Happy 2016 #NationalWeatherPersonsDay

Happy 2016 National Weather Persons Day!

This year, my favorite Meteorologist is Brooke Bingaman from the NWS-Sacramento Office in California.

NationalWeatherPersonsDay

@brookeBingaman and @rusnivek

She is an outstanding Meteorologist, rock solid social media peep, amazing presenter, and an extraordinary preparedness expert. Trust me peeps: Brooke. Is. Legit.

Follow her adventures as she’s doing some special event things for a big event this weekend.

1642_img7

NWS in action!

BTW-My 2015 favorite Meteorologist Gary Garnet was just promoted as the Meteorologist in Charge at the National Weather Service Cleveland Office in Ohio. Well done Gary!

NationalWeatherPersonsDay

Gary Garnet, NWS-Cleveland (Ohio)

Who is your favorite meteorologist?

Share your favorite Meteorologist on social media and celebrate National Weather Persons Day by using the #NationalWeatherPersonsDay !

@rusnivek

Retrofitted military aircraft to support wildfire operations

One of my friends in California just emailed me this picture.

CQSHTigWgAAmtjn

National Guard members have retrofitted various aircraft including this C-130 with alternate equipment for wildfire operations.

IMG_7362

I am really impressed with how local, state, Federal, and military assets are working together to control the wildfires. All-Hazards indeed!

IMG_7363

Nice work everyone!

@rusnivek

Its dangerous working with prop aircraft use #NatlPrep

It’s dangerous working with propeller aircraft use #NatlPrep

IMG_7269

No joke-do not walk into the props!

Safety is always the first priority when doing air operations of any kind.

The general public should take the time to watch the news and find out the areas that have active air operations. Stay clear of those areas.

Also probably a good time to remind you about these things.

stelprd3837335

Don’t wait. Communicate. Make your emergency plan today.

CKYhdyqUMAQdNj1

@rusnivek

This DC-10 (aka 10 Tanker Air Carrier) makes large drops possible #NatlPrep #VLAT

Specialty aircraft like this DC-10 (aka 10 Tanker Air Carrier) make large drops possible #NatlPrep #VLAT

IMG_7374

I got a chance to see this aircraft up close when I was at McClellan airport.

It’s amazing how air professionals can take older resources and make them into something that can help so many.

Making sure we expend all resources and their effectiveness is key for any emergency or disaster response.

Don’t wait. Communicate. Make your emergency plan today.

CKYhdyqUMAQdNj1

@rusnivek

California has an all-hazards response to wildfires #NatlPrep

California has working closely w/ the National Guard to provide support to wildland firefighters.

IMG_7363

Here’s a C-130 retrofitted slightly differently to carry different payloads to support operations. This year’s wildfires are bad. Glad that many partners in public safety have trained and exercised closely together to prepare for such an occasion.

Working in consort, this all-hazards response is making a difference every day.

So support or join your local National Guard. You could be on the front lines!

Don’t wait. Communicate. Make your emergency plan today.

CKYhdyqUMAQdNj1

@rusnivek

Final FEMA review of the new social media courses #NDPTC

I popped back-to-back-to-back social media classes last week in Sacramento, California.

IMG_7410

Participants from all over the west coast attended. Specifically for Thursday and Friday, FEMA reviewed our new curriculum courses. Yep, straight up evaluation. Not going to lie, I was pretty nervous.

IMG_1960

Ongoing for course design, I will make a few more additions/changes before courses are sent to the National Training and Exercise Division (NTED) for certification. Hoping for final approval in November 2015. Hope to hear the magical words “Federally published” as my course is listed in the DHS / FEMA Training catalog. Whoa Nellie!

IMG_7508

 For the classes? We had great interaction from all participants.

IMG_7457

Solid discussions during the breakout sessions included professionals from all Emergency Support Functions (ESFs) as well as experts from the National Weather Service (NWS), Critical Infrastructure, and Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters (VOADs), etc… Diverse groups make for the best discussions for sure!

IMG_7412

As part of our continued efforts in Emergency Management, it is imperative that we address issues from the All-Hazards approach and incorporate the support of our stakeholders in solutions.

IMG_7393

With heavy discussion, class participants had a great time engaging with others and using tools/techniques that are specific to the Preparedness, Response, Recovery, and Mitigation Directorates. Obviously, I showcased the importance of a good Public Information Officer (PIO) / Public Affairs Officer (PAO) and how their interaction in the Emergency Operation Center (EOC) or the Joint Information Center/System (JIC/JIS) is imperative to a successful emergency or disaster.

Also, starting to build an online learning library that can be easily accessed from anywhere using the #NDPTC is always good reference. Free. My favorite F-word.

IMG_7470

Special mahalos to fellow Instructors Cheryl and MaryJo in the delivery of these courses.

IMG_7422

Also the solid smiles from fellow #SMEM Jennifer and Scott was crucial support on this delivery.

Glad to be working with partners like the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), National Domestic Preparedness Consortium (NDPC), and the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center (NDPTC). Truly great to see everyone working collaboratively. Thanks to the Sacramento County Emergency Management for hosting these courses.

