney

Thanks to NASA and the Houston Space Center on the quick tour today.

IMG_6349

Houston, Texas

Shuttle stuff is cool!

IMG_6364

Not quite the “all glass cockpit” that we are used to seeing in 2016.

Also thanks to all the media that was there today and will be there tomorrow covering the grand opening of the new Independence Plaza.

IMG_6355

Nurturing science and technology will help explore new frontiers. #NASA #Independence #ourjourney

It really is the perfect backdrop for everyone.

IMG_6419

Great examples of how science and technology will help explore new frontiers.

Also, so glad to see Challenger crew is still honored in many parts of the campus, staff, and on the tours. On behalf of everyone from Hawaii, this means so much to all of us.

106994main_image_feature_256_ajhfull

The NASA family lost seven of its own on the morning of Jan. 28, 1986, when a booster engine failed, causing the Shuttle Challenger to break apart just 73 seconds after launch.

NASA has some neat stuff.

IMG_6386

What the deuce?

An actual DoD red phone – I’m nerding out! “Flush the bombers, get the subs in launch mode. We are at DEFCON 1.”

IMG_6372

Truly honored.

IMG_6374

“We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.” – JFK September 12, 1962

Thank you NASA!

@rusnivek