Fun stuff on the final day of ICS-300!

Day-3 final day of ICS-300 starting out with another in class exercise!

It is imperative that we push all agencies to think outside of their normal comfort zone and look to alternate resources and like-minded professionals.

Not only other pros, but also standardizing the response so that everyone is on the same page, using the same terminology, same forms, and same plans and objectives.

Your agency’s mission is very important.

Your organizational goals are super important too.

But those SMART Objectives are SOOOO critical to everyone onscene as well as future operational periods.

And yes, the same truths still apply: coffee and collaboration are totes critical when a disaster first strikes.

But it also takes a consummate professional to continue the work after the response phase…but into recovery and mitigation. Thus ensuring your community some protection as we are always in a state of preparedness.

Our class also had lots of discussion on this slide as we view credentialing as a preparedness activity as we look to standardization and qualifications.

Great week and proud of the work from all participants in this class.

Looking forward to seeing all of you on the next big one.

@rusnivek

Day-2 of ICS-300 w/ our DoD assets and public safety professionals

Day-2 of ICS-300 started off with some class discussion on other classes that newer Emergency Management Professionals could attend to help broaden the expertise.

As we roll into module-4, we have lots of in class exercises to help participants understand the importance of coordination in response.

Proud to see so many here from various disciplines as well as a few familiar faces in the crowd too.

And again, if you look closely, you can see participants smiling…IN MY ICS-300 CLASS!!!!!

Lotsa smiles!!!!

Again, great to see solid collaboration here in class. Sooooooo many great ideas exchanged in the room. Even more proud to see it done BEFORE an emergency or disaster.

Also, one day, someone will recognize my hand puppet skills.

Kidding.

Day-2 dunzo. Great participation from everyone in the class!

@rusnivek

Day-1 ICS-300 with strong DoD participation

It’s Monday morning so lets kick off another hard core ICS-300 course…in the Poinsettia Room! 🌺

Also known as the city’s Emergency Operations Center too.

Diverse groups today with a strong showing from our Department of Defense and local public safety professionals.

This kind of joint training provides us the opportunities to build stronger partnerships and even strengthen the preexisting bonds with DoD assets including a few special teams.

Lots of group work as participants figure out priorities and challenges during the first few hours and into the first/second operational period.

But working through the issues in a calm classroom will help reduce the amount of stress during an actual emergency. Finding out strengths and gaps and addressing them so that everyone can respond better to any incident. That’s right enhancing response capabilities.

Sound familiar? That’s what HSPD-5 (Homeland Security Presidential Directive-5) is all about. A coordinated response! <heavy breathing>

That is exactly what Emergency Management is all about – build relationships for a coordinated response. <heavier breathing>

And also proof, if you teach it right, you can get people to smile in my ICS classes.

Awww yeah!

Great work from all participants – lotsa participation from everyone!

Glad to see so much collaboration from local, county, state, Federal, and DoD assets.

And as always, thank you for your service to our great country.

Happy birthday Marty. It’s a great first day.

Looking forward to the next two days!

@rusnivek

Final day of Ohio EMA’s Emergency Planning Course

Second and final day of our Ohio EMA Emergency Planning course!

We are going to dive deep into CPG-101 and talk about how we can increase our ability to write better EOP base plans and enhance our annexes.

All four groups firing all the way as they work through challenges in formulation of SMEs for plans.

Dynamic chatter esp focusing in on American Red Cross and Emergency Management when it comes to bringing people to the table.

Dove deep into how CPG101 applies, incorporating the NRF, lots on NIMS compliance, and of course ICS requirements. Discussion also lead to a few case studies including Hurricane Jacob Cat-5 to Cat-2 hit.

Also fortunate to have key players from CERT, HAM, EM, and law enforcement at the table discussing challenges with paid vs volunteer staffing and accounting for resources.

I want to give a major shoutout to Alicen and Tim for their hospitality this week for the Ohio EMA G-235 course. Most gracious and hospitable course coordinators.

Now go forth and formulate good EOPs!

@rusnivek

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS with ANSWERS BALLISTIC MISSILE PREPAREDNESS

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS with ANSWERS BALLISTIC MISSILE PREPAREDNESS

Revised: 08 AUG 2017.2

Q: Why now? Has the North Korea missile threat increased so much recently that you were urged to begin preparations for an attack?

A: Preparations for the North Korea missile and nuclear threat began in late 2016 when this assessment suggested early preparations should be initiated. Hawaii has maintained plans to cope with missile testing since 2009. The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency (HI-EMA) conducts a Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) every year. This process examines potential hazards and threats to the State of Hawaii including natural (hurricane, tsunami), technological (cyberterrorism) and man-made (acts of terrorism) hazards.

Q: I have heard that planning for a nuclear attack from North Korea is futile given most of the population will be killed or critically injured. Is that true?

A: No. Current estimates of human casualties based on the size (yield) of North Korean nuclear weapon technology strongly suggests an explosion less than 3 miles in diameter. More than 90% of the population would survive the direct effects of such an explosion. Planning and preparedness are essential to protect those survivors from delayed residual radiation (fallout) and other effects of the attack such as the loss of utilities and communication systems, structural fires, etc.

Q: How will the public learn of a possible missile launch from North Korea?

