Coming in on @GCRTA for the #RNC2016 ? Here’s the #RNCINFO

Like me, are you using the Greater Cleveland Rapid Transit Authority (GCRTA) to get to downtown Cleveland?

Here’s their map and information on their downtown stops.

rta-rnc-service-map-page-001

Also, you can subscribe FOR FREE to their Commuter Alerts program here.

I have found their social media team is very responsive to inquiries. Follow them on Twitter:  @GCRTA

BTW-If you happen to see me, say hi and let’s take a #selfie!

@rusnivek

 

Immediate evac? Command decision? or Additional companies?

To my Firefighter peeps – Watch this video below. Few questions for you to ponder:

1. Just by observation, did the conditions necessitate the immediate evacuation from large residential structure?

2. Should Command have known of conditions in the 360/scene size-up to pull crews out?

3. Do Truck companies with tools and ladders or even a Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) exist in other municipalities?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=128&v=NrUFYseJwBE

Share with your duty crews.

And more importantly, to all the Dads out there, Happy Father’s Day!

@rusnivek

Cleared for departure from RAP with special clearance

Really enjoying the All-American themes lately. And this week has been no exception.


It was suggested that I get an aerial perspective when I depart. So clearing it with Ellsworth Approach, our pilots planned a quick figure 8 pass on our departure out of RAP.


I only wish I had my DSLR. Don’t worry Maverick, the pattern wasn’t full. Chillax!

Special thanks to the All-American flight crew today #Merica !

Now on to Florida!

@rusnivek

You should know about the Worcester-6 Cold Storage Warehouse Fire #W6

Take a few moments to learn about the now infamous Cold Storage Warehouse Fire in Worcester, Massachusetts.

fire1

Honor your fallen Firefighters who gave their life on December 3, 1999.

  • Worcester Fire Rescue-1 Firefighter Paul Brotherton
  • Worcester Fire Rescue-1 Firefighter Jeremiah Lucey
  • Worcester Fire Rescue-1 Lieutenant Thomas Spencer
  • Worcester Fire Ladder-2 Firefighter Timothy Jackson
  • Worcester Fire Engine-3 Firefighter James Lyons
  • Worcester Fire Engine-3 Firefighter Joseph McGuirk

***In my opinion, this fire is a defining moment in fire service history***

All Firefighters should know about this fire by heart.

Well, even if you don’t read the entire NIOSH report, at LEAST read the summary below.

SUMMARY

On December 3, 1999, six career fire fighters died after they became lost in a six-floor, maze-like, cold-storage and warehouse building while searching for two homeless people and fire extension. It is presumed that the homeless people had accidentally started the fire on the second floor sometime between 1630 and 1745 hours and then left the building. An off-duty police officer who was driving by called Central Dispatch and reported that smoke was coming from the top of the building. When the first alarm was struck at 1815 hours, the fire had been in progress for about 30 to 90 minutes. Beginning with the first alarm, a total of five alarms were struck over a span of 1 hour and 13 minutes, with the fifth called in at 1928 hours. Responding were 16 apparatus, including 11 engines, 3 ladders, 1 rescue, and 1 aerial scope, and a total of 73 fire fighters. Two incident commanders (IC#1 and IC#2) in two separate cars also responded.

Fire fighters from the apparatus responding on the first alarm were ordered to search the building for homeless people and fire extension. During the search efforts, two fire fighters (Victims 1 and 2) became lost, and at 1847 hours, one of them sounded an emergency message. A head count ordered by Interior Command confirmed which fire fighters were missing.

