Winter Weather Hazards class at DuPage OHSEM in December!

A fine start to this crisp morning as the DuPage County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management starting the FEMA NDPTC Winter Weather Hazards course!

Welcome intros by Director Murray Snow to our participants from across the state!

Glad to see so many of our most trusted partners here today with almost all Emergency Support Functions represented.

Great to have NDPTC Instructor Rob Dale here again from Michigan where we know the weather there is more worserer than here.

His insight from a small EM agency and weather perspective allows us to see how to increase our ability to address and target specific audiences.

Outstanding to have John Scala. I love his teaching style and ability to share critical points in class is critical because science is…well…hard.

John’s ability to answer questions and explain complex weather issues is so important esp to those of us who are not trained as a MET. Additionally, several of our participants recognize him from his time as a broadcast meteorologist days.

With this class stacked w/ legit meteorologists, I am proud that these classes are a big hit with our peeps!

Just in time because the weather outside is frightful…

Stay warm peeps!

@rusnivek

Everyone’s doing it! #Winter #Weather #Preparedness

Initiate #Disaster #preparedness!!!!

Yep, that’s the ever popular and infamous #bread #milk #eggs 🤣

Now what the heck am I supposed to make with this stuff?!?!?

❄️

@rusnivek

Instructing FEMA NDPTC Winter Weather Hazards at Effingham County EOC #Illinois

Starting out the morning in Illinois at the Effingham County Emergency Operations Center!

Glad to see sooooo many smiling faces here to learn about preparedness and science with our efforts to better prepare our public safety partners on winter weather hazards.

And sharing how critical the National Weather Service is to our daily response and every single Emergency Operations Center is essential for all professionals in any emergency. No matter where you are in the US, there is a NWS office to support your daily operations.

Sharing important information on the science of weather including how to discern these crazy charts, graphs, and data make it easier to understand how tough meteorologists have it when trying to forecast the weather.

And sharing real case studies and discussion the evolution of how response officials work together is critical for any community across this great nation.

Teaching at Effingham County helped me realize they got some really cool stuff here (aka Emergency Management toys resources!)

Special shout out to Pam and the entire crew at Effingham County EMA as well as everyone in Illinois Region-9.

Looking forward to seeing all of you at the next big one!

@rusnivek

Blizzard of 2015 meme – Hoard water, spam and bacon

Since we are talking about winter preparedness today, I am reminded about this meme created in 2015.

b8p8d6dimaagt9o

Yes, I said meme. It looks like a screen grab from a national news station, but it has been doctored up a bit. Obviously.

While I cannot support all the bullet points, I can tell you that first bullet point definitely on my list.

BTW-it’s Hoard water, SPAM, and bacon.

Long live the Oxford comma!

@rusnivek

 

Presenting today at the 2016 CEAO Annual Conference #PIO

Presenting today at the 2016 County Engineers Association of Ohio Annual Conference!

logo_ceao_tagline

Public Information stuff as well as some Communications Strategies for government officials.


I’ll try not to dance on stage today.  


Maybe.

Looks like it’s going to be a fun class!

@rusnivek

Mittens? I don’t need no stinkin’ mittens! #Winter #Weather #Preparedness #OHWx

Mittens? I don’t need no stinkin’ mittens!

mittens

Wrong. You do. Go back inside and put them on.

Dress for the Weather

  • If you must go outside, wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer of heavy clothing. The outer garments should be tightly woven and water repellent.
  • Wear mittens, which are warmer than gloves.
  • Wear a hat. A hat will prevent loss of body heat.
  • Cover your mouth with a scarf to protect your lungs.

Stay warm this winter season!

@rusnivek

 

Walk slowly #Winter #Weather #Preparedness #OHWx

Walk slower in the Winter? What?

walk1

Seriously!

walk2

Freezing rain is rain that freezes when it hits the ground, creating a coating of ice on roads, walkways, trees and power lines…so SLOW DOWN!

So remember to walk carefully on snowy, icy, walkways.

walk3

OK, that’s better.

@rusnivek

 

Do you have Frostbite? Hypothermia? #OHWx #Winter #Weather #Preparedness

Do you have Frostbite? Hypothermia? Is there a difference?

frostbite

Frostbite:

You have frostbite when your body tissue freezes. The most susceptible parts of the body are fingers, toes, ear lobes, or the tip of the nose. Symptoms include a loss of feeling in the extremity and a white or pale appearance. Get medical attention immediately for frostbite. The area should be SLOWLY rewarmed using warm, not hot water.

Hypothermia:

  • Hypothermia occurs when body temperature falls below 95°F. Determine your temperature with a thermometer.
  • Warning signs include uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness and exhaustion.
  • Get medical attention immediately. If you can’t get help quickly, begin warming the body SLOWLY. Warm the body core first, NOT the extremities. Warming extremities first drives the cold blood to the heart and can cause the body temperature to drop further–which may lead to heart failure.
  • If you are helping someone else with hypothermia, get the person into dry clothing and wrap in a warm blanket. Be sure to cover the head and neck.
  • Do not give the person alcohol, drugs, coffee, or any HOT beverage or food. WARM broth and food is better.
  • About 20% of cold related deaths occur in the home. Young children under the age of two and the elderly (those more than 65 years old), are most susceptible to hypothermia.
  • Hypothermia can set in over a period of time. Keep the thermostat above 69°F, wear warm clothing, eat food for warmth, and drink plenty of water or fluids other than alcohol and caffeine to keep hydrated.
  • Avoid alcohol because it will LOWER your body temperature.

Information provided by NOAA/NWS:

@rusnivek