Twitter is now tracking all other apps too! Freaked out?

So…this just happened to me.

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Twitter will now track the activities from all your OTHER apps on your smart phone/tablet.

That’s right, Twitter will use:

  • your FourSquare/Swarm geolocation data to target you for ads.
  • your pictures to see what you take pictures of to target you for ads.
  • your songs to see what music you listen to so they can target you for ads
  • your Instagram photos to see who likes them so they can target ads to them.
  • your airlines apps so they can serve you targeted ads on your flights
  • your phone calls to see who/where you call so they can target ads to you/them.

You get the idea.

Yeowza Twitter.

From Twitter’s EULA: “…collecting and occasionally updating the list of apps installed on your mobile device so we can deliver tailored content that you might be interested in.”

Creeped out? You know you can disable this feature through the Twitter app’s settings menu. Depending on the iOS:

  • For iOS device users: disable this through setting —> account -> privacy -> Tailor Twitter based on my apps.
  • For Android users: settings -> account -> other ->Tailor Twitter based on my apps.

I get that Twitter would like to collect data with what I do using in the Twitter app. In fact, I expect it. However, I am a bit uncomfortable with Twitter collecting info from various other apps.

Not cool Twitter. Way to be that creepy Uncle.

@rusnivek

 

Your emergency USB drive #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

It’s the first Friday, the first week of 2014 National Preparedness Month!

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

Easy right? My goal is to provide actionable information so that you can better prepare you and your family.

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Reconnect with Family After a Disaster.

#5: Use a small USB drive includes all key emergency documents & family communications plan #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

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These ubiquitous USB drives (aka thumb drives, jump drives, memory sticks, etc…) are so easy to find. Best part? These things are cheap! You can easily find 16G for $2…which is WAY more storage that you’d ever need to store your documents in an emergency.

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What to keep stored on this jump drive? Scanned or digital copies of your:

  • Family Communication Plan (that also includes an out-of-state contact)
  • Driver’s License/State Identification card
  • Passport
  • Social security card
  • Birth Certificates
  • Home Insurance card
  • Auto Insurance card
  • Credit card(s)
  • Copies of a recent bank statements
  • High resolution pictures of your family and individual pictures.

As you pack your one ounce USB drive, don’t forget to put it in an airtight freezer ziplock type bag. Your electronic equipment does not like getting wet.

The cost of these USB drives are so low, that it behooves you to use easy technology now to better leverage your position in a disaster. Because you won’t have time to copy/transfer these documents during a rapid evacuation, now is the time to be prepared.

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Keeping good documentation for your family is one of the most important parts of reconnecting with family during and after a disaster.

@rusnivek

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A lonely shortened Facebook link on Twitter – Safety-PIO-SM-14-004

14-004: A lonely shortened Facebook link on Twitter
Agency: South Central Sierra Interagency IMT Topic(s):         Shared information/update
Date: Summer 2014 Platform:        Twitter

 

Speed is primarily the reason why everyone loves social media…especially Twitter. Many agencies use social media to provide updates and information when assigned to certain incidents. That’s what the South Central Sierra Interagency Incident Management Team did during the French Fire in California when they pushed this lonely shortened Facebook link out on Twitter.

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I get that 140 character max on Twitter is short…and you have lots to say…and you don’t have time…and blah blah blah. Everyone else doesn’t have time too. But pushing a non-descript link, does raise a concern that perhaps your account has been compromised by spam bots. Your agency has worked diligently to establish solid working relationships. During an emergency is the WORST time for your audience to question and/or ignore your official accounts with trusted reliable information.

 

If your social media plan calls for directing all efforts to Facebook as the primary source of information, a Public Information Officer (PIO) should still take the time to provide a little information (like a short description) on other platforms driving the traffic to that primary source. Providing just a link is not enough.

In the PIO business, we are forced to be precise, however just providing a link pertaining to a dangerous situation or disasters will not be enough to satiate the Twittersphere’s social interest.

 

Audiences change on various social media platforms, however, many agencies *think* they are all the same.

Knowing your audience is the hallmark of success. If you pair your Facebook and Twitter accounts to save time and to pass the exact same message – you should consider separating them now. Remember, you write/post/share information differently on various social media platforms.

 

A more effective tweet could have read:

Still assigned to the French Fire here in California-Check out pictures frm @BLMNational Interagency Fire fb.me/1BV35Tytx #CAWildfire

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You have more visibility by informing your followers that your team is still assigned to the incident.
  2. The link looks less spammy and readers know what the specific content is in the link.
  3. Your #hashtag will give more information about the current overall disaster/emergency.
  4. Your readers are likely to click on this hyperlink because it will take them to a picture. People love pictures.
  5. Your agency shows coordinated efforts with national response agencies when you use @mentions on twitter.

 

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

 

@rusnivek

 

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this: ALonelyShortenedFacebookLinkOnTwitter-Safety-PIO-SM-14-004a

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7.2 Earthquake in Philippines – here’s some free tips to stay safe after an earthquake #Cebu #Mindanao #Boljoon #Bohol

For those in and around the Philippines, take caution in all activities.

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Here are some tips that you can use as you recover from your large earthquake.

  • When the shaking stops, look around to make sure it is safe to move. Then exit the building.
  • Expect aftershocks. These secondary shockwaves are usually less violent than the main quake but can be strong enough to do additional damage to weakened structures and can occur in the first hours, days, weeks, or even months after the quake.
  • Help injured or trapped persons. Remember to help your neighbors who may require special assistance such as infants, the elderly and people with access and functional needs. Give first aid where appropriate. Do not move seriously injured persons unless they are in immediate danger of further injury. Call for help.
  • Look for and extinguish small fires. Fire is the most common hazard after an earthquake.
  • Listen to a battery-operated radio or television for the latest emergency information.
  • Be aware of possible tsunamis if you live in coastal areas. These are also known as seismic sea waves (mistakenly called “tidal waves”). When local authorities issue a tsunami warning, assume that a series of dangerous waves is on the way. Stay away from the beach.
  • Use the telephone only for emergency calls.
  • Go to a designated public shelter if your home had been damaged and is no longer safe.
  • Stay away from damaged areas. Stay away unless your assistance has been specifically requested by police, fire, or relief organizations. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.
  • Be careful when driving after an earthquake and anticipate traffic light outages.
  • After it is determined that its’ safe to return, your safety should be your primary priority as you begin clean up and recovery.
  • Open cabinets cautiously. Beware of objects that can fall off shelves.
  • Put on long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, sturdy shoes and work gloves to protect against injury from broken objects.
  • Clean up spilled medicines, bleaches, gasoline or other flammable liquids immediately. Leave the area if you smell gas or fumes from other chemicals.
  • Inspect the entire length of chimneys for damage. Unnoticed damage could lead to a fire.
  • Check for gas leaks. If you smell gas or hear blowing or hissing noise, open a window and quickly leave the building. Turn off the gas at the outside main valve if you can and call the gas company from a neighbor’s home. If you turn off the gas for any reason, it must be turned back on by a professional.
  • Look for electrical system damage. If you see sparks or broken or frayed wires, or if you smell hot insulation, turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker. If you have to step in water to get to the fuse box or circuit breaker, call an electrician first for advice.
  • Check for sewage and water lines damage. If you suspect sewage lines are damaged, avoid using the toilets and call a plumber. If water pipes are damaged, contact the water company and avoid using water from the tap. You can obtain safe water by melting ice cubes.

For more up to the minute information, consider following @philredcross for more details.

Stay safe everyone.

@rusnivek