FEMA launches Prepare with Pedro at the 2018 Youth Preparedness Council

FEMA Region V Administrator James Joseph was in Washington DC today for the Youth Preparedness Council at Red Cross HQ.

Great to see Ready.Gov partnering with everyone on today’s events.

Additionally, download the free Prepare with Pedro workbook for kids here.

@rusnivek

 

TwitterChat on volunteers during disasters today at 1300EST #Prep2Serve #NatlPrep #PrepareAthon

As part of 2016 National Preparedness Month – numerous preparedness peeps will be participating in today’s TwitterChat.

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Gather tips and specific messaging that could work for your community on preparedness. Talk about different groups who are active within their community before, during, and after a disaster.

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RH-CERT in action!

To keep the convo going, consider using the #Prep2Serve today.

See you at 1300EST!

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“Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.”

@rusnivek

PIO Tip: Frame your shot and reduce your onscene variables

I was finishing up my AARs and found a picture from the last night of the Republican National Convention (RNC).

Quick tip for you PIOs doing field reporting: Frame your shot.

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Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams doing an interview with Time Magazine. Obvious chalked roadway with profane statement behind him. Videographer is recording at an upward angle to frame his subject.

During the RNC, we found that it was critical to frame the shot. Onscene shots were particularly tough because so many activist groups had signs, chalked, or painted words that are inappropriate for pictures or even worse yet, uncontrolled live broadcast hits (Periscope or FacebookLive or YouTubeLive).

Additionally, live outdoor broadcasts from the scene are challenging because it is difficult to control the natural and man-made variables.

So as PIOs we need to reduce any signs, ropes, wires, etc….that could affect your framed shot.

 

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Trust me, reduce the amount of variables to a bare minimum.

Focus your energy in delivering your message. #PIO

@rusnivek

 

AAR / IP on the Toledo Water Contamination today

I’m facilitating the After-Action-Review / Improvement Plan for Fulton County from the Toledo Water Contamination.

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Lots of discussion from this all-hazards group of pros.

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Good Emergency Management discussions today!

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Most importantly, glad to see lots of engagement from everyone here.

@rusnivek

Tsunami warning? Are you on Kauai? #HITsunami

Tsunami warning? Are you on Kauai?

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Check if you are in an evacuation zone here (FREE):

Before a Tsunami

  • To begin preparing, you should build an emergency preparedness kit and make a family communications plan.
  • Talk to everyone in your household about what to do if a tsunami occurs. Create and practice an evacuation plan for your family. Familiarity may save your life. Be able to follow your escape route at night and during inclement weather. You should be able to reach your safe location on foot within 15 minutes. Practicing your plan makes the appropriate response more of a reaction, requiring less thinking during an actual emergency.
  • If the school evacuation plan requires you to pick your children up from school or from another location. Be aware telephone lines during a tsunami watch or warning may be overloaded and routes to and from schools may be jammed.
  • Knowing your community’s warning systems and disaster plans, including evacuation routes.
  • Know the height of your street above sea level and the distance of your street from the coast or other high-risk waters. Evacuation orders may be based on these numbers.
  • If you are a tourist, familiarize yourself with local tsunami evacuation protocols. You may be able to safely evacuate to the third floor and higher in reinforced concrete hotel structures.
  • If an earthquake occurs and you are in a coastal area, turn on your radio to learn if there is a tsunami warning.

 

During a Tsunami

  • Follow the evacuation order issued by authorities and evacuate immediately. Take your animals with you.
  • Move inland to higher ground immediately. Pick areas 100 feet (30 meters) above sea level or go as far as 2 miles (3 kilometers) inland, away from the coastline. If you cannot get this high or far, go as high or far as you can. Every foot inland or upward may make a difference.
  • Stay away from the beach. Never go down to the beach to watch a tsunami come in. If you can see the wave you are too close to escape it. CAUTION – If there is noticeable recession in water away from the shoreline this is nature’s tsunami warning and it should be heeded. You should move away immediately.
  • Save yourself – not your possessions.
  • Remember to help your neighbors who may require special assistance – infants, elderly people, and individuals with access or functional needs.

 

After a Tsunami

  • Return home only after local officials tell you it is safe. A tsunami is a series of waves that may continue for hours. Do not assume that after one wave the danger is over. The next wave may be larger than the first one.
  • Go to a designated public shelter if you have been told to evacuate or you feel it is unsafe to remain in your home. Text SHELTER + your ZIP code to 43362 (4FEMA) to find the nearest shelter in your area (example: shelter 12345).
  • Avoid disaster areas. Your presence might interfere with emergency response operations and put you at further risk from the residual effects of floods.
  • Stay away from debris in the water; it may pose a safety hazard to people or pets.
  • Check yourself for injuries and get first aid as needed before helping injured or trapped persons.
  • If someone needs to be rescued, call professionals with the right equipment to help. Many people have been killed or injured trying to rescue others.
  • Help people who require special assistance—infants, elderly people, those without transportation, people with access and functional needs and large families who may need additional help in an emergency situation.
  • Continue using a NOAA Weather Radio or tuning to a Coast Guard station or a local radio or television station for the latest updates.
  • Stay out of any building that has water around it. Tsunami water can cause floors to crack or walls to collapse.
  • Use caution when re-entering buildings or homes. Tsunami-driven floodwater may have damaged buildings where you least expect it. Carefully watch every step you take.
  • To avoid injury, wear protective clothing and be cautious when cleaning up.

 

For more information, check out www.ready.gov

@rusnivek