Run? Hide? Fight? Here’s a few better ones

Tuesday morning hit hard after a long holiday weekend. On the ride in, I was thinking more about the new terminology that will be rolled out shortly to replace the “Run! Hide! Fight!” – for active shooter situations.

At last week’s National Preparedness Symposium, one of the FEMA Consortium partners brought up the newly revamped procedures.

1. Lock or block it.

2. Become invisible.

3. Silence your phone.

4. Silence yourself.

5. When you come out, ask “Is it OK?”

Lots of discussion on review of actions too. While heroic in practice/training, we are seeing that people are more reserve when it comes to actual emergencies.

Same as before, contemplate a counter-attack strategy with others who are stuck with you. “I go high and you go low” type conversations will help coordinate your immediate response if a threat presents itself.

Having good communications skills as well as non-verbal communications skills are critical esp in a dangerous situation.

Get to know your co-workers and your neighbors.

@rusnivek

TwitterChat on volunteers during disasters today at 1300EST #Prep2Serve #NatlPrep #PrepareAthon

As part of 2016 National Preparedness Month – numerous preparedness peeps will be participating in today’s TwitterChat.

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Gather tips and specific messaging that could work for your community on preparedness. Talk about different groups who are active within their community before, during, and after a disaster.

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RH-CERT in action!

To keep the convo going, consider using the #Prep2Serve today.

See you at 1300EST!

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“Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.”

@rusnivek

During an emergency, amplify official information

We talk a ton about people who carelessly retweet, share, and re-purpose information. Whether mis-informed or attention seeking whores, it is likely that people need a bit more digital responsibility on line esp w/ social media.

Part of me thinks that min-informed people don’t believe in the power of social media.

Seasoned PIOs know the potential of social media.

However, check out the tweet from Mountain View Police Department’s Capt Chris Hsiung re: Dallas Police Department.


Well said Capt Hsiung.

I encourage many in my classes to be good stewards of information and not to skew truth as it can only delay the root cause from others. We will not be led astray or swayed by sensational tweets, posts, etc…We must rely on straight facts and truth.

@rusnivek

My Dad started his Neighborhood Watch Program!

I’m proud of my Dad who setup his Neighborhood Watch Program.

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Dad has been planning this for months now and even posted signs to get everyone involved. Because inviting and talking with the entire neighborhood about safety related topics are the key points of the Neighborhood Watch program. Also, my Dad went big – he blocked off the entire cul-de-sac for his event!

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Honolulu Fire Station-30 (Engine-30 & Ladder-30) stopped by to share some safety tips and what to do during an emergency.

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Ladder-30 showcased their equipment for everyone to see.

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Talked about ventilation saws for trench cuts and vertical cuts for fires.

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Also talked about extrication tools and generators for car accidents and confined space rescue.

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All the kids in the neighborhood got a chance to try out the headsets used for communications in the apparatus.

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Honolulu Police stopped by too.

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Even a surprise flyby thanks to Honolulu Fire Air-1 Helicopter.

In the end, this kind of neighborhood program is truly the basis of a safer community.

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Education, particularly teaching kids during an emergency, how to call 9-1-1 is crucial to a safe community.

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My Dad volunteered to do this. Yep, not paid. Just doing his part to keep his neighborhood and community safe. LOVE IT!

There are many other volunteer programs showcased by DHS/FEMA’s awesome Ready.Gov campaign on safety. Just like my Dad, I volunteer too with my community’s Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) aka RH-CERT.

Whether you are a part of your own Neighborhood Watch Program, Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), Volunteers in Police Service (ViPS), Medical Reserve Corp (MRC), Fire Corps, Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOADs), etc…all of these civic based programs are so important to the fabric for the safety of our community across this great country.

So proud of my Dad!

@rusnivek