Let’s talk about Mitigation!

Another piece of the recovery effort is to breech the subject of mitigation.

We had several teams throughout the state placed in strategic locations – talking about mitigation strategies for various natural disasters.


Many of our teams handed out free flyers and pamphlets discussed ways to better mitigate dangers and potential issues at their residence or business.

Additionally, we also hosted several mitigation seminars across the state. Usually packed, we had lots of questions from disaster survivors


The one pictured above was in the second floor of the community’s fire station.

These types of community events are made so that residents have the ability to engage with Federal partners and ask questions, dispel rumors, and give a better understanding to processes.

And yes, no matter how early, mitigation and preparedness are such a critical part of phases of emergency management.

@rusnivek

PIO Tip: Frame your shot and reduce your onscene variables

I was finishing up my AARs and found a picture from the last night of the Republican National Convention (RNC).

Quick tip for you PIOs doing field reporting: Frame your shot.

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Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams doing an interview with Time Magazine. Obvious chalked roadway with profane statement behind him. Videographer is recording at an upward angle to frame his subject.

During the RNC, we found that it was critical to frame the shot. Onscene shots were particularly tough because so many activist groups had signs, chalked, or painted words that are inappropriate for pictures or even worse yet, uncontrolled live broadcast hits (Periscope or FacebookLive or YouTubeLive).

Additionally, live outdoor broadcasts from the scene are challenging because it is difficult to control the natural and man-made variables.

So as PIOs we need to reduce any signs, ropes, wires, etc….that could affect your framed shot.

 

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Trust me, reduce the amount of variables to a bare minimum.

Focus your energy in delivering your message. #PIO

@rusnivek

 

State of Ohio EMA new Joint Information Center class in #SummitCounty #JIC #JIS #PIO #ESF15

Rolling out the State of Ohio Emergency Management Agency‘s new G0291: Joint Information Centers (JIC) / Joint Information System (JIS) Planning for Tribal, state, and Local PIOs. Luckily, we were in the Command and Control room at the Summit County Health Department.

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Command Control room…aka DOC

As always, its great teaching with Sister Michael Marie. Outstanding experiences and great stories from her international work in challenging areas of the world.

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Even OEMA was checking in on our progress!

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#truelove for us Emergency Management Instructors.

Sister Michael showcased the importance of all-hazard PIO involvement in emergency response to a natural hazard.

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Everyone was able to share experiences and help each other improve – esp thinking outside the box on various scenarios.

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By the end of this in-class activity, our participants realized that there are so many parts to a “simple disaster” that it pays to build partnerships early.

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It’s all hands working in an emergency – so build your relationships early before a disaster.

Remember: At 0300, you ugly, you smell, you stink – and clearly that’s not the best time to meet new people and to function in an emergency at 110%.

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“As Emergency Management, we must continue to nurture solid working relationships and common response/recovery objectives with our all-hazards partners in public safety.” – @rusnivek

Best part? At the end of the class, they all applauded.

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Awwww yeah!

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When was the last time a class applauded your Emergency Management NIMS ICS compliant class?

Heh.

As always, it’s great to teach with OEMA Instructor and consummate professional Sister Michael Marie.

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There is so much going on in this picture. I can’t even.

I’m just glad to be a part of something big.

@rusnivek

Is this flooded roadway safe? You tell me…. #TADD #Prepared2014

This week is National Flood Safety Awareness Week (March 16 – 22, 2014).

To help clarify some misconceptions about water and flooding, let me make it very clear – NEVER drive through flooded roads. Here’s a great example. We were dispatched after a few reported calls of a flooded roadway. Looks innocent enough right?

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Just because it’s downhill does NOT mean it is any safer…in fact, it is more dangerous.

  1. Gravity will move/flow the water faster.
  2. More water will cause you to lose control of your vehicle or possibly sink your vehicle and/or drown you.
  3. More water will remain at the bottom of the hill will definitely cause damage to your vehicle.

So how can you share this safety message with others?

  • Continue to share the message of Turn Around, Don’t Drown = #TADD (National safety campaign phrase)
  • Flash flooding can occur anywhere – even within metropolitan and urban areas.
  • Avoid areas that are frequently flooded.
  • Always follow instructions from your local emergency service professionals.
  • Report any flooded roadways to the proper authorities.
  • NEVER drive through flooded roads.

It’s really bad news if we have to meet like this…

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If you were wondering, that’s me on the right

Do your part in #Prepared2014 by being safe this year.

@rusnivek

2014 National Flood Safety Awareness Week #TADD #Prepared2014

This week is National Flood Safety Awareness Week (March 16 – 22, 2014).

Did you know that floods are the #1 natural disaster in the US? Just within the past five years, all 50 states have experienced floods or flash floods.

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How can you help?

Share these easy safety tips with your constituents on flood safety:

  • Turn Around, Don’t Drown = #TADD (National safety campaign phrase)
  • Flash flooding can occur anywhere. If there is a possibility of a flash flood, move to higher ground. Always follow instructions from your local emergency service professionals.
  • NEVER drive through flooded roads.
  • Use local alerts and warning systems (like iPAWS and WEAs) which can send localized information about your immediate area.
  • Stay away from damaged areas unless your assistance has been specifically requested by police, fire, or relief organization.
  • Just a few inches of water from a flood can cause thousands of dollars in damages.
  • Do you know if you live in a flood zone? Find out here for free.

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So check your emergency preparedness kits and make sure you are ready!

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@rusnivek

Today at 10:17am, you should practice these 3 easy steps… #ShakeOut

After the most recent events that just occurred in the Philippines on Tuesday, I highly recommend that you participate in today’s Earthquake ShakeOut exercise.

“This isn’t California…Ohio doesn’t have earthquakes…”

WRONG McFly! The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) have recorded six earthquakes so far this year: three earthquakes in March and three earthquakes in July. Ohio had a total of four earthquakes in 2012.

Surprised? I know you are.

So on Thursday October 17, 2013 at 10:17am – practice your earthquake safety procedures with 9 other states in our region using these three easy steps:

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1. DROPto the ground 

2. Take COVERunder a sturdy table or desk, if possible, and protect your head and neck

3. HOLD ONuntil the shaking stops

Following these 3 easy steps will help protect and you during an earthquake.

ShakeOut is coordinated by the Central U.S. Earthquake Consortium and the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma and Tennessee.

See, even the cool kids are doing it.

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Stay safe!

@rusnivek