Detailed warning information on upcoming weather threats and other hazards

Welcome to the third week of 2020 National Preparedness Month! This week, we will be addressing how to prepare for specific disasters.

Compared to other weeks where we talk about general topics, plans, and maybe some things in your kit, we will be talking about how you can get stuff ready for each type of emergency or disaster.

So to start out, let’s talk about information about upcoming disasters.

A solid tool that is almost indispensable is…..your cell phone!

That’s right, that little computer/smart phone in your pocket is a GREAT way that you can discern information and better respond to the emergency.

One easy way is to download the FEMA app.

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https://www.fema.gov/about/news-multimedia/app

The FEMA app has a ton of features that could be beneficial to your specific area. Specifically in the notification for five of your identified cities/county.

This feature provides the ability to see what’s going on in a certain area of the country. And since I travel, I always have the first slot in my list for home. This allows me to get any notification on stuff that could be happening at home.

The second, third, and fourth slot are for my family in Los Angles, Honolulu, and San Francisco. Gotta keep an eye on the family no matter where they are. Plus an extra set of eyes from another part of the country is beneficial esp if they are sleeping at 0300 and it’s 0800 here.

Since I travel a fair amount, I usually reserve slot #5 (the last slot) for my work travel. Even though I may not be from Central City, I will always know the latest in dangers in my travel city.

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From critical tornado warnings or immediate evacuation tsunami warnings – I know I’ll be prepared for my location(s) specific disaster or emergency.

All of the information provided to you….FREE. That’s right-all the details are available to you for free. App is free. No charge from FEMA to download the app. No monthly fee. No recurring administrative charges.

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Ahhhh, safety for free.

I got your back.

More free tips tomorrow addressing specific hazards.

Reporting live from the third week!

@rusnivek

Starting out – NIMS and ICS online classes

If you are getting started in taking a few National Incident Management System (NIMS) / Incident Command System (ICS) classes, you’ve come to the right place! Best part about the classes below? They are all online, available 24/7/365, and can be done for free.

Here’s a list of recommended Incident Command System (ICS) classes according to the 2008 requirements.

1. ICS-100.b: Introduction to the Incident Command System (ICS)

2. ICS-700.a: National Incident Management System (NIMS) An Introduction

3. ICS-200.b: ICS for Single Resource and Initial Action Incidents

4. ICS-800.b: National Response Framework, An Introduction

After you complete the courses above, let me know so I can recommend the next steps in training.

BTW-You even get a certificate when you successfully complete the above class and post tests.

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@rusnivek

 

Toledo LifeFlight under the microscope for non-life threatening aeromedical transport #EMS

So it seems like Toledo LifeFlight and Put-In-Bay EMS just made WKYC’s news last night. I’m not quite sure who this investigative report is intended to pin the blame, but to me it sounds like Toledo LifeFlight is under the microscope because of non-life threatening aeromedical transport.

(Pertaining to EMS calls) “We don’t want to go short on the staff here.” – Keith Kahler, PiB EMS.

“…anxiety attack that looks very similar to a chest pain” – Dr. Daniel Schwerin, Toledo LifeFlight Medical Director.

Watch WKYC’s investigative story here

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Did WKYC cut Dr. Schwerin clip a bit short? Did the spokesperson from PiB EMS give contradictory statements? Or did Tom Meyer get too excited just by reading police reports?

Let me know what you think.

@rusnivek