Looking forward to the next class at the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM) conference in Clark County, Nevada. See you there!

@rusnivek

Created and designed and now piloting the new SM

I rolled out my new FEMA presentation for FEMA Region-4 peeps at Florida State University in Tallahassee, FL.


At this time, this course is the semi-final pilot so I’m almost there!

Obvs, I had to incorporate a great preparedness campaign from my friends at the CDC.  Have you heard of their preparedness campaign before? It costed the CDC a killer $87 (Get it? I’m so punny).


How about them Zombies?


Classroom activities make it easier for our all-hazards partners to come up with good messaging during preparedness, response, and recovery.


Shared experiences and open discussion amongst public safety providers allows for solid social media solutions to be developed for many common issues.


Participants use various hardware and software platforms to complete each assigned performance-based task. This showcases the spectrum of social media that spans hardware and software differences.


Final will be presented for certification in August in FEMA Region-9 at the State of California Emergency Operations Center located in Sacramento.


So nervous! But seriously, I’m so excited for this project, I can’t even…

@rusnivek

6.0 Earthquake in California – here’s some free tips to stay safe after an earthquake #Napa #Sonoma #CAEQ #CAEarthquake

For those in and around Napa/Sonoma area in California – take caution in all activities.

imagesssssssssssssss

Here are some tips that you can use as you recover from your large earthquake.

  • When the shaking stops, look around to make sure it is safe to move. Then exit the building.
  • Expect aftershocks. These secondary shockwaves are usually less violent than the main quake but can be strong enough to do additional damage to weakened structures and can occur in the first hours, days, weeks, or even months after the quake.
  • Help injured or trapped persons. Remember to help your neighbors who may require special assistance such as infants, the elderly and people with access and functional needs. Give first aid where appropriate. Do not move seriously injured persons unless they are in immediate danger of further injury. Call for help.
  • Look for and extinguish small fires. Fire is the most common hazard after an earthquake.
  • Listen to a battery-operated radio or television for the latest emergency information.
  • Be aware of possible tsunamis if you live in coastal areas. These are also known as seismic sea waves (mistakenly called “tidal waves”). When local authorities issue a tsunami warning, assume that a series of dangerous waves is on the way. Stay away from the beach.
  • Use the telephone only for emergency calls.
  • Go to a designated public shelter if your home had been damaged and is no longer safe.
  • Stay away from damaged areas. Stay away unless your assistance has been specifically requested by police, fire, or relief organizations. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.
  • Be careful when driving after an earthquake and anticipate traffic light outages.
  • After it is determined that its’ safe to return, your safety should be your primary priority as you begin clean up and recovery.
  • Open cabinets cautiously. Beware of objects that can fall off shelves.
  • Put on long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, sturdy shoes and work gloves to protect against injury from broken objects.
  • Clean up spilled medicines, bleaches, gasoline or other flammable liquids immediately. Leave the area if you smell gas or fumes from other chemicals.
  • Inspect the entire length of chimneys for damage. Unnoticed damage could lead to a fire.
  • Check for gas leaks. If you smell gas or hear blowing or hissing noise, open a window and quickly leave the building. Turn off the gas at the outside main valve if you can and call the gas company from a neighbor’s home. If you turn off the gas for any reason, it must be turned back on by a professional.
  • Look for electrical system damage. If you see sparks or broken or frayed wires, or if you smell hot insulation, turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker. If you have to step in water to get to the fuse box or circuit breaker, call an electrician first for advice.
  • Check for sewage and water lines damage. If you suspect sewage lines are damaged, avoid using the toilets and call a plumber. If water pipes are damaged, contact the water company and avoid using water from the tap. You can obtain safe water by melting ice cubes.

For more up to the minute information, consider following @femaregion9 for more details.

Drop-Cover-and-Hold-On

Stay safe everyone.

@rusnivek

Cold water challenge in a restricted area? No joy!

Since this is a restricted area, I just asked the commanding officer of the USCG station if I could do the Firefighter cold water challenge here under the Golden Gate Bridge…they said no.

IMG_1135

Don’t worry, I’ll keep trying.

Standby-1

@rusnivek

 

Today at 10:17am, you should practice these 3 easy steps… #ShakeOut

After the most recent events that just occurred in the Philippines on Tuesday, I highly recommend that you participate in today’s Earthquake ShakeOut exercise.

“This isn’t California…Ohio doesn’t have earthquakes…”

WRONG McFly! The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) have recorded six earthquakes so far this year: three earthquakes in March and three earthquakes in July. Ohio had a total of four earthquakes in 2012.

Surprised? I know you are.

So on Thursday October 17, 2013 at 10:17am – practice your earthquake safety procedures with 9 other states in our region using these three easy steps:

Drop-Cover-and-Hold-On

1. DROPto the ground 

2. Take COVERunder a sturdy table or desk, if possible, and protect your head and neck

3. HOLD ONuntil the shaking stops

Following these 3 easy steps will help protect and you during an earthquake.

ShakeOut is coordinated by the Central U.S. Earthquake Consortium and the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma and Tennessee.

See, even the cool kids are doing it.

image_173314_4

Stay safe!

@rusnivek