Internal Comms training for my #EmergencyManagement staff

As we continue our training, we want to be cognizant of all kinds of skills needed to be successful in Emergency Management.

Many of you have been apart of a training or exercise…and have indubitably identified that communications is an action that needs more work. But how can you make that fun? Well, enter one of my Thunderbolt-esque exercises.

Giving the nod to former FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate, these types of no-notice trainings engage our staff and forces them to think outside the box.

How outside? In this exercise, we cover

  • Communications
  • Type/Kind resources
  • Staging
  • Incident Command
  • Terminology
  • Nomenclature
  • Scene size-ups
  • Operations
  • Sequential
  • Prioritization
  • Ordering
  • Tactics

And to boot, it’s non-traditional training cause there are no powerpoints. Zero. Zilch. No joy. Gonzo. Nada Ghostrider.

As adult educators, we often forget that people learn things differently. Additionally, we as instructors need to explore outside our comfort zone and teach things in a classic lecture AND non-traditional style.

I am incredibly fortunate to have a staff that loves to train and enhance their skills. Train like you fight!

Want to know more? Want to train better? Come and be a part of my Emergency Management Team. You’ll see.

@rusnivek

Aerial operations is critical in a Type-1 disaster #PIO

Large type-1 disasters are complex. Not only complexity but in pure size.

In the Florida Keys, destruction was not just limited to houses and commercial structures, but he Category-4 storm + storm surge + possible tornadic events affected so many ships and vessels.

Aerial operations are so important esp when gathering information on resource management and triaging. This picture is of one of the many ships in the bay that were inoperable and uninhabitable.


However, as response agencies go, we need to prioritize things and see what needs to be done first. Therefore pictures like this are critical to tactical and operational pros.


If you only had a roadside view, you would have only seen this small portion of this disaster.


Yes I said it, rotor wing WTF! Additionally, your favorite PIO can get a better grasp on the situation and report out to stakeholders of ongoing joint operations.


Again, your command element should consider an aerial element with HQ photography to aid in SA/COP.

@rusnivek

All-Hazards participants in today’s class in South Dakota

Here for the class today. Numerous all-hazards responders including US Department of Interior, Bureau of Land and Natural Resources (BLNR), US Forestry Service, FireAttack T-1/2 AHIMTs, local law enforcement, infrastructure, utilities, public safety comms, PIOs, healthcare, Tribal agencies, and Emergency Management professionals from South Dakota.


Nothing gets in the way of good training!


In breaking for lunch just now, participants asked if the fella over there with the hella good hair had any Taylor Swift.

Yes, I’m a very accommodating instructor – no problem!


Reporting live from the EOC…FEMA Region-8 baby!
@rusnivek

Correct typing starts early… #Tanker #Tender

No Tonka, according to the FEMA NIMS Typing, this is a Tender.

IMG_6263

Ahem.

**Truth be told, I’ve mistakenly done this over the statewide radio. #oops

@rusnivek

Yarnell Hill Incident Commander discusses investigative report #LODD

USA Today interviewed the Yarnell Hill Incident Commander (IC) discusses the investigative report after the 19 Line of Duty Deaths (LODDs) from Prescott Fire.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/10/04/commander-reflects-on-yarnell-fire-tragedy/2926419/

Opinion: I don’t think this report exonerates his command team.

My recommendations: Proper training for all responders will help better understand ever-changing and very dangerous conditions on the scene.

@rusnivek