PIO-ing Cleveland’s Public Square during #PrideInTheCLE #ClevelandPride

Yesterday, I supported Cleveland Police on the #PrideInTheCLE #ClevelandPride event in Public Square.

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Much different from the Republican National Convention.

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Lots of families out and about (and enjoying) the new cool fountain in downtown Cleveland.

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Everyone was having a great time.

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Lots of speculation and talk about public safety not being around to support the LGBT community – all totally false. Public Safety will be there to support any community.

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Trust me, lots of public safety was on hand to support our entire community.

Cleveland Police Bomb Squad and K9 teams…

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Cleveland EMS…

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..even the Cleveland Police bike patrol was out supporting the day’s events.

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Lots of areas to cover.

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Partnerships with the Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Department and Cleveland Police Department are key in providing safety for everyone who attended the event.

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It was a relatively hot day so I am glad that many of the participants dressed appropriately for the event.

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Some not so much.

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Fun entertainment and friendly people staying cool out in Public Square.

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While waiting around, we had some time for a quick PIO selfie…

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Also had time for a few interviews with local media.

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Also happy to run into a long time good friend Mark Zinni who is the anchor for the Channel 3 Eyewitness News in Hartford, Connecticut. Great to see him again.

Thanks for the picture Zinni!

Thanks for the picture Zinni!

Can’t wait to see him again in Cleveland.

While out there, we even made a few new peeps into Junior Police Officers.

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Thanks Ken!

We were fortunate enough to do a few live interviews on Periscope from Public Square.

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We highlighted the event and gave a status report of the operations using Periscope.

Ever wonder what it’s like to hang with onscene PIOs? Here’s a behind the scenes shot of us doing some live interviews on Periscope.

Thanks for the pic Zinni!

Thanks for the action shot Zinni!

Trust me, it’s harder than it looks.

Overall, it was great to see so many people out on a Saturday afternoon in Cleveland.

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As always, I had a great time working the PIO magic with Jen!

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Hope everyone stayed dry while the rain hit.

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Great safe event everyone!

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Have a great weekend!

@rusnivek

 

Teaching the brand new DHS/FEMA Basic Public Information Officer Course

Awwww yeah! This past week, I got a chance to teach part of the brand new DHS/FEMA G0290: Basic Public Information Officer Course!

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Formerly known as G-290 course, this is the new FEMA Basic Public Information Officer course taught across the country for all public safety and emergency management professionals.

Thanks again to the Kentucky Emergency Management Agency and KESC for allowing me the opportunity. Also, special thanks to the ever fashionable Mike from NIOA.

Frominos

Shakas because we are reporting live from Kentucky…

@rusnivek

Technical jargon and giving actionable information Safety-PIO-SM-14-006

14-006: Technical jargon and giving actionable information
Agency: Chicago Fire Department Topic(s): Industry codes / Actionable info
Date: Fall 2014 Platform: Twitter

Industry speak or technical jargon is part of what we do every day. But using technical terms on a social media platform will be confusing to those who are NOT in the fire service. That’s what the Chicago Fire Department did yesterday at their big 3-alarm fire when they tweeted technical jargon.

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The use of technical jargon is rampant in emergency services but when speaking to the media or the general public, we need to remember that everyone did not grow up with a VOX alarm or SCU tones. In this case, a “311” or 3-11 alarm means that there are 11 engines, 5 Trucks, 2 Tower Ladders, 6 Battalion Chiefs, 1 Rescue Squad, 2 Ambulances, 2 Paramedic Chiefs, Deputy District Chief, Deputy Fire Commissioner, and the 1st Deputy Fire Commissioner are onscene. There is no way to include all that information in a tweet, but using more simple terms will help your audience understand the scale of your ongoing incident.

Before you post images, make sure your pictures are rotated correctly. I know accuracy is sometimes overlooked in lieu of speed, but it takes less than 5 seconds to orientate/rotate a picture (In this case, it was going to be a long operation). And note, by just rotating a picture does not equate that you are “doctoring up” photos. But a correctly posted photo will help media repost and format your information quicker to the masses.

During an emergency situation, your constituents need the information pushes to be actionable and specific to your audience. Not only inform them of the danger, but tell them what they can do about it.

A more effective tweet could have read:

Chicago Fire: Large 3-alarm fire at Harrison St x Fifth Ave. Traffic delays-avoid the area. (insert two pictures)

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You cite the authority having jurisdiction and established incident command presence.
  2. You generally described the size/category of the ongoing incident and critical information to media.
  3. You identify the exact location of the incident.
  4. You describe the delays in the area and give actionable information to your constituents.
  5. You still have lots of room to push properly orientated pictures with your informational tweet.

 

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

@rusnivek

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this file:

TechnicalJargonAndGivingActionableInformation-Safety-PIO-SM-14-006

@rusnivek’s Top-6 Public Safety / PIO social media tips…for free

I had a thought this AM..I need to provide you more public safety social media tips. And since you only have 30 seconds to spare, maybe less, I’ll keep it very short.

SO, here’s part-1 of my top 6 SM tips for public safety professionals / Public Information Officers (PIOs). And yes, it’s free for you.

@rusnivek Social Media Tip-1: Post it first (because they don’t interview the runner-up).

If you don’t post it first, someone else will be first to tell your story.

And that’s going to suck…because only you tell your story the best.

It only takes a few minutes to tell your story. 

It takes a TON of money and time to fix the wrong story, and then to tell it right.

To put things in perspective, “There are no points for second place.”

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Tip-1: Post it first (because they don’t interview the runner-up).

@rusnivek