Trust your staff to tell your agency’s story

Trust your staff and let them tell your agency’s story. Through their eyes, voice, and heart – the world will truly see the mission and goal.

Juan is a perfect example: Soon to be Father, an excellent DRC Manager, and most importantly, his family is from Puerto Rico. A testament to professionalism, dedication, caring, and compassion to countless survivors of Hurricane Irma here in the Florida Keys.

Me? I’m just proud to be on his team.

@rusnivek

I do not FAVORITE on Twitter – but I LIKE #SMEM

Stop saying favorite….say like!

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In case you missed it, Twitter changed their “favorite” button to a “like” button.

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Yep, it changed from a star to a heart.

Twitter has played off the move from “favorite” to “like” as a universal symbol. The hearts have also done well on Periscope, Twitter’s live broadcast social media app. Perhaps it’s their cross platform comfort by using the heart as their like too.

Although I am NOT much of a fan of the new change, it might make it easier for people to say the one-syllable “LIKE” vs that three-syllable “FAVORITE” – I guess.

#Twittr

#Twittr

In my life, I do appreciate Twitter saving me from saying two less syllables.

Either way, you should “LIKE” things on Twitter now.

@rusnivek

 

Your pet needs an emergency preparedness kit too! Check out the one I have – ready to go #Prepared2014 #NatlPrep #Woof

It’s finally Friday in this third week of 2014 National Preparedness Month

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

#FridayFurDay right? Or is that #FridayFunday ?

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Build an Emergency Kit

#19: Your pet needs an emergency preparedness kit too! Check out the one I have – ready to go #Prepared2014 #NatlPrep #Woof

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Dry dog food (3 days worth). I have Kacy’s food parceled out into individual easy servings. This way, we don’t over feed her.

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Two (2) bottles of water – which is enough for her for 3 days.

Pet identification (3×5 notecard in zip lock bag which makes this waterproof) which includes our contact cell phones and twitter handles, pet name, date of birth, current vaccinations, county dog registration, vet address, vet phone, and of course a short description of what she looks like. Also in the zip lock bag is Kacy’s pet medications (heart worm pills and flea and tick meds).

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Small bowl to eat and drink.

Dog identification tags that includes her name tag, county dog identification, rabies vaccination information, our contact information, and home address.

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Pet First Aid kit – I got this from a community fair thanks to the local health department. This is a necessity! It will make minor injuries easier to manage.

Extra static 6ft leash…and yes, it’s labeled w/ duct tape with her name on it.

Packable raincoat because in case it rains, we are prepared for adverse weather! Also the “wet dog smell” isn’t the most fragrant aroma.

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Favorite pet toys for Kacy which includes two Nylabone chew toys and a bright orange rubber tennis ball from Target.

*******All of the above items fit nicely in a dog carry pack. *******

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Incidentally, this pack/harness has a handle on the topin case I need to emergently pick her up and go. I also have a green glow stick (break activation) that attaches via carabiner to the top for easy identification during night travel/evacuation.

The pack has several zippered outside pockets so I can separate the medications/Identification from the food.

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These simple and easy basic supplies make up my pet preparedness kit. Keep in mind that everyone’s pet preparedness kits should be different depending on the size and breed of the animal…but it should have the basics like food, water, and medications.

I was reminiscing about my deployment during Hurricane Katrina/Rita in 2005 – our Task Force saw SO many abandoned pets in Louisiana’s Lower 9th Ward.

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In case of an emergency or disaster, PLEASE take the time to prepare/evacuate with your pets as they are part of your family.

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For more information on how you can put together your pet preparedness kit, check out this free FEMA Ready.Gov link on pet preparedness.

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For those wondering, Kacy is a rescue dog. Best. Dog. Ever.

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Special thanks to my dog Kacy for helping out in today’s preparedness post. #woof

@rusnivek

A list of religious agencies involved in post disaster support #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

Ahhh, the smell of Saturday…in the last day of the second week in 2014 National Preparedness Month.

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

Finishing strong in week-2!

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Know How To plan for specific needs before a Disaster.

#13: Plan with religious agencies to support recovery efforts after a disaster. Keep an updated list at the ready. #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

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Now, I’m not much of a church guy…however you don’t need to be religious to realize these services exist. It would be well worth your time to learn what groups are active and which ones could support your recovery efforts after a big disaster.

So keep a current list with names and phone numbers of groups who are active in disaster recovery. As an example:

And if you don’t use them, maybe your neighbors could utilize their services.

All planning should force you to think outside-the-box when addressing unmet needs. All of these groups are a vital part of our All-Hazards response in rebuilding every community post-disaster.

@rusnivek

 

 

Free tips and reminders for dealing with snow today

Hello snow!

NE Ohio had its first dose of snow last night. Started at about midnight, various reports have 2-8 inches on the ground.

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At this time, the National Weather Service Cleveland Office has issued a lake effect snow advisory in effect until 1300 EST (aka 1:00pm EST). Snow will be heavy with high water content. This can cause damage to trees and power lines.

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There are some dangers associated with wintry weather. Here are a few free tips to keep in mind while dealing with snow.

  • Walk carefully on snowy, icy walkways.
  • Avoid overexertion when shoveling snow. Overexertion can bring on heart attack – a major cause of death in the winter. If you must shovel snow, stretch before going outside.
  • Keep dry. Change wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. Wet clothes loses all of its insulating value and transmits heat rapidly.
  • Heavy snow will bring down trees and power lines. NEVER touch any downed power lines…even if you think they are safe, they are usually not. Keep everyone far away from downed lines.
  • Heavy snow will make trees sag and collapse. Be careful with trees are old or frail, they tend to collapse under the weight of the snow and have killed unknowing children.
  • Watch for signs of frostbite. These include loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities such as fingers, toes, ear lobes, and the tip of the nose. If symptoms are detected, get medical help immediately.
  • Watch for signs of hypothermia. These include uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness, and apparent exhaustion. If symptoms of hypothermia are detected, get the victim to a warm location, remove wet clothing, warm the center of the body first and give warm, non-alcoholic beverages if the victim is conscious. Get medical help as soon as possible.
  • And of course, don’t eat yellow snow.

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Use these tips to keep you and your family safe this fall….er….snowy season.

@rusnivek