Monday = Debris Management!

Starting out this week talking about Debris Management and the importance of Public Works and Logistics!

Yeah, doesn’t seem like a fun topic right? But if you look at the real deal, this is how Emergency Managers earn their keep. Cause it’s not in the response phase.

Emergency Managers work the magic in the recovery phase.

Collaboration in class means that we hash out a few issues prior to the actual disaster.

Working closely with all factions in government will ensure a smooth response from everyone involved.

The faster you get your community back on track, the better your community will be. Building resilient communities is critical!

You should address 10 major factors as part of your debris plan.

Is this difficult? Most definitely. Here’s a picture from the USVI in 2017.

Here’s a picture from the USVI in November 2018.

Can you think of any planning challenges? Any logistical issues? Any major environmental issues?

If you said a million yeseseses to the above three questions, you need to address your debris management plan with your Emergency Management official.

Special mahalos to my Co-instructor Ben.

Sharing a few stories about counter intelligence, we realize it’s a really small world.

@rusnviek

Debris management isn’t easy! #Hurricane #Irma 

Aside from all the response stuff that goes on in the disaster, I think the mainstream public doesn’t understand debris management. In fact, I would go so far as to say that many communities across the US don’t have a debris management plan.

Here’s the current situation here in Monroe County, FL (aka Florida Keys).


This is one of several locations for debris.


What makes this so complex is that because of the smaller geographic location of the islands, it is hard to manage space too.


Emergency Managers should also think about transportation of debris. I’ve had to already roll out my evasive driving maneuvers. Not good.


I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Response is easy. But true Emergency Managers know that Recovery is the hardest phase in a disaster.

@rusnivek

Help your Dad before a disaster strikes #NatlPrep 

When making a plan for your family, do include planning for your Dad. That’s right, Dads could be in danger!

Sturdy boots are a must-have for any emergency preparedness kit. Or else this could be your Dad. #NatlPrep 


In an emergency, make sure your Dad is safe.


Plan ahead and stay safe!

@rusnivek

Statewide tornado siren test today at 0950. Find out what to do here #OHWX

It’s 2014 National Severe Weather Awareness Week from March 2nd through March 8th.

Today, the state of Ohio will be testing all emergency alert sirens at 9:50 a.m.

***Do not be alarmed, it is only a test.***

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It would also be a good time to practice your emergency procedures if a tornado siren/warning goes off.

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Do you know the differences between a Tornado Watch vs a Tornado Warning?

Tornado Watch: Issued by the NWS when conditions are favorable for the development of tornadoes. Be prepared to move to a safe place if weather conditions worsen. Stay tuned to weather updates.

Tornado Warning: Issued by the NWS when a tornado is imminent or occurring. A warning may be issued when a tornado is indicated by Doppler radar or sighted by trained spotters. Seek safe shelter immediately.

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  • If a tornado has been spotted, seek shelter immediately. If a tornado warning is issued for your area, do not stop to take pictures or shoot video. Continue to listen to a NOAA Weather Radio or local media newscasts for up-to-date weather and emergency information.
  • NEVER touch downed power lines or objects in contact with downed power lines and report electrical hazards to the utility company.
  • Check for injuries. Do not attempt to move seriously injured people unless they are in immediate danger of further injury.
  • Be careful of debris such as damaged structures, exposed nails and broken glass.

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Stay safe out there peeps!

@rusnivek

Free safety tips for today’s severe weather inbound #OHWX

Got some bad weather heading to North East Ohio today.

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Here’s a few free tips you can use to prepare for today severe weather:

  • Remove dead or rotting trees and branches that could fall and cause injury or damage during a severe thunderstorm.
  • Consider postponing outdoor activities.
  • Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage.
  • Break out your emergency preparedness kit and see if all flashlights are working. If not, get them in working order.
  • Charge all of your mobile devices including your cell phone now before the power goes out.

To get up to the minute updates during the Thunderstorm:

  • Use your battery operated NOAA Weather Radio for updates from the National Weather Service.
  • Cordless and wireless phones not connected to wall outlets are safe to use.

And after the storm passes, take these precautions as you survey the damage around your house:

  • Do NOT touch downed power lines. Assume all lines are charged and dangerous. Call your emergency services to handle safe removal of lines.
  • Wear log sleeved shirts and long pants with gloves and boots. Debris from storms are usually sharp and dangerous.
  • Power out? Check the power company’s website to see who else doesn’t have power here.
  • Never drive through a flooded roadway. Remember: Turn Around, Don’t Drown! #TADD

Feel free to share these tips with your neighbors too.

@rusnivek