Detailed warning information on upcoming weather threats and other hazards

Welcome to the third week of 2020 National Preparedness Month! This week, we will be addressing how to prepare for specific disasters.

Compared to other weeks where we talk about general topics, plans, and maybe some things in your kit, we will be talking about how you can get stuff ready for each type of emergency or disaster.

So to start out, let’s talk about information about upcoming disasters.

A solid tool that is almost indispensable is…..your cell phone!

That’s right, that little computer/smart phone in your pocket is a GREAT way that you can discern information and better respond to the emergency.

One easy way is to download the FEMA app.

See the source image

https://www.fema.gov/about/news-multimedia/app

The FEMA app has a ton of features that could be beneficial to your specific area. Specifically in the notification for five of your identified cities/county.

This feature provides the ability to see what’s going on in a certain area of the country. And since I travel, I always have the first slot in my list for home. This allows me to get any notification on stuff that could be happening at home.

The second, third, and fourth slot are for my family in Los Angles, Honolulu, and San Francisco. Gotta keep an eye on the family no matter where they are. Plus an extra set of eyes from another part of the country is beneficial esp if they are sleeping at 0300 and it’s 0800 here.

Since I travel a fair amount, I usually reserve slot #5 (the last slot) for my work travel. Even though I may not be from Central City, I will always know the latest in dangers in my travel city.

See the source image

From critical tornado warnings or immediate evacuation tsunami warnings – I know I’ll be prepared for my location(s) specific disaster or emergency.

All of the information provided to you….FREE. That’s right-all the details are available to you for free. App is free. No charge from FEMA to download the app. No monthly fee. No recurring administrative charges.

See the source image

Ahhhh, safety for free.

I got your back.

More free tips tomorrow addressing specific hazards.

Reporting live from the third week!

@rusnivek

FREE Emergency Response Guidebook 2016 #HAZMAT #ERG

Morning peeps –

Here’s the new 2016 Emergency Response Guidebook 2016 for FREE

***CLICK HERE***

Consider downloading on all your computers, laptops, mobile data terminals (MDTs), tablets, and mobile devices.

IMG_8830

#HAZMAT #ERG

@rusnivek

 

IMG_0061

 

National Call to Action Day! Thanks to @PrepareAthon @ReadyGov 

Take a few minutes to commit to being ready for disasters that may threaten your community. The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Region V office in Chicago, Ill., is encouraging everyone to take part in America’s PrepareAthon! National Day of Action on April 30 and consider doing at least one activity to improve your resilience to potential disasters.

“Spring in the Midwest can bring a heightened risk for severe weather, so it’s even more critical for people to get ready now,” said FEMA Region V Administrator Andrew Velasquez III. “Be proactive, and engage your family, friends and neighbors in one of the many simple ways to prepare for emergencies.”

Sign up for local alerts and warnings and check for access to wireless emergency alerts. Visit your city and/or county website to find out if they offer emergency alert notifications through their own systems. You should also ensure your cell phone is enabled to receive Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) to warn you of extreme weather and other emergencies in your area. And always heed the weather warnings from your local National Weather Service Office (NWS).

Download the free FEMA app to get and stay prepared: Access disaster safety tips, an emergency kit list, emergency meeting location information, and a map with open shelters. Text ANDROID or APPLE to 43362 (4FEMA) and receive a link for download.

Follow preparedness agencies on Twitter like @FEMA  @FEMARegion5 @Ohio_EMA @rusnivek @ReadyGov @PrepareAthon @CraigatFEMA for quick information and regularly posted preparedness tips.

Develop and test emergency communications plans. Visit www.Ready.gov/plan-for-your-risks for tips on how to ensure your plan is as comprehensive as possible.

Assemble or update emergency supplies. Include drinking water, a first-aid kit, canned food, a radio, flashlight and blankets. Visit www.Ready.gov/build-a-kit for a disaster supply checklist. Don’t forget to store additional supply kits in your car and at the office too.

Collect and safeguard critical documents. Keep copies in your home and store originals in a secure place outside the home, such as a bank safe deposit box.

These easy preparedness steps takes seconds to complete. 

  

Be a part of the 2015 National Call to Action and be prepared for any disaster or emergency.

