Starting another ICS-400: Advanced ICS

Another solid start to a fun ICS-400: Advanced Incident Command System for Command and General Staff course.

Looking forward to expanding on the concepts in ICS-300 and enhancing it with some of my most recent disaster deployments Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Maria.

Reporting live from the classroom of fun…

@rusnivek

 

Day-1 of ICS-400 – who’s excited?!?

Who’s excited for some ICS-400 today?!?!?


Great start for today’s NIMS ICS-400 Advanced ICS Command & General Staff – Complex Incidents.


Michelle from Emergency Management welcoming everyone to the Training Center (aka backup EOC).


With almost every Emergency Support Function (ESF) represented, we were able to facilitate solid discussion on opening a second Operations Section or Logistics Section.


Collaboration with various partners in public safety, health departments, and National Guard will only help increase speed and efficiency for response/recovery efforts.


Building an Area Command chart(s) in the Unit-4 will help put things into perspective esp when situations has to deal with multiple locations and prioritization of resource allocation.


I know, poor Fryville.

However, various discussions just happens to align with large scale events like political rallies, national sports events, and National Special Security Event (NSSE).

Great first day. Looking forward to more discussion tomorrow too.

@rusnivek

Your image on social by monitoring your name Safety-PIO-SM-14-007

14-007: Your image on social by monitoring your name
Agency: Lakewood Fire Topic(s):         Monitoring your name/branding
Date: Fall 2014 Platform:        Twitter

Monitoring your namesake has been debated for years. But with decreased staffing and less time to do more with less, many agencies are bypassing this critical piece of community relations and image/branding. A good example is when a citizen commented on Lakewood Fire’s SUV parking.

IMG_1372

Everyone has a camera these days. We use them not only to capture memories and precious moments, but also for documentation and shaming. I believe Todd was going for the public safety shaming factor here. I am unsure on the previous relationship between Todd and Lakewood, but there was never a response on Twitter back to Todd. Truth be told, these days, unanswered public questions are sometimes perceived as a government agency cover-ups/issues. Similar to the “No comment” – a non-response might even be worse.

How do you monitor your agency’s name or any derivatives? Try these free services: Google Alerts, search columns in TweetDeck or Hootsuite, or frequent basic vanity searches on any search engine or social media platforms.

While Todd’s use of hashtags is fairly standard social media malarkey, a swift response with a timely and direct reply to Todd’s tweet would help stop the perception that LFD is breaking the law or even setting a bad example. Remember, social media is about digital interaction.

The response could also be a teaching point so share with your audience some insight into your normal operations with a simple message on Fire Prevention activities – like hydrant testing. And using the hashtag #FirePrevention pulls up thousands of tweets about educating the public specifically in fire safety.

An effective @reply response to Todd’s tweet could have read:

@stwrs1974 During an emergency, it’s tough to find safe parking. FYI-we also check/flush hydrants twice a year too #FirePrevention 

By phrasing it this way:

  1. You immediately address the issue directly with the citizen citing the issue.
  2. You provide insight into scene safety during an emergency.
  3. You call attention to your normal operations (in this case-hydrant flushing).
  4. You use the hashtag #FirePrevention to call attention to…well…Fire Prevention.
  5. You show the general public you care about your image and want to get the story right.

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

@rusnivek

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this file:

YourImageOnSocialByMonitoringYourName-Safety-PIO-SM-14-007

 

Yarnell Hill Incident Commander discusses investigative report #LODD

USA Today interviewed the Yarnell Hill Incident Commander (IC) discusses the investigative report after the 19 Line of Duty Deaths (LODDs) from Prescott Fire.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/10/04/commander-reflects-on-yarnell-fire-tragedy/2926419/

Opinion: I don’t think this report exonerates his command team.

My recommendations: Proper training for all responders will help better understand ever-changing and very dangerous conditions on the scene.

@rusnivek