Fire fighters who had responded on the first and third alarms were then ordered to conduct search-and-rescue operations for Victims 1 and 2 and the homeless people. During these efforts, four more fire fighters became lost. Two fire fighters (Victims 3 and 4) became disoriented and could not locate their way out of the building. At 1910 hours, one of the fire fighters radioed Command that they needed help finding their way out and that they were running out of air. Four minutes later he radioed again for help. Two other fire fighters (victims 5 and 6) did not make initial contact with command nor anyone at the scene, and were not seen entering the building. However, according to the Central Dispatch transcripts, they may have joined Victims 3 and 4 on the fifth floor. At 1924 hours, IC#2 called for a head count and determined that six fire fighters were now missing. At 1949 hours, the crew from Engine 8 radioed that they were on the fourth floor and that the structural integrity of the building had been compromised. At 1952 hours, a member from the Fire Investigations Unit reported to the Chief that heavy fire had just vented through the roof on the C side. At 2000 hours, Interior Command ordered all companies out of the building, and a series of short horn blasts were sounded to signal the evacuation. Fire fighting operations changed from an offensive attack, including search and rescue, to a defensive attack with the use of heavy-stream appliances. After the fire had been knocked down, search-and-recovery operations commenced until recall of the box alarm 8 days later on December 11, 1999, at 2227 hours, when all six fire fighters’ bodies had been recovered. NIOSH investigators concluded that, to minimize the risk of similar occurrences, fire departments should

    • ensure that inspections of vacant buildings and pre-fire planning are conducted which cover all potential hazards, structural building materials (type and age), and renovations that may be encountered during a fire, so that the Incident Commander will have the necessary structural information to make informed decisions and implement an appropriate plan of attack

  • ensure that the incident command system is fully implemented at the fire scene

  • ensure that a separate Incident Safety Officer, independent from the Incident Commander, is appointed when activities, size of fire, or need occurs, such as during multiple alarm fires, or responds automatically to pre-designated fires

  • ensure that standard operating procedures (SOPs) and equipment are adequate and sufficient to support the volume of radio traffic at multiple-alarm fires

  • ensure that Incident Command always maintains close accountability for all personnel at the fire scene

  •  use guide ropes/tag lines securely attached to permanent objects at entry portals and place high-intensity floodlights at entry portals to assist lost or disoriented fire fighters in emergency escape

  • ensure that a Rapid Intervention Team is established and in position upon their arrival at the fire scene

  • implement an overall health and safety program such as the one recommended in NFPA 1500, Standard on Fire Department Occupational Safety and Health Program

  • consider using a marking system when conducting searches

  • identify dangerous vacant buildings by affixing warning placards to entrance doorways or other openings where fire fighters may enter

  • ensure that officers enforce and fire fighters follow the mandatory mask rule per administrative guidelines established by the department

  • explore the use of thermal imaging cameras to locate lost or downed fire fighters and civilians in fire environments

 

 

worc six

 

@rusnivek

Thank goodness, I did NOT burn my house down… #DFT2013

Say hello to my little friend…

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…his name is Deep Fried Turkey #DFT2013

Boom – SUCCESS!

Much to the dismay of my fellow Firefighters, Emergency Management Professionals, Paramedics, EMTs, and Police Officers – I didn’t burn my house down.

But it IS time to chow down with the family.

Hope these tweets and posts have helped you out in your turkey adventures today.

Remember:

  • Be safe and do NOT compromise for your safety.
  • Deep frying turkey is NO joke. This is serious business.
  • Make sure your fryer is at least 30 ft away from any house or structure.
  • Do NOT deep fry your turkey on your deck.
  • No kids outside.
  • Stay with your turkey fryer all the time. Do NOT go inside to warm up.
  • Have your cell phone ready and know how to call 9-1-1.
  • Have a fire extinguisher ready to go close by.
  • And of course, no adult beverages while cooking.

Note: For cleanup? I’m going to let the oil cool down for about 6 hours. And regardless if there is no fire, I’m still keeping my extinguisher on the ready.

Keep all of these safety tips handy as you finish your bird this joyous holiday season.

I have much to be thankful for…like you folks as well as my solid family and friends.

Enjoy your evening everyone!

@rusnivek

 

 

Deep Fried Rapid turkey Extraction – starting now! #DFT2013

Ready for rapid turkey extraction #DFT2013

Boots, pants, coat, helmet, gloves on.

Slowly pull out…..SLOWLY!

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OMFG, either this is going to go well, or really bad.

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Wish me luck.

@rusnivek