A: Approximately 5 minutes into the launch sequence, the U.S. Pacific Command will notify the Hawaii State Warning Point (SWP) that a missile is in route from North Korea. The SWP is staffed on a 24-hour, 7 day-a-week basis by skilled emergency management professionals. Upon receipt of the notification, the SWP will activate the ‘Attack-Warning’ signal on all outdoor sirens statewide (wailing sound) and transmit a warning advisory on radio, television and cellular telephones within 2 minutes.

Q: What should Hawaii residents and visitors do when they hear the ‘Attack-Warning’ siren signal?

A: All residents and visitors must immediately seek shelter in a building or other substantial structure. Once the sirens sound, residents and visitors will have less than 12 to 15 minutes before missile impact.

Q: Was the recent public messaging recommending that each individual/family maintain a 14-day survival kit made because of the North Korea threat?

A: No. The 14-day recommendation was made following an intensive analysis suggesting that Hawaii could experience a major disruption to maritime transportation (shipping and ports) in the event of a major hurricane. This recommendation does however complement the potential need for 14 days of sheltering following a nuclear attack.

Q: When will schools begin nuclear drills?

A: Schools are not expected to conduct drills specific to a nuclear attack. Existing drills known as ‘lock down’ drills serve the same purpose. These drills are regularly conducted at all schools statewide and are considered more than adequate in terms of protecting students and staff.

Q: When will the new ‘Attack-Warning’ siren signal will available and how will it be tested?

A: The new (second) ‘Attack-Warning’ siren signal (wailing sound) will be available for use beginning in November 2017. The signal will be tested on the first working day of every month thereafter together with the existing ‘Attention-Alert’ signal (steady sound) used for other emergencies.

Q: Are there public shelters (blast or fallout) designated in our communities?

A: No. There are currently no designated shelters in the State of Hawaii at this time. The short warning time (12 to 15 minutes) would not allow for residents or visitors to locate such a shelter in advance of missile impact.

Q: How long will residents and visitors need to remain sheltered following a nuclear detonation?

A: In most cases, only until the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency has assessed residual radiation and fallout. This could be as little as a few hours or as long as 14 days.

Q: What is fallout?

A: Debris including soil, fragments of destroyed buildings and other material will be drawn into the cloud of a nuclear detonation and propelled into the sky. This debris will begin to settle back to earth within hours. This debris includes residual radiation that poses a significant health risk to humans and animals.

Q: How can I tell if nuclear radiation is present?

A: Nuclear radiation cannot be perceived by the human senses (sight, smell, etc.). Specialized instruments are needed to detect its presence and intensity. Those instruments are available for use by public safety agencies across the State of Hawaii.

Q: How long will nuclear radiation persist after a nuclear detonation?

A: Radiation from nuclear detonation in the form of fallout decays very rapidly. Days to weeks in most situations.

Q: Are the neighbor island safe?

A: We do not know. North Korean missile technology may not be adequately advanced to accurately target a specific island or location. Although most analysts believe the desired target will be Oahu given the concentration of military and government facilities, a missile may stray and impact the open ocean or even a neighbor island. All areas of the State of Hawaii must consider the possibility of missile impact.

Q: How will the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency communicate with the public post-impact? I have heard that most broadcast stations and other forms of electronic communications (cellular telephones, radio, television) will be damaged or destroyed

A: When a nuclear weapon detonates, one of the direct effects produced is called an Electromagnetic Pulse (or EMP). EMP has the potential of destroying electrical devices and telecommunications systems. It may also disrupt electrical power and other essential utilities. Broadcast stations many miles distant from the explosion (such as on another island) will survive EMP effects. Our current plans are to utilize AM and FM broadcast radio stations on unaffected islands to provide essential information to the public. This means residents and visitors should include a battery-powered AM-FM radio in their 14-day survival kit.

Q: How can I learn more about the nuclear threat and preparedness?

A: Public outreach and online information is available to all Hawaii residents.

Hawaii Emergency Management Agency Email: HawaiiEma@hawaii.gov

Web: http://dod.hawaii.gov/hiema/

Telephone: 808 -733-4300

or contact your county emergency management agency.
Ready.Gov website: https://www.ready.gov/nuclear-blast

The smell of fresh EOC in the morning…for a brand new Social Media course in Colorado  

“I love the smell of fresh EOC in the morning…”


Let’s get our social media on!


Say #Aloha to the brand new FEMA / NDPTC Social Media Engagement Strategies class!


Reporting live from the State of Colorado Emergency Operations Center…

@rusnivek

February is almost all Region-5 and a roll out of a brand new social media course in Colorado

January was fast paced but February 2017 is going to be lots more hustle too!

In the first week, its another great Basic Public Information Officer’s course and Joint Information Center course at Wayne Township Fire. Love me some Region-5 baby!

Second week, I’ll be leading the Incident Management Team Logistics Section Chief Course in Dayton – the home of Ohio Urban Search and Rescue Task Force-1 (OH-TF-01). Teaching FEMA EMI courses are super fun. Week long Logistics is AWESOME!

Third week, we will be back in Athens, Ohio bringing our Basic Public Information Officer’s course (G-290) and Joint Information Center course (G-291) with one of my favorite instructors Erica aka Mama PIO in Region-5 again!

Fourth week, I head back to Centennial to debut a brand new course for FEMA/NDPTC on social media. Looking forward to seeing my Colorado peeps again at the state Emergency Operations Center. Region 8 in the hizzouse!

fema_regional_map

Busy February! Hope to see you my classes!

@rusnivek