Monday = Debris Management!

Starting out this week talking about Debris Management and the importance of Public Works and Logistics!

Yeah, doesn’t seem like a fun topic right? But if you look at the real deal, this is how Emergency Managers earn their keep. Cause it’s not in the response phase.

Emergency Managers work the magic in the recovery phase.

Collaboration in class means that we hash out a few issues prior to the actual disaster.

Working closely with all factions in government will ensure a smooth response from everyone involved.

The faster you get your community back on track, the better your community will be. Building resilient communities is critical!

You should address 10 major factors as part of your debris plan.

Is this difficult? Most definitely. Here’s a picture from the USVI in 2017.

Here’s a picture from the USVI in November 2018.

Can you think of any planning challenges? Any logistical issues? Any major environmental issues?

If you said a million yeseseses to the above three questions, you need to address your debris management plan with your Emergency Management official.

Special mahalos to my Co-instructor Ben.

Sharing a few stories about counter intelligence, we realize it’s a really small world.

@rusnviek

Drone hampers aeromedical crew from landing at MVA

Flying a drone and causing trouble during an actual call?

See, I told you that it would happen. To verify, check my documentation from my AAR on 03-06-14 (AirOps Branch-Observation/Recommendation-3 on page 16).

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@rusnivek

 

 

Police: Ohio Man’s Drone Prevents Medical Helicopter from Landing at Crash Scene

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

SPRINGFIELD, Ohio (AP) — A man is facing charges after deputies say he was flying a video camera-equipped drone that hindered the landing of a medical helicopter at an accident scene.

Kele Stanley, of Springfield, said he’s been unfairly charged and would have landed it immediately if he knew the medical helicopter was en route.

“I’m not an idiot,” he said.

The hobbyist was flying the $4,000 drone over a crash scene on Saturday morning to shoot photos and video.

Authorities said both fire officials and a Clark County sheriff’s deputy told Stanley to stop flying his remote-controlled aircraft because the helicopter was preparing to land, and that he refused. The helicopter was able to land and depart safely from the scene.

Stanley is facing a felony charge of obstructing official business and misdemeanor charges of misconduct at an emergency and disorderly conduct. He pleaded not guilty during a court appearance Monday and said he’s going to hire a lawyer to fight the charges.

Stanley, a 31-year-old copy-machine repairman and videographer, said he flew his remote-controlled “hexacopter” about 75 feet above where a pickup had hit a tree in Moorefield Township near Springfield. He said he was shooting the video as a hobby and would have turned it over to local television stations, as he has done before.

There currently are no regulations in Ohio governing private use of the unmanned aircraft, although law enforcement agencies must get special permits to use them. The Federal Aviation Administration bars the commercial use of drones.

Free Wireless Emergency Alerts from @FEMA #OHWX #Prepareness2014

It’s 2014 National Severe Weather Awareness Week from March 2nd through March 8th.

Today, we will focus in on wireless mobile notification alerts!

Have you heard of Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEAs)?

  • Alerts received at the right time can help keep you safe during an emergency. With WEA, warnings can be sent to your mobile device when you may be in harm’s way, without need to download an app or subscribe to a service.
  • You can receive important lifesaving alerts no matter where you are – at home, at school, or at work. Numerous public safety officials use reliable systems to alert you and your family in the event of natural or man-made disasters. Many communities also offer emergency alert notifications through their own systems.

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Do you know what the Emergency Alert System (EAS) is used for?

  • The Emergency Alert System (EAS) is a national public warning system that requires broadcasters, satellite digital audio service and direct broadcast satellite providers, cable television systems, and wireless cable systems to provide the President with a communications capability to address the American people within 10 minutes during a national emergency.

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Meshing all technologies together, do you know how the Integrated Public Alert & Warning System (IPAWS) is already helping everyone?

  • The Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS), is a modernization and integration of the nation’s existing and future alert and warning systems, technologies, and infrastructure.
  • IPAWS’ EAS is the message dissemination pathway that sends warnings via broadcast, cable, satellite, and wireline services. EAS may be used by state and local authorities, in cooperation with the broadcast community, to deliver important emergency information, such as weather information, AMBER alerts, and local incident information targeted to specific areas.
  • The Emergency Alert System (EAS) is a national public warning system that requires broadcasters, satellite digital audio service and direct broadcast satellite providers, cable television systems, and wireless cable systems to provide the President with a communications capability to address the American people within 10 minutes during a national emergency.300by250_Spanish_5

At this time in Ohio, the Integrated Public Alert & Warning System (IPAWS) authorities who have completed the authentication steps are:

1. Ashtabula County

2. Clark County

3. Delaware County

4. Fairfield County

5. Geauga County

6. Lucas County

7. Ohio Emergency Management Agency

8. Tuscarawas County

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Hope you are paired with one of these local agencies to receive better information during severe weather or major emergency…otherwise, you’ll be left out in the dark.

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@rusnivek