A great resource in the community? City council? Start with your Safety Chairperson #NatlPrep

No matter where you are, big or small, your city council is a great place to start to learn more about your community.

Engage your community’s council members & safety committee chairperson.They can provide valuable insight to emergency plans #NatlPrep

@rusnivek and my city’s Safety Committee Chair

It is highly likely that they are active members of the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) too. Whoop whoop!

For more information, check out www.Ready.Gov‘s free info on CERT here.

@rusnivek

 

Spent my day with my hometown CERT

Spent my day volunteering with my hometown Community Emergency Response Team (CERT).

On arrival, I thought I was going to get assigned a different task, but logistics and parking was the identified main concern and safety was an issue.

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After I got briefed on the event, I discussed our situation with all the participants. As CERT, we coordinated our efforts so that our actions/tactics could best match the safety of our personnel as well as others who were there attending the event.

I briefed the Mayor on our ongoing operations and even looked at a few alternate plans.

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Of course we continued to assess our event and think about other safety measures.

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And of course we had a few moments to share a smile.

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Fun fact, our Council President and Safety Chair is also a proud founding member of my awesome CERT Team. Booya!

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Seriously, I love it when elected members of local government give back to their community.

We identified a few issues that will need to be made for the 2016 event (like a formal all-hazards traffic plan with maps, uniformed vests, pre-event plan dissemination/distribution, more participation, etc…). Maybe a formal Incident Action Plan (IAP). Fairly easy stuff that we would be happy to share w/ our constituents.

Wait….What? You have never heard of FEMA’s CERT program before? Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program educates people about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Using the training learned in the classroom and during exercises, CERT members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help. CERT members also are encouraged to support emergency response agencies by taking a more active role in emergency preparedness projects in their community.

More info can be found on FEMA’s website here.

Want to volunteer within your own community? Want to make a difference in your community? Click here to locate the closest CERT Team to you!

As always, I believe I can make a difference in my community. Fun fact: I’ve been volunteering with my CERT since 2007.

I hope you will do the same.

@rusnivek

Test em if you got em! #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

It’s Friday in the fourth week of 2014 National Preparedness Month.

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

Ahhh, Aloha Fridays!

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Practice for an emergency

#26: Are ALL your emergency flashlights working? Test em if you got em! #Prepared2014 #NatlPrep

Since it’s a beautiful day, I would be a great day to test all your flashlights.

A few weeks ago, I talked about having flashlights in case of an emergency. Now would be the time to test and make sure each flashlight is in working condition.

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Don’t forget about your helmet lights too!

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And for my friends in the law enforcement world, don’t forget to check all your weapon lights too.

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*I also had to change the batteries in my EOTech too.

Your preparedness actions now will definitely save you time during an emergency.

Reminder again, throw away all candles. Candles are dangerous and can start fires. Flashlights are WAY better for lighting.

Happy Aloha Friday everyone!

@rusnivek

Flashlights keeps your family together after a disaster #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

Rainy/gloomy Saturday, and I’m closing out the first week of 2014 National Preparedness Month!

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

Saturday Stuff right?

This week’s theme is consistent with FEMA’s National Preparedness Campaign: Reconnect with Family After a Disaster.

#6: Have at least two (2) flashlights w/ batteries to help navigate in the dark & keep your family together #NatlPrep #Prepared2014

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Pictured above is just one of the three flashlights that I keep in my everyday bag.

Reconnecting with my family after a disaster means that I have preparedness items for them too. It would be worth noting that each flashlight uses the same type of batteries and all operate/function the same (rear push button and twist-on action). This brand and similar power source compatibility allows everyone to have the same gear.

2 is 1 and one is none right? Well, I guess in this case, it’s 3 is 1 and one is none.

For those inquiring on my equipment specifics, I have a Surefire M2 Centurion, a Surefire A2 Aviator, and a Surefire G2 Nitrolon.

Also, a simple red tape marking allows us to easily identify what equipment is ours.

At night, a great flashlight allow you to quickly identify your family members amongst the sea of cheap weaker flashlights in the neighborhood. Trust me, at night, you want the best most powerful flashlights around.

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So have flashlights and batteries ready for all members of your family.

Keeping tools ready for your family is another important parts of keeping your family together during and after a disaster.

@rusnivek