Terrific to terrible weather in less than 24-hours

It’s still 2017 National Severe Weather Preparedness Week!

Despite the spectacular summer weather we are experiencing today in March, it is likely that conditions can rapidly change.

While we see this today…


…we might see this kind of weather in the next 24-hours.

​​​Of course we need to be prepared for these types of situations so I usually have a few of these emergency panchos stashed away in my vehicle.

While not fashionable, they provide some refuge and partial coverage in case I or my fellow PIOs get caught in some severe weather incident – we are somewhat protected.

And yes, having more than one is advisable as you likely have other family, friends, and/or people that might get wet too.

For more info on how you could better prepare yourself for severe weather, check out the list of preparedness stuff from my friend Jana and her team at Ready.Gov on a kit or an family communications plan.

Be safe and dry peeps!

@rusnivek

 

 

A lonely shortened Facebook link on Twitter – Safety-PIO-SM-14-004

14-004: A lonely shortened Facebook link on Twitter
Agency: South Central Sierra Interagency IMT Topic(s):         Shared information/update
Date: Summer 2014 Platform:        Twitter

 

Speed is primarily the reason why everyone loves social media…especially Twitter. Many agencies use social media to provide updates and information when assigned to certain incidents. That’s what the South Central Sierra Interagency Incident Management Team did during the French Fire in California when they pushed this lonely shortened Facebook link out on Twitter.

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I get that 140 character max on Twitter is short…and you have lots to say…and you don’t have time…and blah blah blah. Everyone else doesn’t have time too. But pushing a non-descript link, does raise a concern that perhaps your account has been compromised by spam bots. Your agency has worked diligently to establish solid working relationships. During an emergency is the WORST time for your audience to question and/or ignore your official accounts with trusted reliable information.

 

If your social media plan calls for directing all efforts to Facebook as the primary source of information, a Public Information Officer (PIO) should still take the time to provide a little information (like a short description) on other platforms driving the traffic to that primary source. Providing just a link is not enough.

In the PIO business, we are forced to be precise, however just providing a link pertaining to a dangerous situation or disasters will not be enough to satiate the Twittersphere’s social interest.

 

Audiences change on various social media platforms, however, many agencies *think* they are all the same.

Knowing your audience is the hallmark of success. If you pair your Facebook and Twitter accounts to save time and to pass the exact same message – you should consider separating them now. Remember, you write/post/share information differently on various social media platforms.

 

A more effective tweet could have read:

Still assigned to the French Fire here in California-Check out pictures frm @BLMNational Interagency Fire fb.me/1BV35Tytx #CAWildfire

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You have more visibility by informing your followers that your team is still assigned to the incident.
  2. The link looks less spammy and readers know what the specific content is in the link.
  3. Your #hashtag will give more information about the current overall disaster/emergency.
  4. Your readers are likely to click on this hyperlink because it will take them to a picture. People love pictures.
  5. Your agency shows coordinated efforts with national response agencies when you use @mentions on twitter.

 

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

 

@rusnivek

 

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this: ALonelyShortenedFacebookLinkOnTwitter-Safety-PIO-SM-14-004a

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Snow in the streets? Be careful or else this could happen to your kids #OHWX

It’s 2014 National Severe Weather Awareness Week from March 2nd through March 8th.

Do you have snow shovels and snow removal equipment in your emergency preparedness kit?

Do you have adequate clothing and blankets to keep warm?

How are the batteries in your NOAA Weather Radio so you can get immediate updates from the National Weather Service (NWS)?

During severe weather, minimize your travel. If travel is necessary, always keep a disaster supplies kit in your vehicle.

Bring pets/companion animals inside during winter weather. Move other animals or livestock to sheltered areas with non-frozen drinking water.

Snow day? Do not let kids play for long periods of time. Most everyone should stay away from the roads during severe weather. A great demonstration of why you should stay indoors by Fox29’s Steve Keeley.

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Thanks Steve….In other news…

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@rusnivek

Safety Tip: Downed power lines – 2014 National Severe Weather Awareness Week #OHWx

It’s 2014 National Severe Weather Awareness Week from March 2nd through March 8th.

Here’s some simple safety tips that you can share with your peeps to stay safe during the constantly changing weather.

Remember, NEVER touch downed power lines.

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Keep away from loose or dangling power lines and report them immediately to the power company.

Walk carefully around the outside your home and check for loose power lines, gas leaks and structural damage before entering.

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@rusnivek