What does HumpDay have to do with your kit?

As we are in the middle of the second week of 2020 National Preparedness month, we should continue to talk about your preparedness kits. While yesterday’s kit was part of my deployment loadout, there are similarities between personal preparedness kit and professional deployment kits.

How timely of a topic since today is HUMP DAY!

One such item that is replicated in all of my kits is cash.

That’s right, dolla holla yo!

And quite literally, it’s specifically dollar bills y’all. All dollar bills! Look, before you start asking about the singles that are ready to mingle, think about it like this:

During the first outsets of a disaster where infrastructure is non-existent, power is not working, and cell service is out…all your precious credit cards, debit cards, and touchless pay methods will not work. Period.

So tried and true, cash talks. I deploy out with at least $200 in cash to supplement our operations.

Additionally, businesses may not have the capability to provide change so dollar bills will allow you to provide close monetary values for most products.

My esteemed colleague MaryJo Flynn is right, $2 bills would be good because it reduces your weight by 50%…aka 6 ounces. But regardless (or irregardless-eek), small bills/denominations are critical when prepping your kit.

Most definitely, don’t carry two $100 bill and expect change.

Some parts of the country still prefer cash so take that into consideration as you plan on the safety of your family and being able to provide for them during the first 72 hours of a disaster.

Now would be an excellent time to go to the bank and get your singles.

More easy tips tomorrow on your prep kit.

Reporting live and making it rain…..

@rusnivek

Cold Water Challenge aka IceBucketChallenge

So I was called out on the Cold Water Challenge by
1. Amanda Ball, Outreach Coordinator at MedFlight of Ohio
2. Mark Ramach, Retired Brook Park Fire Chief
3. Firefighter/Paramedic Andy Morales, Cleveland ARFF
4. Ken Ledford, Bedford Heights Fire Chief

Since Amanda was the first one to call me out, I have given her the nod to dump an entire cooler full of ice water on me.

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Special thanks to Truck-2 on the assist.

So I’m calling out:
1. Erica Creech, Communications Manager of Cleveland Water
2. John O’Brien, Communications Specialist of Cuyahoga County Sheriffs
3. Gayle Celebreeze, Flight Nurse from University Hospitals MedEvac
4. Andrew Doyle, Firefighter Paramedic with Baltimore City Fire

You have 24-hours.
Starting now.

@rusnivek’s Top-6 Public Safety / PIO social media tips…for free

I had a thought this AM..I need to provide you more public safety social media tips. And since you only have 30 seconds to spare, maybe less, I’ll keep it very short.

SO, here’s part-1 of my top 6 SM tips for public safety professionals / Public Information Officers (PIOs). And yes, it’s free for you.

@rusnivek Social Media Tip-1: Post it first (because they don’t interview the runner-up).

If you don’t post it first, someone else will be first to tell your story.

And that’s going to suck…because only you tell your story the best.

It only takes a few minutes to tell your story. 

It takes a TON of money and time to fix the wrong story, and then to tell it right.

To put things in perspective, “There are no points for second place.”

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Tip-1: Post it first (because they don’t interview the runner-up).

@rusnivek