@rusnivek


Precise Emergency Messaging Safety-PIO-SM-14-002

14-002: Precise Emergency Messaging
Agency: Indianapolis Motor Speedway Topic(s):         Emergency Messaging
Date: Summer 2014 Platform:        General

Mass notification and public messaging about dangerous inbound weather is the latest hot button topic in emergency management because no matter the location, everyone is susceptible. This year has been especially deadly with numerous tornadoes.

You can argue the use of automatic Emergency Alert System (EAS), Integrated Public Alert & Warning System’s (iPAWS) messages, and public address systems are good enough, but successful delivery still comes down to basic messaging.

On May 25, 2014, this message was put up on the main billboard on the field during the Indianapolis 500, which had 300,000+ fans during race time. The National Weather Service (NWS) declared a Tornado Warning before the start of the race.

5

Race Fans? C’mon, you have a captive audience at the motor speedway. And you are addressing everyone there, not just race fans. Most likely, your audience is saying “Great, now what is a Tornado Warning?

Clear and concise messaging is incredibly important because seconds will matter in an immediate evacuation or leading others to shelter…especially with large, open, and unprotected public venues. This particular message was unclear, poorly worded, and definitely not concise.

A more effective messaging and follow-up post should have read:

DANGER! TORNADO WARNING NOW – SEEK SHELTER IMMEDIATELY!

Safe SHELTERS are located at AREA X and GATE X

By phrasing it this way:

1. Your message is short, sweet, and to the point.

2. Capital letters will grab the attention of your audience and convey urgency.

3. Have clearly identified safe locations IN CAPITAL LETTERS will assist those reading your message.

4. Shorter messaging could allow your followers to retweet/repost and amplify your emergency messaging.

5. It is still tornado season so make sure you are prepared by having pre-scripted messages on “what is a tornado warning” and messaging on how to “shelter-in-place”.

 

All concurrent Tweets, Facebook posts, Instagram posts, etc. should reflect this messaging. If a Tornado warning is issued, timing is of the essence. Do not be lax when it comes to emergency messaging because you don’t want to ruin the fun. For the sake of your constituents, it is better to error on the side of safety.

Time is valuable, so post good stuff.

@rusnivek

 

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this: Safety-PIO-SM-14-001

The made up #hashtag Safety-PIO-SM-14-001

 

14-001: The made up #hashtag
Agency: Bath Township Fire Topic(s):         Prevention and engagement
Date: Spring 2014 Platform:        Twitter

Twice a year, moving our clocks ahead/behind one hour for daylight savings time provides all of us public safety the opportunity to push an easy fire safety tip to our constituents. It’s a good time to remind folks to test their smoke alarms. That’s what BTFD FC did when they posted this message on twitter, which included the #gopushthebuttton hashtag.

photo 1

Keep in mind that Twitter’s mantra is short concise messaging limited to 140 characters. The idea behind a hashtag is to pair your tweet with other tweets out in the twittersverse. So I did a quick search for #gopushthebutton and found only one tweet from BTFD FC. With no other tweets using that hashtags, using #gopushthebutton was just wasted characters.

photo 2

If you use irrelevant or made up hashtags, all you end up doing is wasting valuable space. Long tweets do not allow your followers the room to retweet your valuable content to their followers because of 140 maximum character counts.

A more effective tweet could have read:

Test every smoke alarm & CO detector in your home today. An easy safety reminder from XXFD. More info? www.XXFD.org

 

By phrasing it this way:

1. You have more visibility by reminding your followers test both smoke and CO detectors.

2. Twitter shows your twitter handle and name with the tweet, so don’t waste space by repeating information already in plain sight.

3. Do not use a made up hashtag as it will confuse your followers. In a serious tweet, use a serious hashtag.

4. Using the word “easy” will likely get your followers to complete a task because it’s easy.

5. Or consider using a more popular hashtag. In this case, #daylightsavings or #springforward

6. Reference your website for more information on detectors. Also you are establishing your agency as a trusted source with good information. And through analytics, you can also track how many people visited your tweeted website which could assist in quantifying your social media efforts.

 

Time is valuable, so tweet good stuff.

@rusnivek

 

***To download this as a single-page printable format, click this: Safety-PIO-SM-14-001

cropped-1235 - Copy